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Outsider65
Sat, Apr 22, 2017, 5:06am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek Into Darkness

I laugh every time nuSpock screams "KHAAAAAAAN". The guy hasn't even known Kirk long enough to get upset about his death, let alone been friends with him long enough to form that kind of bond. It's just his anger issues coming out as always. Why is nuSpock so prone to fits of rage? Watching this short, borderline-chubby guy chase after lithe, lanky (yes, I know those are opposites) Khan was laughable. Even if he had caught up with his short legs, he'd never win. Where are the buckets of green blood? If I remember correctly nuSpock even gets impaled in the next movie and they still don't show hardly any blood. We're the filmmakers embarrassed to show green blood for some reason?

Cumberbatch should have been a Gorn or other alien race. He'd have made a really great Gorn. The man already looks reptilian. He'd have also made a good Vulcan. But he wasn't a great Khan, mostly because the character he was given to play was nothing like the real Khan. It was a really strange casting choice IMO, probably based off of Cumberbatch's popularity rather than suitability for the character.

I hate to be that person, but... Would it kill them to have casted a guy who at least resembled the guy who played the original Khan?

Actually, I wish they hadn't ripped off Wrath of Khan but instead had made their own movie. It just invites comparisons between the two and theirs is so vastly inferior.
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Outsider65
Sat, Apr 22, 2017, 3:59am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country

**Valeris, not Saavik
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Outsider65
Sat, Apr 22, 2017, 3:47am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country

@JohnC

I don't speak for everyone, but if you're referring to my comment, I call all "forced psychic entry into someone's mind" scenes that come up in Trek mindrape, because that's what it's called. It's portrayed as a deep violation of a person to do that to them without consent, force your way into their mind, and in the common vernacular it is referred to as "mindrape".

It has nothing to do with Saavik being female. There's a TNG episode where a guy mindrapes two female characters and one male character and it is explicitly called rape by the characters in that episode. A scene from the original series where Spock mindmelds with an unaware sleeping Kirk is often referred to as mindrape as well.

It's called mindrape because it's considered a horrible violation of a person, not because it's implied that it's saying something bad about Spock. The term is meant to make you uncomfortable, to emphasis what the writers are trying to get across: that it's a horrible violation and thus a truly last-resort when Spock does it. I don't use the term because I am accusing Spock of being a bad person, I use the term because in Sci-fi, that is the term used to describe the event that took place. It's not a 100% accurate term but it's the term used.
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Outsider65
Fri, Apr 21, 2017, 11:26pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Cause and Effect

@RT

Thanks for the info, I never knew it was a command from on high.

Whatever the reasoning, it did make for a hilarious character quirk. He did things like straddling over the back of a chair to sit on it instead of going around to sit on it, there's a post out there somewhere mentioning how it's a good thing Riker never wore the man-skirt background characters wore in the early seasons when he tried that. I've also noticed he really leaned over to the side when in meetings, his hand touching or almost touching the hand of the person beside him, like he wanted to hold their hand (usually Data or Troi). He just moves and positions himself oddly in general, I'm curious as to why they told him to do that. Then again I've noticed that in a lot of scenes characters will be pressed right up against each other even when there's plenty of room for them to spread out, like when there are two people on the lift. Either the concept of personal space has changed radically on the 24th century, or they're all trying to fit into the shot. ;) (My sister jokingly says it's because being in space makes them feel so small and lonely they need the physical contact to feel safe.)

I never noticed the patch, that's an interesting tidbit. Now if we could only get confirmation on Kirk's girdle. :)
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Outsider65
Fri, Apr 21, 2017, 10:14pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: The Chase

Just noticed I spelled my name wrong. Not sure how I managed that but I'm blaming the lack of tactile response on this keyboard.
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Outsider65
Fri, Apr 21, 2017, 9:44pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Lessons

A believable romance for Picard, and while a bit cheesy, especially seeing him being all smitten like a little kid, it was fun seeing them crawling into the Jeffries tubes. Gotta wonder how many shifts Data is working though, he apparently covers the night shift as well as manning the helm during the day and sometimes working down in engineering with Geordi. When does he find the time to feed his cat and pursue his various hobbies?
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Outsider65
Fri, Apr 21, 2017, 9:13pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Frame of Mind

ThiS is like, what, the third or fourth episode where Riker is subject to false reality or torture/kidnapping?? I wish they'd give him more action-y roles like he had in previous seasons, or even any roles at all, he's basically a side character now. I don't find the action roles doled out to Picard in the later seasons believable at all, the guy's just too old for it, wish they had stuck to Picard being control room and Riker being ground support. Stewart's a good actor but I'd rather watch Riker than Picard.

Also wondering, did O'Brien transfer to DS9 back in that one two-parter where Data learns to dream but TNG never mentioned it because they assumed you watched DS9 and having it mentioned twice would be redundant? And is there an explanation for why Guinan is gone or does she just disappear just as suddenly as she appeared?
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Outsider65
Fri, Apr 21, 2017, 8:28pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: The Chase

A lot of buildup and nonsense for a revelation that is not only made obvious throughout the episode but was also already established back in TOS. Don't reintroduce a fact established in the previous series and treat it as though it's some profound secret. Next they'll be "revealing" that Romulans and Vulcans have the same forebears so they should really stop hating each other and get along. Maybe I'm just bitter that the lesson in this one is still so incredibly relevant today, but I really didn't like this one.

0 stars
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Outsider65
Thu, Apr 13, 2017, 10:51am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S2: Peak Performance

I don't see what's implausible about there being a species out there that can beat a supercomputer at a game. I mean we have Q and he's definitely more implausible but I don't see too many complaints about him.

As for Troi beating Data at space chess in a later episode, he probably has an "easy mode". It's no fun to play chess against a computer, you'd lose every time, so he probably has a mode that mimics human chess playing and allows for a more even playing field, so that people will actually play with him and it'll actually be fun for them. The surprise at her winning was probably him not expecting her to be able to beat that level, as he wasn't aware she was good at chess.

Either that, or 3D chess really does have components to it that the cold logic of a machine can't mimic, meaning that a machine can never e as good at it as a humanoid. (Remember, Kirk frequently beat Spock at the game, and Spock probably approached it far more mechanically than Kirk did.)
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Outsider65
Thu, Apr 13, 2017, 9:29am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S3: Menage a Troi

Okay, regardless of how you feel about the character or her age, can we all just admit that Troi's mom looks better at 60 than most people do at 20? Having someone that age dress like that effectively makes her feel "alien" and shows who the character is, so after the initial shock I don't mind.

Actually, I wish this actress got more respect, she always seems to be playing Trek characters that are constantly romantically rejected and treated as annoying or unwanted for having those feelings (Nurse Chapel, Mama Troi, heck and probably even the computer if it ever gained sentience and started hitting on Data). She's an attractive woman and a good actress, why couldn't she have more roles like in the original TOS pilot, where she played the 1st officer? It just seems a weird way to typecast Roddenberry's wife (obviously he found her attractive). Did she like these roles or something along those lines?
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Outsider65
Wed, Apr 12, 2017, 9:20pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Starship Mine

I could pick at all the holes (why didn't Data jump the other goon when he had his back turned dealing with Riker?) but I was mildly entertained so I feel forgiving of this episode.

I was a little impressed with Picard. None of the bad guys made it off alive. And poor Hutch shouldn't have been killed off. Also, someone needs to teach Data the concept of personal space. Standing right up against Picard in the elevator scene was kind of strange behavior even in the context of his experiment.
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Outsider65
Mon, Apr 10, 2017, 9:28pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Tapestry

I thought this was a pretty meh episode. ("Meh" being the noise one makes when particularly disinterested in something.) Seeing Q poke at Picard was amusing but overall the episode wasn't engaging, Picard's friends weren't interesting, and seeing Picard declare his alternate self a loser whose life wasn't worth living was just depressing. (Is it just me or is Picard always ready to kill any version of himself that doesn't live up to his own standards?) A very boring Picard episode. And yes, watching Picard romance a woman young enough to be his granddaughter will never get any less disturbing.

Best parts:

The idea of Picard spending eternity with Q. (Knowing how fond Q seems to be of him, Q very well could be serious when he says that. I'd be a little more afraid of dying now if I were Picard.)

Picard waking up next to Q. Who doesn't love the scenes where Q gets in Picard's space just to make him uncomfortable?
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Outsider65
Mon, Apr 10, 2017, 1:31am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Aquiel

Another "ghost story but in outer space". Really? These episodes are always cliched and don't fit withe the overall tone of the series.

I saw the dog coming from a mile away. The second they showed it with Geordi I knew. It's such an old cliche.

Does Geordi have to be a stalker every time a woman is involved? Normally I like Geordi, but episodes where he gets "romantically interested" in someone make me hope said romantic interest is equipped with a rape whistle and some mace. Wesley was right about the guy always finding his women on the holodeck. They still haven't explained his appalling lack of common sense when it comes to women, either. I mean, he seems otherwise socially normal. Then again, his best friend is a robot and Picard did have to order him to befriend Barclay (arguably not too different from Geordi) so maybe not...
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Outsider65
Mon, Apr 10, 2017, 1:02am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Face of the Enemy

Sirtis was great as a Romulan. She really sold me as being strong and dangerous despite her statue and build. Didn't realize she could act so well, as soon as she went back to being "Troi" she immediately became dull and boring again and I realized how criminally underused this actress has been. Why did they ever cast her as counselor when she auditioned for chief of security? They could have merged the roles and had a Betazoid tactician and spared us the horrendous acting of that blonde chick from season 1 altogether. Seriously, the only good thing about that chick were all the robotsexual jokes we got to make about her.

I kind of enjoy watching Romulans interact, they're the only species on Trek that seems to have more female leaders than male and zero considerations of gender when it comes to rank. Betazoids are from what I remember a female-dominated society but in name only, we never actually see that being true, or rather we never see them interacting amongst themselves as a group to see if it's true. Troi's such a weak character you'd think she was raised Ferengi, seeing her step up as a Romulan and actually be a leader instead of acting all dull and passive felt like the character was finally, albeit briefly, embracing her heritage.
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Outsider65
Mon, Apr 10, 2017, 12:45am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Birthright, Part II

Boring episode. I'd have rather watched Data paint and angst over his dreams some more for 45 minutes. I never did understand why they didn't just let Worf go other than for the sake of drama-did he ever show an inclination to reveal them? The "love interest" was unlikeable and whiny, not the sort of strong woman Klingon males are supposedly attracted to and certainly not the sort Worf's been shown to be into. Would have been so much better without that plot line. Zero mention of Alexander or Worf's previous lover-did he forget them? He has no qualms about dying here and orphaning Alexander. (He's such a horrible parent, he probably knows Troi will do a better job than him anyway.) Worf pretends to be a Klingon expert and never once mentions he's adopted. I could pick holes in this all day.

No big questions about him coming back on a Romulan ship? Even if you dont care where the other Klingons came from, shouldnt they be questioning what a starfleet officer is doing hanging out with enemies? On the bright side, I don't think that Yridian got his money...
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Outsider65
Mon, Apr 10, 2017, 12:06am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Birthright, Part I

Not sure why they did the Data subplot only to completely drop it during the second part of this "two-parter". They could have made it a character developing moment but instead it came off as "oh by the way Data can do this now too isn't that cool okay back to Worf". Do androids dream of electric sheep? Apparently not. The "dreams" were more interesting when they appeared to be some sort of near death experience, they should have gone with that and pushed it to being the main plot.

The doctor from the other show showing up and screwing around in sickbay without authorization was stupid. If we're supposed to consider the guy competent shouldn't he be shown following the rules, or at least breaking them for a reason other than "oops I guess I forgot lol court marshals don't happen to main characters."

Okay, it was a little funny watching the guy having a severe crush on Data, and Data's reactions to it (in some scenes he's got that insufferably smug look he sometimes gets (how did Spiner get away with that, I wonder), in others he seems severely weirded out by it). But I could've sworn in a previous episode Data stated his hair didn't grow, and given how long Lore survived in space I think he's under exaggerated how much he doesn't need to "breath". (Now that we're explicitly told he apparently has a "respiratory system" that cools internal components like the fans on a pc I imagine him periodically popping himself open and having a go at it with some canned air---too funny! No wonder he was trying to figure out how to sneeze back in season 1.)

We never did find out what that machine actually was. A machine that makes robots dream, I guess. Looks like the doctor was way off the mark on it being a medical scanner.

I'm getting a little bored of Worf's Klingon storylines by now. We get it, he has issues, but quit bringing them up unless you're going to show him working past them, he's getting stagnate. I'll admit, it's a little fun seeing Worf enjoying plastic pasta and roughing up some ugly alien, but once he actually found the Klingons things got pretty dull.
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Outsider65
Sat, Mar 25, 2017, 5:58pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: In Theory

What always got me was that Jenna liked Data for who he normally was, but once they started "dating" he wrote a program that altered his behavior (in pretty creepy ways, IMO) and that program lead ultimately to her ending it. He is capable of having "friendships" without acting too strange so if he had approached this as just another relationship things might have turned out differently.

For Jenna's part I have no idea what she was thinking, were her experiences with men really so bad that she decided to try robosexuality? I guess after her bad experiences she might see Data as a "safe" choice because deep down she knows he's not capable of getting emotionally invested, and that he'd be straightforward with her and not cheat or play games. If Yar had spread around rumors after their liaison I could see some of the crew members pursuing him out of curiosity (or maybe not, I'm sure the holodeck could do a lot better) but Jenna seemed only to be seeking emotional intimicy (something she knew he couldn't give her), not a physical relationship. I've never bought any of Data's "romances" with humanoids (Yar comes close but that's because it wasn't really "romance") and want to see him try pursuing a relationship with, say, the ship's computer or another robot (he has shown to have a greater affinity for other machines than even his closest "friends").

Maybe we should be grateful the relationship never took a physical turn, but at the same time I was curious as to how that would play out if it had. How does Data feel about being "fully functional" when it's such a useless "function" for him to have? What was Soong thinking? Does this mean Lore is "fully functional" as well? Why are his robots even anatomically correct? The implications are so hilarious and disturbing I'm (not quite) sorry it wasn't brought up again.
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Outsider65
Sat, Mar 25, 2017, 3:56pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Chain of Command, Part I

Picard is so old, sending him on a black-ops mission seemed kind of odd, even of he was an expert in the technobabble of the week. His explanations to the others were so simple they could have easily trained someone more fit for the task to go. Having Crusher there was laughable, shouldn't they have brought an expert on bio-weapons instead, or at least a more action-oriented character? Worf I could understand, but a giant Klingon isn't exactly sneaky. (Fiction always likes to have the laughably unrealistic premise of 6'+ guys somehow fitting into and crawling through tiny spaces though.) This was just a setup to get Picard in a tormented position again, because Patrick Stewart is so good at being tortured. (Between this and BoBW how is Picard not mentally fractured beyond repair or at least severely PTSD?)

I loved Jellico telling Troi to put a real uniform on. Those onesies made her look UGLY, they cut into her in all the wrong places and made her figure look terrible, she looks like a real babe in normal clothes. Now maybe the character can finally get some respect.
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Outsider65
Sat, Mar 25, 2017, 2:56pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Rascals

The boy playing young Picard was dreadful - very wooden, and he sounded like he had a different British accent than Picard (or maybe his inflection was really just that off). That makes the episode very hard to watch, this kid didn't convince me he was Picard. The girl playing young Guinan was good, though, and the other two were passable. (The Ro girl was unpleasantly shrill, but I think that was just her voice).

Is it just me or was one of the ferengi (the engineer?) played by a woman? That would be a hilarious meta bit of irony, having members of this incredibly misogynistic species depicted by women, and would make sense cast-wise since ferengi are short.
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Outsider65
Sat, Mar 25, 2017, 5:39am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: True Q

@Luke

I'm not a fan of unnecessary regulation, but I think in the case of environment it's warranted. Lots of people don't care about the environment because they're either idiots or they'll be dead before what they're doing has a big enough impact to effect them. I don't think holding manufacturers to a certain standard or even mandatory recycling is necessarily a bad thing. (You might be saying "whoa, what right has the government to tell me what to do with my garbage!?" but they already do tell you what to do with it, littering is a crime and it must be taken to the dump or gotten rid of some other way on your own private land. Requiring you to sort and place your trash in different areas of the dump is also required so having you place some of that trash in recycling instead isn't that much more work. Curbside recycling is just as convenient as curbside trash.)
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Outsider65
Sat, Mar 25, 2017, 4:57am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: A Fistful of Datas

Normally I'm childishly amused by such things, but Data-in-drag was a thing of horrors. (Don't get me wrong it was hilarious in its own way, just in the way that makes you scream/yell incredulously instead of laugh.) Worf and I had the same look on our faces as we realized the program might not end until he kissed the love-interest. Wish this had followed up with an episode or two of Worf being very avoidant to an increasingly puzzled android.

I kept wanting Worf to shoot one of the Datas just to see what would happen to it. (Would the holo deck simulate blood, would it "die", or would it just be mildy annoyed with a hole in it?) Or alternately, go around turning them all off (surely the chief of security knows about the odd off switch by now for safety reasons after Data's taken over or otherwise been a major threat to ship multiple times?)

Glad to see Troi out of the sausage suit and doing something cool for once, even if it wasn't much. (She looks so terrible in that suit, I cheered when she was ordered to put on a proper uniform a few episodes after this (and I miss the weird manskirts background characters wore in the first season.))

Also, "y'all" is a contraction of "you all", but no one called Data out on this because "it's Western" and he can apparently speak all languages perfectly except English (he speaks "Western" just fine, though). I doubt those Christmas lights in his head are as efficient as he claims they are if holodeck characters have a better grasp of language than he does.
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Outsider65
Sat, Mar 25, 2017, 4:06am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: The Quality of Life

Terrible episode. Once again one of the mains is allowed to violate orders with zero repercussions, not even a slap on the wrist. Glad to know that Data finds "possible" life to be of greater value than the lives of his captain and best friend. He'd probably abandon his stupid quest for humanity at the first chance to join the robot uprising. Where's his sense of duty to Starfleet and his fellow officers? The implications of how untrustworthy Data is are astounding but of course will never be addressed. I'm not sure the episode realizes how sinister Data comes off, but it does lead me to doubt he's as benevolent to his creators as he lets on. Maybe he's only out there with them to find a robotic race to join. Though Data is accepted and treated as a Starfleet member, his willingness to abandon that for any old toaster that reminds him of himself is both chilling and foolhardy.

The exocomp design is so bad, it looks like it belongs on TOS. Can't believe something so cheap and fake was unironically used in a TV show during the 90s. Even Red Dwarf had better designs, and they were meant to be a parody of old cheap-looking crap sci-fi!

Also, and I know all Trek writers failed even middle school science, but viruses aren't considered life.

I think it's pretty stupid that Trek expects humans not to value their own species above others yet depicts Data doing the exact same thing in a positive light.

I agree with what others have said, Data is way too emotional and unobjective in this one, to the point of making some very irrational and selfish choices. I know he's never been as truly emotionless as claimed but he usually operates with a bit more sense and logic than this.

Even if the exocomps are "sentient" (and the episode made no good argument they were, which is probably why I dislike the episode so much (well, that and Data being a traitor and getting away with it (objecting is one thing, but mutiny is unacceptable, if he had been able to talk his way through instead I'd probably be ok with the episode despite the lack of convincing argument))) there's not a good reason to assume they're "enslaved". They're programmed to serve a purpose and are fulfilling that purpose, and for a machine (and even for men) what could be a greater life than fulfilling your purpose? Data and everyone else are anthropomorphicizing these bots in assuming they are all unhappy just because they were never given a career choice. (Funny that Data himself is doing so, doesn't he realize not all robots are made in the image of man and designed to think and act like man the way he is?) Indeed, the one that broke its own control circuits to avoid being ordered where it would get blown up later restored the circuit so it could be remote controlled again! If it were unhappy being a tool wouldn't it instead leave the circuit broken and go off doing whatever it pleased rather than making itself serviceable again? It could have attempted to communicate in some way to prove its sentience, but made zero attempt to do so. It was happy to continue its work, it just didn't want to blow up. The doctor had the right idea of just being "more careful" with them in the future, becoming useless would certainly not make the little bots happy. (Data is always searching for a sense of purpose, you'd think he of all people would put his personal feelings aside and understand this.)

Conversely, if the one that had blown itself up HAD done so out of a sense of despair, then that proves these little tools made to use screwdrivers in tight spaces were already (quite implausibly) MUCH more emotionally advanced than Data (a robot designed to actually be human-like, albeit without emotions (possibly as a safety procedure after the predecessor turned out emotionally unstable)) in terms of emotional ability and thus actually MORE sentient and human than he was. If Data had realized this I doubt he'd be so gungho to save them (his reaction to Locutus calling him "obsolete" was to take off his arm after all, and he fixated on Lore's supposed superiority for whole seasons, he doesn't seem to like being made to feel like an inferior piece of technology).

I don't really understand the "we love cats and dogs, but enjoy steaks at the same time" argument to say we are somehow worse creatures for it. We are animals, omnivores, and like it or not we need to eat other animals in order to survive. A cat or dog has no problem killing and eating a rabbit after torturing and terrorizing it for their own amusement, and while I know there are some sick people out there who probably do wound an animal and enjoy its suffering most people try to kill pretty quickly when hunting, rather than toying with a dying animal for hours and then leaving its mangled body to suffer a slow death because we were bored and needed the stimulus. I'm not saying that cats/dogs are evil (or that all humans live up to our own moral standards, although most probably are mostly capable of it if they choose). Animals don't function at the level we do, and concepts such as "good" and "evil" are beyond them. You can train your pet not to do these things, but you cannot teach it that doing so is "evil", just that it displeases you. Animals are often more intelligent than we give them credit for and are capable of nuanced relationships with each other and even other species, but they don't have the capacity to sit down and look at themselves and ask "is what I'm doing good or evil?" Even if they had the language to express such a sentiment the concept is entirely foreign to them and I'm doubtful even something as intelligent as a gorilla or dolphin could be taught to truly grasp the concept (maybe "good" and "bad" as in "this is pleasing" and "this is not pleasing", but not a greater, actual sense of morality). Animals are known to behave altruistically and selflessly, as well as to do terrible things, but in the end neither proves they have a morality. Humans however do have a sense of morality, of good and bad, and have the power to change their environment. That's why we should (and I'd even say it's our responsibility to do so) take good care of other creatures and our planet, because we are aware of ourselves and what is right and wrong, and can kill our prey with as little suffering as possible, and maintain our natural resources wisely. I know a lot of eco-nuts would just say we're a cancer on the planet and should off ourselves, but we deserve to live just as much as any other animal. (And I know someone is probably going to mention relativism and how "good and evil are totally subjective, man", but I'd argue that objective standards can be reached based off of our own knowledge and studies, for example, "raping someone harms their body and mind and so shouldn't be allowed", "animals feel pain so we should take care to minimize their suffering", etc etc.)

@John Oct 13 '15

It's late and your description of the whole situation and what you'd do in Riker's position has had me in stitches for at least 5 minutes. Kudos
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Outsider65
Fri, Mar 24, 2017, 1:49pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Time's Arrow, Part I

I have to note the similarities and differences between Data's desire for death in this episode and Asimov's character's desire for death in The Positronic Man (I believe that's the name of the story I'm thinking of? It's been years since I've read that story and even longer since I completely watched through the almost unwatchable TV adaptation, "Bicentennial Man". (I'm not a fan of Robbin Willliams, his way of speaking and acting in pretty much everything I ever saw/heard him in always made me feel very embarrassed by/for and very bad for him, as though he hated himself and was willing to do any humiliating or self-defacing thing to make me laugh. I felt like I was watching a man with little to no self respect/esteem torture himself for my amusement, it's very hard to watch. Given how things turned out I wonder if my feelings weren't too far off the mark, poor man.)

Data makes for a poor Bicentennial Man. Given what I remember of the story, in that one the robot chose to die so that he would be granted human status. In this episode Data is happy to learn he will die because it makes him feel closer to his human companions. In Asimov's story it makes sense, because the robot has done everything possible to make himself as human as possible, and dying from old age is just the final step. It makes less sense for Data to want to die, especially since his death is not a natural one (despite what he claims unless he's replacing/upgrading his parts as he goes along he will wear out and naturally "die" some time in the distant future) but shown to be a seemingly violent end. For all he knows he may be no more long lived than a humanoid like Guinan, not knowing the length of his life-span hardly means he's immortal and is a really illogical conclusion for him to come to. Even if he was "immortal" he's still obviously able to be destroyed, just like anything else. If existing indefinitely truly disturbed him enough that finding his own remains comforted him, he could have just as easily decided that one day he will have himself destroyed (I don't recall any of his programming making him unable to do so). There are species in Star Trek that do appear to live forever, like the Q, so fixating on having a death at all reflects his desire for humanity, rather than a desire for becoming "alive". It is an interesting look at the character, but really cements how odd some of his conclusions are.

@Ross I don't remember the exact lines, but it's possible Whitley was a secretary or the like, and thus while frequently talked to wasn't important enough to be introduced by name or was introduced by first name only. I'm not saying they didn't fudge it with Data (they do slip up and I think someone mentioned Spiner would ocassionally throw in some contractions just to see if they'd catch it (they didn't)) just that we could probably imagine a plausible explanation in this case.
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Outsider65
Fri, Mar 24, 2017, 12:44pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Man of the People

I just realized Troi becoming "oversexed" actually makes sense given her rapid aging and Betazoid women's hyped up sex drive when they reach middle age. I loved how all her outfits looked like something her mother would wear. Not saying this was a great episode, I'm pretty sick of Troi getting mind raped, but it did have a few amusing moments.

I always got the impression background characters were trying really hard to ignore their superiors' embarrassing/inappropriate antics out of respect or fear, rather than being truly unreactive.
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Outsider65
Thu, Mar 23, 2017, 11:54pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Schisms

@ comments about Data and Pulaski (yeah I know I'm 5 years and 50 comments too late)

Pulaski didn't hate Data, though. Sure, she gave him a hard time (given her character's similarities to Bones' and Data's to Spock's she pretty much had to), but they were clearly friends and it was fun to see someone always putting him on his toes and challenging him. None of Data's other friendships had that nice back and forth, and it's not like he couldn't take a little ribbing (I don't recall her being actually mean to him at any point, either). I also liked her relationship with Picard, I could have totally bought it developing into romantic tension (personally I never saw any chemistry between Beverly and Picard).

Ok, the actual episode:

Why so many creepy episodes these last few seasons? Sure this one succeeded in being spooky but it always feels off to me when Star Trek tries to be The Twilight Zone. It's just so far from what they're usually off doing. Episodes like this just seem to clash with the worldview Trek usually puts on.

I did enjoy Data's poetry, especially the way he made sure to remind Riker to come. (I thought it was pretty brilliant, especially the first one that was probably describing an actual event (how many times in previous seasons did people ask Data to shut up in not so many words?), although the Spot one is a close second. I love little continuity nods like that, especially when they tie-in to character growth.) I wonder if anyone there was genuinely interested and didn't just come to avoid hurting his feelings, the whole room looked ready to fall asleep. I'm endlessly amused by the irony in that. I also enjoyed the scene where Geordi tries desperately to avoid hurting Data's non-feelings.

The rest of the episode, I'm not sure about. Like I said, I'm not sure how to take episodes like this.
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