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Zakalwe
Sun, May 14, 2017, 4:45pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S5: The Begotten

Gooz I love the way you think.

But how do you know there wasn't a massive, steaming turd left behind inside the crumpled heap of his uniform?
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Zakalwe
Wed, Apr 19, 2017, 6:18pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: Shakaar

Small point of order regarding O'Brien and his forfeited match, as implied by Mr Rage above me, winning the match would not have been as straightforward a matter as just flinging an arrow with his good arm.

A game of darts must end on a double or the bullseye - a player has to hit one very specific (and very small) segment of the board - the exact double required depends on the player's score. The size of a double segment is approximately 50mm x 8mm (approximation is because naturally the segment is curved, the bullseye is even smaller) and the player throws from just under 2.5m away. Not even Phil Taylor, the 16-times world champion, could hit a specific double on demand with his non-dominant hand. I wouldn't even hit the board. Miles would have had more chance of accidentally flinging his tungsten shaft into Bashir's eye than winning the game once his shoulder had gone (on which note, nobody ever tore their rotator cuff being handed a cup of coffee, but that's another matter entirely).

Of course, it could be that they were playing space darts, in which case all bets regarding the rules are off...
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Zakalwe
Sun, Mar 12, 2017, 5:59pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S1: Emissary

Something else has just occurred to me, and I apologise if I'm repeating something said above, I've read many but not all the preceding comments.

Leaving aside the question of whether Sisko's reaction to Picard at their first meeting makes him a douchebag or not, that scene seems to be necessary from the perspective of selling one of the major themes of the episode; namely that Sisko hasn't moved on from the death of his wife. Since we know almost nothing about Sisko as this is the pilot, the revealing of his inability to move on from Jennifer's death during his later interaction with the Prophets has very little to back it up. The scene with Picard strongly hints at it.
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Zakalwe
Sun, Mar 12, 2017, 5:52pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S1: Emissary

Chrome that is an interesting point which I had not considered.

However, you are thinking in a detached and rational fashion. A man meeting the face of the entity that killed his wife for the first time (and your point that it wasn't actually Picard is taken) will most likely not be thinking coolly and logically and, I would say, deserves a bit of slack.
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Zakalwe
Sun, Mar 12, 2017, 3:35pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S1: Emissary

A man drives his car down the road, begins to feel unwell and suddenly has his first ever epileptic seizure at the wheel. Meanwhile you are crossing the road a little ahead of your spouse, who gets mowed down and killed by the sick driver. A little later you get to meet the driver. You know he was ill and that the accident was a terrible tragedy in which nobody could be blamed but do you really think you are not going to have negative emotions that might slip out during this encounter? And even if you don't, could you honestly blame anybody else in the same situation if they did?

I direct this analogy at the folk who were affronted by Sisko's reaction to Picard, which to my mind was rather restrained. Surely you can see, if you detach yourself from your admiration for the character of the Captain of the Enterprise, that Sisko's reaction was natural and understandable, even if you disagree with it?
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Zakalwe
Sun, Feb 5, 2017, 2:25pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S7: Inheritance

I enjoyed this episodes illustration of the fact that despite all of humanities' advances in the 24th century, medical ethics has regressed back to the Middle Ages.

So Crusher just divulges a woman's medical records to someone else, just because he asked.
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Zakalwe
Fri, Jan 27, 2017, 3:27pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Suspicions

One of the great things about being a Trek fan is that I enjoy it, even when it's iredeemably tutti.

My favourite nitpick in this one?

There's been a murder on board, suspects - including one who is known to be emotionally volatile - need to be questioned. The head of ship's security would go on to become a legendary hand-to-hand warrior and there is a frigging mind reader on board. So naturally the poxy doctor conducts the enquiry. Alone.
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Zakalwe
Wed, Jan 25, 2017, 5:50pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Lessons

I struggled to stay immersed in this one because of Wendy Hughes' hybrid Aussie/Yank accent. I don't blame the actress for not mastering an American drawl, but since "nationality" is basically a completely irrelevant concept in the 24th Century why couldn't they just let her speak with her native Australian accent? If on the other hand the producers were terrified that American audiences would somehow be unable to comprehend the weird and exotic tones emanating from the mouth of an Antipodean actress, why didn't they just cast a generic American? I assume there wasn't a shortage in the nineties?
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Zakalwe
Mon, Jan 2, 2017, 8:57am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: A Matter of Time

Rasmussen just isn't a believable character. As any fule kno, if you want to enrich yourself by stealing from the future, you need to find a bookshop that sells the Grays Sports Almanac.
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Zakalwe
Sat, Dec 31, 2016, 6:26am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: The Game

A pretty similar concept that predates this episode was shown in Red Dwarf, in a single episode subsequently expanded on significantly in the novel "Infinity Welcomes Careful Drivers". The crew gets hold of a game in the form of a headset that implants directly into the brain and leaves the players helplessly addicted - so much so that they are essentially crack addicts who would have died if not tended to by Kryten.

I mention this partly because "The Game" brought the Red Dwarf idea to my mind, but also because I recall an interview Patrick Stewart gave about RD. Now I think Stewart is a legend and not just for his TNG work, but in this interview he slightly moronically describes his first experience of RD, unexpectedly flicking the channel onto an episode and his immediate reaction was to pick up the phone to get onto a lawyer because he thought that RD was ripping off Star Trek. Anybody who has seen Red Dwarf will know how ludicrous that notion is. To be fair to Stewart he did then say that he started laughing and put the phone down when he saw what the show was actually about.
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Zakalwe
Thu, Dec 29, 2016, 12:36pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: In Theory

"She kissed me in the torpedo bay". Muhahahaha.

Yes I have the sense of humour of an adolescent with nae mates.
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Zakalwe
Wed, Dec 28, 2016, 4:43pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: The Nth Degree

The look of utter confusion bordering on disgust across Data's face when he was watching Barclay's awful performance at the beginning of the episode is priceless, had me in stitches.

As an aside, the recurrence of childish insults traded between (presumably) American) liberals and conservatives on here is quite tiresome. Not that you'll care, but the rest of the world had enough of it during your year long election campaign that culminated in the elevation of a narcissist clown to the highest office in the land. Give it a rest.
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Zakalwe
Wed, Dec 28, 2016, 3:31pm (UTC -5)
Re: Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

@Peremensoe

As I'm sure you appreciate, it's quite hard to imagine never having seen Episode IV, but whilst this film clearly leads almost immediately into that film and references other events and characters in the Star Wars universe, it has a self-contained plot that is perfectly understandable and easy to follow for anybody that's been living in a cave for 30 years. Clearly a Star Wars virgin would miss some references that are contained within the film (Bail Organa sending a message to Obi-Wan, the bloke with the squashed up nose and his mate who cameo early here and were in the Mos Eisley cantina in ANH and the appearance of Leia at the end to name but three) but none of these materially affect the story being told in this film.
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Zakalwe
Wed, Dec 28, 2016, 12:00pm (UTC -5)
Re: Star Wars: Episode I — The Phantom Menace

The flaws in this film are legion and have been neatly summarised above me. But for me what makes it utterly irredeemable is the racism, described above as casual, but no, it's actual flat out racism.

There's the devious, cowardly, sneaky, underhand, money-grabbing trade federation, who happen to have pseudo-Chinese accents.

Then there's devious, cowardly, sneaky, underhand, money-grabbing, slave-keeping Watto, complete with his Jewish-esque noggin and his Middle-Eastern accent.

And finally, Most notably of all, the biggest turd in the punchbowl of course is the black Caribbean stereotype of Jar-Jar Binks, which might have only been somewhat offensive if he wasn't also portrayed as being a completely malcoordinated numbskull.
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Zakalwe
Wed, Dec 28, 2016, 11:44am (UTC -5)
Re: Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

Nolan is spot on. I suspect those who haven't yet seen it will enjoy it more if they don't watch it with the preconception of it being a Star Wars movie, whilst accepting that it is packed full of little moments that are in there purely to delight proper Star Wars fans which might be missed by casuals (and I do not use the term perjoratively!).

I love the fact that this film does not shy-away from depicting the realities of war. It rips to shreds Lucas' childish notions of good vs evil and shows the rebels doing morally very questionable things for their cause, as is absolutely inevitable in a war of the sort of scale the Star Wars universe sells us. It also powerfully portrays the sacrifices that must be made in war by ordinary folk, whose names will not live on in legend or be documented in history books but whose efforts are nevertheless crucial in determining the eventual outcome of the conflict. Most people at the front lines of such battles don't come home at the conclusion, settle down with the family and live happily ever after.

I love the fact they dealt with one of the huge plot holes of the 1977 original, namely that the all-powerful Empire would build a decisive weapon with a single, exploitable flaw that could render it's utter destruction with one lucky (or force-guided) shot.

I love the fact they included Tarkin, despite the protests of some. Given that the original film established his presence on the Death Star and that he was basically (?equal) second in command of the entire Empire, he sort of had to be in the film. So he either had to be rendered in CGI in post production over an on-set actor or he had to be portrayed by another actor entirely. Given Peter Cushing's incredibly distinctive look, I know that I prefer the route the film-makers chose. Whilst I appreciate some people have apparently been unnerved by the descent into the Uncanny Valley (and I do think Leila's appearance later on looked a lot dodgier) I know people who saw the film who didn't know the character was digitally altered. I therefore suspect much of the chagrin at his appearance stems from the fact that most people know Cushing is dead, rather than because the VFX are terrible (they are in fact brilliant - for Tarkin at least).

I love the Vader scene at the end, worth the price of admission on its own even if you think the rest of the flick sucks.

For me it works as a stand alone film set within the Star Wars universe, is an effective war movie and it provides excellent service to knowledgable Star Wars fans. What's not to like?!

3.5 stars.
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Zakalwe
Fri, Nov 4, 2016, 4:31pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S1: Conspiracy

My intention wasn't to insult the author, I was trying to be funny. My apologies to him if it came across that way.
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Zakalwe
Thu, Nov 3, 2016, 5:35pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S1: Conspiracy

What the actual F was that?! I'm watching the repeats on Sci-Fi in the UK in order, having not seen some of the episodes for 20 years and I didn't remember this one. So I'm reading these comments and thinking, "err how did I miss a cranial explosion?" until seeing the explanation that it was censored. So I checked it out on YouTube. Utterly frigging ridiculous!

The central problem I have with this episode is the same issue I have with all of season one. It's not that it's irredeemably terrible (though the racist one with the all black backward tribal "aliens" was truly risible) but that, with just a few small tweaks that really would not take much intelligence or common sense to make, it could have been so much better. Most of it has been mentioned above, but again, why have Quinn act like Hulk Hogan in a completely irrational way? Why have the aliens sit down to a meal of worms just in case the viewer didn't understand that "MWUHAHAHAHAHA THESE ARE THE BAD GUYS!!!!"? This kind of stuff completely wrecks the suspension of disbelief that is necessary to otherwise enjoy Sci-Fi - and which later TNG managed to avoid, generally.

By the by, it's also clear that Jammer has over-rated almost all of season one due to nostalgia. This episode gets the same rating, for example, as season 6's Tapestry. Now I'm sorry, but you'd have to have been lobotomised to watch this episode and that and conclude that they are similarly good. Jammer is clearly in possession of a whole brain and this is an observation rather than a criticism, but clearly a lot of complete dross in this season gets a bit of a free pass just because it's Trek, and we all love Trek, even when it's so bad it threatens to give you eye cancer to watch it.
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Zakalwe
Mon, Oct 24, 2016, 4:17pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S1: Haven

I'm surprised at the benign response to this episode, I thought it was hideous. Riker acts like a massively unprofessional bell-end; how did the guy presented at this point in the series get one unfortunate transporter accident away from commanding the flagship of the Federation? The chump flounced out of a meeting with the senior officers in with Picard literally in mid-sentence and cried off an important social function because of a chick? At least the bloke who he would become - a chubby hirsute comedian with an ongoing mission to impregnate new life forms - was portrayed as professional and competent enough at the actual job to be a believable commander. But this dude?! Come on!

Then there's Picard, a man so far presented as angry, humourless and certainly not one to suffer fools gladly but also confident and assertive. How did he suddenly turn into a genuflecting moron in front of Troi's mum? I'd like to think season one Picard actually in-character would sooner "accidentally" leave her in a holodeck simulation of a nuclear apocalypse with the safety protocols disengaged rather than do his best bellboy impression to carry her freaking massively impractical bronze-plated suitcase.

Perhaps I've just had a sense of humour failure?
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Zakalwe
Sat, Oct 8, 2016, 8:08am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S6: Tapestry

To address the objections raised above by a few people regarding the inference that being the unremarkable, middling crew member that Picard becomes in the alternate timeline is somehow without merit.

I don't believe the writers intended to imply that not being captain is a valueless existence at all. This is quite clear given how the show establishes that all the non-Captain main characters are each absolutely crucial to the success of the Enterprise's ongoing mission (with the possible exception of the oxygen thief of a "counselor")

However for the specific character of Picard, how else would you expect him to come to terms with being a lowly lieutenant? We are talking about a man who is quite likely the single most powerful human being in history, given that he is in command of the single most powerful piece of military hardware in human history, crewed by some of the finest officers in Starfleet, who have for years looked up to him and would willingly fling themselves into a star's corona at his command. By extension this also makes him one of the single most powerful beings in the Galaxy since he is the commander of the flagship of the Federation, one of the Galaxies' largest factions.

So ask yourself this, if you'd lived your entire life as a lion, as the King of the Jungle*, how would you react to being asked to live the rest of your days as a mouse?

*I know lions don't live in jungles!
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LW
Thu, Jul 28, 2016, 10:42am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek Beyond

Star Trek: Beyond main problem is not continuing on from the story that was set up during Star Trek: Into Darkness which gave the franchise so many storytelling opportunities from the conspiracy at the heart of the federation to an intergalactic war between the federation and the klingons
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LW
Thu, Jul 28, 2016, 10:35am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek Beyond

Star Trek Movie Ranking:

1) Star Trek: Into Darkness
2) Star Trek: The Undiscovered Country
3) Star Trek: First Contact
4: Star Trek: 2009
5) Star Trek: Wrath of Khan
6) Star Trek: The Voyage Home
7) Star Trek: Beyond
8) Star Trek: Insurrection
9) Star Trek: The Search For Spock
10) Star Trek: Generation
11) Star Trek: The Final Frontier
12) Star Trek: The Motion Picture
13) Star Trek: Nemesis

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Skylwaker
Tue, Jun 14, 2016, 7:05pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: Our Man Bashir

When they wake up in Dr. Noah's mansion, Nana Visitor says perfectly in Russian, "Что случилось...?" ("What happened...?") Impeccable pronunciation! That made me laugh because it shocked me. She also in the same scene says "anarchist" exactly as a Russian might. Go Kira! She's my favorite.

What made me really laugh was announcing that they are at 25,000 feet above mean sea level, and then they all proceeded to smoke! Smoking a cigar would increase their physiological altitude by 5,000 feet even if they were at sea level! They should all pass out again at once, haha. They would be way into the critical stage of hypoxia. I took this to be another joke.

I also liked the multiple pun-reference of "Dr. Hippocrates Noah" -- The Hippocratic oath of do no harm, the play on Dr. No, and finally the fact that the world would flood, like the biblical flood of Noah.

@Luke, are you also a fan of Archer? That's a personal favorite of mine.
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TLW
Fri, Feb 12, 2016, 8:44am (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S2: Cogenitor

I'm kind of on the fence about this one. Maybe it wasn't right for Trip to have interfered in the first place. But once the damage was done, what point was there for denying the cogeniter asylum? Unless the Vissians had threatened them in some way. (which didn't seem to be the case) Perhaps there should have been a throwaway line about Archer being ordered by top brass to it.

If the cogeniter was only needed for an enzyme, they could have asked the cogeniter* if they were willing to donate it to the couple and then granted them asylum. Perhaps Phlox could have come up with a procedure if the Vissians said it wouldn't work.

*It seems weird to have to say the cogeniter each time. But they are considered other than male or female, but saying "it" seems disrespectful.
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TLW
Thu, Feb 11, 2016, 11:43pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: Fury

Some thoughts.

Some have said maybe she was suffering from some kind of dementia. That does seem plausible, except for two things. If she ascended to a higher plane of existence, she wouldn't have a physical body with a physical brain to get dementia. Also if she did get her real body back, she wasn't old enough to get dementia. It was established in "Before and After", that didn't start until an Ocampa was nine years old. Kes would only have been about six. Unless there was something else going on to cause it.

Some other theories. She was from an alternate universe. Or she was the female caretaker pretending to be Kes, out to get Voyager again.

Something else. Why did she kill B'Elanna other than she was trying to stop her. The first (and maybe only time) I've watched this, my first impression was, maybe Kes thought about how saving Torres and Janeway in the alternate timeline of "Before and After", had cost her a family and a whole future and she was pissed. But that's just my opinion at the time.
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TLW
Thu, Feb 11, 2016, 6:21pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S1: The Neutral Zone

Dan, I agree with everything you said here.
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