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Linda
Wed, Aug 2, 2017, 1:12pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S7: Drive

Glad to find out this episode was filmed before “Imperfection.” I thought I noticed Tom wearing a wedding ring in that episode.

And I’ve always wondered why B’Elanna wasn’t more involved in Tom’s holo adventures. I would have thought that a pilot and a chief engineer would have found sharing those episodes interesting as well. There were times during the three years worth of episodes that I couldn't tell if they were still together.
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Linda
Fri, Jul 7, 2017, 6:17pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S2: The 37's

This is the last episode of Voyager I saw during its original run. I had seen a few early episodes and was not particularly impressed. When I saw the promo about Amelia Earhart, I thought this could be fun. After viewing, I never watched Voyager again, until 2017.

My thinking: They took a renowned female adventuress and had her CHOOSE to stay on that planet, after seeing the interior of a spaceship? Really? Yeah, I know AE was not going to become a member of the crew. But why not at least have AE say something like, “People used to tell me I had no business with my head up in the clouds. And now I see that they were right. I should have been reaching for the stars. I’ve got so much to learn, but when I do, you just wait Kathryn Janeway, one day I’ll be racing you back to earth! We’ll see who gets there first! You just wait!” Yeah, that would have been too cheesy. Never mind.
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Linda
Sat, Jul 1, 2017, 12:53pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S7: Preemptive Strike

Chrome, you said:
"That's fine if you personally disagree with Picard, but he's obviously the protagonist of this show, just as Kirk or Janeway are of their shows. The audience does not expect the protagonist to be dead wrong. "

I don’t know. A lot of people disagree with Janeway, wholeheartedly, all the time. And I have realized that a lot of people hold Picard in such high esteem, maybe more than I do. And yes this may seem like a slap in the face. It was a jarring moment, but Picard is human, and that’s not a crime. For me, the way the writers had written it, (stacked the deck, I called it) Ro being torn, I wasn’t surprised at the end. I thought the episode was done well.

On 6/29/17 you said: "because typically characters do come to see that Picard is right on a TNG show. The audience's expectation is that Ro too would come to see the light …"

And the very next TNG show I saw was Ethics, and it was exactly as you described, Picard was right and directed Crusher and Riker to his views.

For me, comparing your view of Preemptive Strike and mine, I see it mirrored in the comments all the time. An episode is what an episode is. But every viewer brings along their own unique perspective, so much that sometimes we can have very different opinions of the same episode. I understand your point and I respect it.
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Linda
Fri, Jun 30, 2017, 10:29pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: Ethics

Crusher or Pulaski, I actually don’t have a preference.

In the scene where Crusher and Picard discuss Worf’s medical condition, Crusher speaks of the lengths that she will go to keep Worf from committing suicide. She is clearly emotional, Worf is not just a patient but a friend. The tactics she speaks of using are tactics, which some feel are ethically debatable. But it’s all talk and possibilities on her part. They are not tactics that she ever engages. To me, she is talking through her problem, trying to wrap her head around Worf’s decision, and Picard helps her come to the decision not to employ them.

Riker brings the dagger to Worf and expresses extreme dismay and disgust at the request. He dramatically leaves the dagger as a signal that he, Riker, has no desire to be a part of this process. He leaves the dagger, on the bed at Worf’s feet. Would Worf’s injury prevent him from retrieving the knife from the foot of the bed where Riker left it? Apparently not. Later Worf gives the dagger to his son and tells him to bring it back to their quarters. Clever. Riker refused to participate in the suicide ritual, but gave Worf the ability to carry out the deed if he so wished.

To me the biggest problem I had with Crusher was that she tells Worf immediately upon his waking up after the accident:

Crusher: I'm afraid there's no way we can repair this kind of injury.

And yet the very next thing we hear is:
Captain's log, stardate 45587.3. Lieutenant Worf has been removed from active duty following a severe injury. Although a neuro-specialist has arrived, Doctor Crusher believes his paralysis may be permanent.

“May be permanent.” I’m thinking that Crusher essentially flat out tells Worf, we can’t fix this, you’ll always be like this. When really, she hasn’t finished assessing the situation yet. The diagnosis was premature.
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Linda
Fri, Jun 30, 2017, 9:09pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S7: Preemptive Strike

By saying I think the writers stack the deck, I don’t mean that as an insult. IMO, all writers stack the deck. Good writing is when the viewer or reader doesn’t see it as stacked. IMO, good writing is not cut and dried. It often leaves room for interpretation and discussion.

I’ve come to realize that I am of that subset of Star Trek viewers who doesn’t necessarily buy into “Gene Roddenberry’s vision.” And though I often agree with Picard, I don’t necessarily anticipate that he is going to be always right. Indeed, often in an episode, he seems to be learning about the topic, just as the viewer is.

Back in January of 2015 Niall asked: how does Ro explain herself to her Maquis colleagues at the end? How does she explain how she knew about the Starfleet armada in the nebula? How does she explain the disappearance of her "Bajoran relative" and the loss of her ship?

I wonder that too, especially the first time I saw this episode. I wonder if Ro can be honest with them and I hope she can because I think her own code of conduct requires it.
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Linda
Thu, Jun 29, 2017, 11:57am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S7: Preemptive Strike

I’ve always felt Picard totally misjudged this situation. I think he should have known he was putting Ro in an impossible situation where she might question loyalties and ultimately join the Maquis. Not only does he do an injustice to Ro by helping to recruit her for this role, he also puts Starfleet’s efforts to get the Maquis in jeopardy. Then again, he was only following orders.

When Picard proposes to Ro the Federation plan to trap the Marquis, he threatens her with a court-martial if she doesn’t carry out her assigned orders. He should have known from his previous interactions with Ro that this threat would be useless on her. Insulting even. Ro had shown that she had her own values and personal codes that she honored above all else. On the prior occasion, Ro’s stance happened to coincide with Picard’s. It was because of that common ground that Picard decided to help Ro in her Starfleet career. And because of that developed relationship that Ro felt a debt to Picard.

It may seem not worth mentioning, but: That scene where Picard is telling Ro the plan to trap the Maquis: Picard and Ro, to camouflage their true conversation, playact that Picard is a john negotiating for Ro’s services. When their Starfleet business is done, Picard ends the playact by loudly rebuffing Ro, essentially publically humiliating her. Yes it was only play acting. But to someone like Ro, I think it would have hit too close to home. Might have shaken the connection she felt to Picard a bit.

Then again the writers were heavy handed. They showed ample valid reasons why the Marquis were going after the Cardassians. Rather than investigate the Marquis claims, Starfleet felt the best course of action was eliminate the Marquis. The writers stacked the deck for Ro to join the Maquis.
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Linda
Mon, Jun 26, 2017, 3:03pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S5: The Begotten

Chrome,

Thanks for the answer. I agree that Quark and Odo share a unique connection, and that Odo would be interested in collecting artifacts of the family he can no longer be with. A dead changeling still seems to be an unusual offer. I might think there might be some sort of legalities about selling alive or dead changelings, a sentient being. But then I’m strange that way. And of course, this is Quark, if there were legalities, he still would be undeterred. Thanks.
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Linda
Sun, Jun 25, 2017, 8:43am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S5: The Begotten

Chrome, you said,

“Sisko's pressure on Odo is really just a catalyst to get Odo to see that Dr. Mora wasn't such a bad guy, and that his methods, while objectively cruel, were at least humanely reasonable given Mora's circumstances.”

I agree. Most of this episode seemed to be about the reconciliation between Odo and Mora. Early on, combined with the B story of Kira giving birth, it seemed like it might tell a tale about the parallels of those births. When the changeling died, it looked like it might be going for a statement contrasting birth and death. And then at the very end, Odo and Kira, each absorbed in their own dramas and musings, went for a walk, together. Some really good stuff.

I am wondering though, other than getting things started, why would Quark think that Odo would be interested in purchasing a dead changeling?
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Linda
Sun, Jun 25, 2017, 8:12am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S5: The Begotten

Peter G.,

Some people see the glass as half full. Others see the glass as half empty. And another might say, “What in the world is in that glass? OMG! It’s a baby shapeshifter!”

Pretty sure you’ve changed my opinion as much as I’ve changed yours. I guess you and I can agree to disagree.
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Linda
Sat, Jun 24, 2017, 10:21am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S5: The Begotten

@ Peter G.,

Certainly I don’t think the baby changeling belongs to Odo because Odo paid for it. Indeed I doubt that Odo was aware of the financial transaction, he was too distracted. I think it’s very telling that Sisko relays his message from “Starfleet”, the military arm, and not “the Federation”, the diplomatic arm. But who really has jurisdiction? According to my information, although Sisko commands DS9, the station actually belongs to the inhabitants of nearby Bajor. Perhaps we’ll need to consult with the prophets.

Then again, why bother? Starfleet apparently has carte blanche to do as it pleases. Obviously I’m not inclined to assume that Starfleet has a purely benevolent disposition in this matter. My historical knowledge of DS9 may be flawed, but I believe that “at this point in history” changelings have been identified as potential enemies, and I don’t think it’s unreasonable to think this fact would be considered in this matter.

When Quark offered to sell Odo what Quark believed to be a dead changeling, Quark, as presumably a sales ploy, suggested that the Founders would definitely be interested in acquiring it. Why Odo would be interested in purchasing a dead changeling, I never had time to contemplate, since Odo immediately identified it as alive.

As a live and sentient being, one would presume that the baby would naturally be returned to its family. But it was also almost immediately identified as having been cast aside by the Founders in an effort to gauge how another race treats the weak and vulnerable. Personally I think it says a lot more about the Founders that they would cast a baby out in such a manner. And it would therefore seem doubtful that the Founders would be first choice when looking out for the best interests of this baby. (This may be “unsubstantiated speculation”, but I think we’re to believe it’s true. Odo is the one who says it and as far as I know he’s usually a trustworthy source.)

It is my (perhaps incorrect) understanding that shapeshifters such as Odo are rare among humanoids: to the extent that it was only by trial and error that Dr. Mora had any success with Odo. As per Odo’s statements, some of Mora’s procedures were painful, intrusive and pretty much worthless. Therefore Mora’s assistance to Odo about techniques to use on the baby was based on limited knowledge: if it worked on Odo, then it would therefore work on this baby. I would question this assumption. Odo and the baby were of the same species yes, but each had its own unique circumstances and this baby had recently been treated for (insert techno-babble here) and was still under a doctor’s (Bashir’s) care.

If I’m right that shapeshifters were unique in the humanoid world, I would assume that there would be limited options of who would or could best look after such a baby. Was there anyone else in the entire Federation who had first-hand knowledge and dealings with changelings, other than Odo and/or Mora? To my knowledge, no. It is possible that because of his painful recollections of his early experiences with Mora, Odo may have been too tentative in his dealings with the baby. And perhaps the two acting in tandem might have been the best course. Maybe. We’ll never really know the roads that we did not travel.

I have the feeling that the major difference between your view and mine is that you’re more certain of the benevolence of Starfleet than I am. With all due respect to Gene Roddenberry, from what I’ve observed in ST, I’m more skeptical. Or maybe that’s just my nature.

If it’s your point, that Starfleet dictated the fate of the changeling, I agree with you 100 percent. Whether Starfleet would necessarily have acted in the best interests of the baby changeling is, I think, a very different question. Sisko makes it very clear early on Starfleet’s agenda:

SISKO: How long before it is able to take humanoid form?
ODO: Several months. Why?
SISKO: Well, there's still a lot we don't know about your people. The changelings could provide Starfleet with invaluable information about the Dominion.
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Linda
Fri, Jun 23, 2017, 10:52am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S5: The Begotten

Chrome, it’s probably been over 20 years since I’ve seen an episode with Hugh the Borg. I’d forgotten his youth and much of the circumstances of his initial interaction with the Enterprise. A lot could be said about Hugh—over 100 comments on “I, Borg” alone. But given the situation, proper precautions needed to be taken when he was first beamed onto the Enterprise, and they were.

And pretty much the same could be said for the baby changeling: as long as Odo continued to take responsibility for it, and it was in a place where its life signs were continually monitored by the computer, proper precautions were being taken and I think it would have been premature for Starfleet to take custody of it.

In the “The Abandoned” episode, Odo had lobbied for Starfleet to give the young Jem’Hadar a chance to develop into something other than an aggressive being. In this episode, Odo makes no such pleas or arguments. Either it was ground the writers didn’t want to cover again, or Odo learned something from his earlier experience.

Now at the time that Sisko issued his statement about Starfleet, Odo had yet to have any result from his efforts. One would assume that after the baby changeling began responding to him and a relationship was forged, Odo would have been very vocal if Starfleet tried to take possession. Still, one could argue that once Odo and Mora “stepped up” their interactions on the baby changeling, which was being monitored for medical reasons per Dr. Bashir, that such activity could have led to it ultimately succumbing, since it was already in a weakened state. But since the baby changeling absorbed itself into Odo, it obviously didn’t hold any grudges. All’s well that ends well, I guess.
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Linda
Thu, Jun 22, 2017, 3:28pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S5: The Begotten

Chrome, wasn’t Hugh the Borg a member of the collective that had been assimilating other species? Obviously he’d fit the category of POW. This Changeling was a baby, essentially a blank page who had done nothing wrong. It was only wanted by Starfleet because of its species. Yeah, I get how dangerous it might be, one day, and why Starfleet would want to keep tabs on it. But to threaten to take the changeling, is something else. (And without an offer of reimbursement too!) And it sort of annoyed me that apparently Odo didn’t even think about giving the changeling a name. And Odo and Mora kept referring to the changeling as it. And so I have to as well.

I haven’t seen Chimera yet. But I thought this episode harkened back to The Abandoned in S3, about the Jem’Hadar that Odo raised, and no matter what Odo did, the Jem’Hadar seemed preprogrammed by the genetics of his species. Though Odo hasn’t turned against humans, I wouldn’t assume that this changeling would necessarily follow Odo’s lead. Starfleet is right to be watchful. Beyond that, I guess I can’t comment since it didn’t happen.
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Linda
Thu, Jun 22, 2017, 11:50am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S5: The Begotten

I saw very few episodes of DS9 during its original run and I probably wouldn’t be watching now if it wasn’t part of the ST block of shows presently on H&I, and if I wasn’t able to read the comments here. It’s pretty mind-blowing (and enjoyable) how the very same episode of ST can have totally opposite effects on viewers. And I sorta like the spoilers—or maybe just the enthusiasm of the commenters.

When Odo was telling the baby changeling about the joys of taking the various shapes, I wondered if Odo had better appreciation of being a changeling, now that he couldn’t be one. And when Sisko announced that, if results weren’t timely enough, Starfleet would take the changeling, I thought, can Starfleet just do that? With a sentient being, even if it is a changeling? Odo would be okay with that and allow it and not fight against it?

SISKO: Why would the Founders send such helpless creatures out into space?
ODO: To find out if the species they encountered posed any threat. What better way to gauge another race than to see how it treats the weak and vulnerable?

But I’m wondering if it was also somehow used to assess if other species would be vulnerable to a takeover.

Mora said Odo’s shape-shifting was somewhat limited. And I’m thinking maybe it was because Odo had Mora for a teacher, and because of the experiments Mora put him through. But even if so, Mora didn’t initially know what or who he was dealing with. It was good that Odo recognized the debt that he owed Mora, and that the two reconciled.

In his celebration with Quark, Odo said that now it wasn’t so bad being a solid any more. So I’m wondering if it was because being a solid was no longer such a punishment, and that Odo had a newer appreciation for the Changelings, if that was what allowed him to change back. Or maybe it was because for the very first time he’d experienced unconditional, unselfish love. Then again, all that seems too hokey. But during that first flight off the balcony, he certainly seemed to have found a better joy in being a Changeling than ever before.
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Linda
Tue, Jun 20, 2017, 11:51pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S5: The Darkness and the Light

A lot of people have pointed out a lot of plot holes, which I can’t argue with. But I still found the episode affecting, because of Kira’s last lines:

ODO: Why did he give you a sedative?
KIRA: He wanted to protect the innocent, and separate the darkness from the light. But he didn't realize, the light only shines in the dark, and sometimes innocence is just an excuse for the guilty.

Wow, 92 comments and I’m the only one who interprets these words to mean: Kira knew that she had used Prin’s concern and compassion for the innocent baby against Prin, and she wasn’t proud of it: the innocence of the baby was the excuse for Kira to beg for a mercy which Prin allowed, which resulted in Kira successfully fighting off Prin. IMO, with these words, Kira was acknowledging her guilt in the chaos that is war. Kudo’s to the writers (if my interpretation is correct).

I can’t help but also add, that if Kira would get reprimanded for the actions she took in going after Prin alone, I don’t think that it would be issued at that very moment, when they were concerned about Kira and the baby’s health, though maybe they could have hinted at. It would have happened later, off camera.

And at the very end, didn’t everybody beam out? Nobody waited for the local authorities or helped deal with Prin’s body? Not even Odo?
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Linda
Mon, Jun 19, 2017, 11:19pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: This Side of Paradise

Yes, you’re right, Corey. Spock explained that radiation killed the animals, but that the spores thrived on human bodies. I'm not exactly sure how that would work but obviously it did.
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Linda
Sun, Jun 18, 2017, 4:52pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S5: Latent Image

JANEWAY: It's as though there's a battle being fought inside him, between his original programming and what he's become. Our solution was to end that battle. What if we were wrong?
TORRES: We've seen what happens to him. In fact, we've seen it twice.
JANEWAY: Still, we allowed him to evolve, and at the first sign of trouble? We gave him a soul, B'Elanna. Do we have the right to take it away now?
TORRES: We gave him personality subroutines. I'd hardly call that a soul.

For me, this episode pretty much hit all the right notes. Doc is one of my favorite characters. But he started out as a hologram, not a sentient being. How and when did he become sentient? When his crewmates recognized him as such. He was created as a program and when that program did not operate as specified, files were deleted. However that solution did not last and another solution was necessary, one which recognized the uniqueness of the situation. My only quibble with the end, Janeway seemed intent on keeping watch over Doc herself. Doc probably would have benefited from interaction with all of the pertinent crew members, each sharing a unique perspective and offering differing coping mechanisms, and friendship.

And yes, Kes should have been present at that point in time (of the original event), but the result would have still been the same: Like Paris, Doc would have known that Kes would not have been able to properly perform the operation. It would have been Kes standing there where Paris had been.
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Linda
Sat, Jun 17, 2017, 6:14pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S5: Nothing Human

When Torres walked into sickbay spewing techno-babble, I sat up and took notice. But then the alien ripped through the force field and attached itself to Torres and I realized, yeah, that’s why the writers decided to have Torres give the info instead of Seven: They wanted Torres immobile on the table, not Seven.

I like Seven and the drama that the character creates. But since her appearance, all of the other characters have suffered in comparison. Which is particularly irksome, given that as early as the third episode of season one, the writers threw out the big conflict of Marquis vs Starfleet and made everyone a big happy family. Which in a way, they sort of harken back to here, in the form of the Bajoran crewmember, who if I’m not mistaken was originally Marquis.

And this episode never has Janeway acknowledge: they’re in this particular dilemma because Janeway followed her “instinct”, followed the “distress” message and had the alien beamed aboard, which led the Torres crisis.

The whole medical dilemma seemed forced to me, provoking comparisons with the Nazi experiments. And I didn’t think it was resolved particularly well. Ditto the resulting conflict between Torres and the captain. But this is Voyager after all.
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Linda
Thu, Jun 1, 2017, 10:12pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: The Enemy Within

An enjoyable episode, but highly implausible, that Kirk could be divided into 2 functional beings. I’m inclined to think the episode was going for a yin-yang moment: trying to show that opposite and contrary forces are really complementary, interconnected, and interdependent.

I also wasn’t swayed by Spock’s advice to Kirk (the good) not to reveal the truth to the crew:
Spock: You're the Captain of this ship. You haven't the right to be vulnerable in the eyes of the crew. You can't afford the luxury of being anything less than perfect. If you do, they lose faith, and you lose command.

It may only be the fifth episode of the series, but I’m pretty sure that the crew knows that Kirk is very human, and still an excellent captain.

And I found it funny that Kirk (the evil) is in Kirk’s quarters and finds makeup to cover the scratches. So men of the 23rd century wear makeup. Good to know.
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Linda
Wed, May 31, 2017, 1:56am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S4: Hard Time

So, TNG had “Justice”, Voyager had “Random Thoughts” and DS9 has “Hard Time".

Does anyone ever check what the local laws are and what the extreme penalties for simple offenses may be? I guess not. You'd think though, the topic might come up in a First Contact evaluation.

O’Brien’s crime?:
SISKO: He apparently got curious about some Argrathi technology and asked a few too many questions. The Argrathi security arrested him and charged him with espionage.




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Linda
Tue, May 23, 2017, 8:15pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: This Side of Paradise

What’s so bad about feeling good? The colonists had purpose enough to farm and cultivate food to live. Their health improved to a perfect condition. And they now knew the cure for it. (I would like to know what happened to the animals they’d brought with them. The answer given to that question was evasive.) It seems like the planet possibly could be developed for a recovery facility, under certain conditions. And it was good seeing Jill Ireland again.
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Linda
Tue, May 23, 2017, 2:08pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S4: Vis A Vis

So a few episodes ago, most of the crew was getting letters from home. Paris hadn’t gotten such a letter and if he would get one, he wasn’t sure it’d be something he’d want to read. So maybe he had that in his head and it affected him.

But even given that, this episode wasn’t at all compelling. There wasn’t even good techno-babble. And the alien may have also been a pilot, but didn’t Paris have to log into the computer with his own password at some point? How would the alien know that? And it doesn’t even matter. Time’s up, episode’s over. Doc’s fixes all off-camera and the reset button is hit. Hopefully we’re due for a better episode soon.

But I’ve got to agree with whoever about the comment about Paris’ duties in sickbay. It was one thing when he helped out because he had some basic first-aid knowledge. But the stuff Doc wants to teach now, I have to believe there’d be a better candidate than the ace pilot of the ship.
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Linda
Fri, May 19, 2017, 9:02am (UTC -6)
Re: ENT S3: North Star

It’s a mystery of the sort found on TOS. Kirk, I mean Archer, finds an earth-like planet inhabited by humans of the Wild West era, oppressing an alien race. Archer learns that nearly 300 years before, the alien race had abducted humans from Earth and brought them to this planet for slave labor. Somehow the humans defeated the technologically superior aliens and now oppresses them. No signs remain of the alien superior technology, except for a wrecked spaceship. After defeating the aliens, the humans have not progressed a bit in the 300 years: Their technology remains 6-shooters and horse transportation. I guess horses had also been abducted. The Wild West weapons don’t look 300 years old, so the humans must be able to manufacturer them …

Or maybe I’m thinking too much. There’s the obligatory checklist: Archer is imprisoned in jail, Archer gets into fist fights, Archer spends time with the pretty guest star, Archer makes a speech about tolerance.

There was a fun moment when, during the battle, a Wild West dude grabs T’Pol and uses her as a shield. Reed barely hesitates before shooting T’Pol with a phaser. She falls unconscious leaving the guy who’d grabbed her exposed and easily dealt with. Wait, aren't Vulcans suppose to be stronger and faster than humans? Nevermind. Two stars feels about right.
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Linda
Fri, May 19, 2017, 12:33am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S4: Retrospect

Janeway is so concerned that Borg elements may have been stolen from Seven. Then why was Seven ever alone with the alien? Recently Seven questioned why Tuvok was on a mission with her and Tuvok answered that it was standard procedure for two Starfleet personnel to be on missions, not just one. Yes, Paris was also on the planet, but I don’t think we know why he conveniently wasn’t with Seven for 2 hours. I guess it’s just not SOP for away team personnel to stay together.

This certainly wouldn’t be the first time that ST personnel were trusting of aliens who perhaps didn’t deserve it.

But for an alien whose business was dealing with customers, he had a very aggressive attitude. Maybe he didn’t do what Seven accused him of, but he certainly impatiently pushed her aside with little provocation. But maybe he wasn’t interested in developing a relationship for repeat business.

Or maybe I just found the writing of the set-up and resolution lacking.
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Linda
Tue, May 16, 2017, 10:05pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S4: Message in a Bottle

Jammer: “the overriding problem with "Message in a Bottle": its serious and emotionally gripping general premise is held back (and held back to a fault) by its utterly inconsequential action/comedy plot.” “This is an episode that, for all its merits, should've been so much more.”

I have to agree. It was a fun episode, but it could have been a lot more by episode’s end. Got to say though, a half-Klingon complaining about a former Borg being rude, and then giving lessons in courtesy, fun stuff.

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Linda
Fri, May 12, 2017, 10:04am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S1: Parallax

Chrome, I was also thinking about “Bread and Circuses.” But truthfully I think ST has always been a curious mix of many contradicting elements, and I don’t know how “Bread and Circuses” fits into Roddenberry’s overall views. As a kid, I watched TOS simply because we only had one TV in the house. But I later had friends who loved to get into conversations about Spock and ideals and stuff. I always wondered if sometimes they read more into ST than was actually there. Or saw in it, things that they wanted to see.
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