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James
Sun, Jul 9, 2017, 6:38am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: Counterpoint

I was so angry about this episode that I would give it 1 star. Just in the previous episode, Tom Paris was harshly punished by violating PD. And in this episode, Janeway did exactly the same thing and it's OK because she had good friends in admirals? What the hell.
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James
Thu, May 25, 2017, 7:44pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: Ethics

Why does that doctor who comes on board have the exact same hairstyle and wardrobe as 21st century Hillary Clinton?
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James
Wed, May 24, 2017, 7:48pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S1: Eye of the Needle

Seriously???

Why didn't they just transport through the worm hole and then use one of the many methods of time travel to return to their home time?

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James
Sat, May 20, 2017, 10:54pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S4: Brothers

I don't see how the events of this episode didn't result in Data immediately being removed from his position on the bridge and sent back to a Starfleet research facility to ensure this never happens again.

If his brain is able to be hacked into, it's a huge security risk even having him on board.
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James
Fri, May 19, 2017, 8:23pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S6: Sacrifice of Angels

I don't think wormhole aliens are deus ex machina. They are also much less powerful than Q. In this episode, their "power" is actually quite easy to explain: they changed the wormhole to shift Jam-Hadar ships to another time. Assuming the wormhole is a bridge, the aliens just built a branch, that's it. Since they can build wormhole, they can certainly change it. It is just a small step for them.

Of course, this "small step" is a huge help for the alpha quadrant. The wormhole is sealed, and no more Dominion reinforcement can arrive.
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James
Sat, Apr 29, 2017, 10:52pm (UTC -5)
Re: Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

This was a dreadful film. Has Jammer lost the plot? A lot of poor reviews lately. Perhaps a 5 season run of reviewing Babylon 5 will help him rediscover what good sci-fi is.
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James
Sat, Mar 4, 2017, 9:59am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S4: Retrospect

I was going to write a detailed response to the review and the comments above, but John saved me the trouble. While I am not sure I would agree that the huge majority of rape allegations may be false, everything else in Johns post is absolutely spot on.

It's virtually an axiom of liberal feminist dogma that the female making any allegation of assault must always be believed automatically, and that the accused must therefore prove his innocence. This notion, along with all those comments above which clearly subscribe to it, are despicable. Truly despicable.

In case you are unable to grasp it, allow me to restate it clearly. Kovin has no need whatsoever to PROVE his innocence. He is ALREADY presumed innocent. IT'S HIS ACCUSERS WHO BEAR THE BURDEN OF PROVING HIS GUILT, WHICH THEY COMPLETELY FAILED TO DO, because there is not a shred of hard evidence. Therefore there is absolutely no ambiguity whatsoever at the end regarding his innocence. He is. CASE CLOSED. The fact that you are refusing to see this just shows your natural bias and prejudice in this matter

To all those professing shock and horror at the handling of a "rape" case on star trek where the plight of the female "victim" was handled insensitively, allow me to ask you a question. Where were your exclamations of horror and outrage when Chakotay was tortured and then raped by Seska and his dna used to (unsuccessfully, as it transpired) impregnate herself with his child against his wishes? Oh thats right, there wasn't any. There was a general "ho-hum, that nasty seska up to her old tricks again" response. Ironically, THAT was a true rape, unlike what happened to seven, yet there was barely a murmur of disquiet at the spectacle. But he is a man so who gives a shit really what happens to him, right? We even had a scene where chuckles dad basically told him to suck it up and just accept the kid already. Can you imagine the hurricane of outrage from the sisterhood if the roles had been reversed, and a female was raped, impregnated and told to stop moaning and just accept and raise the child?

Although many posters here would refuse to acknowledge it, there are two potential victims when it comes to rape. The genuine victims who are telling the truth, AND those men who are the victim of false rape accusations. And to Nic above who stated "Of course it happens in real life, but very rarely", how the hell could you possibly know that? You cannot just pull statments like that out of your butt and expect to be taken seriously.

A false rape allegation can completely DESTROY a mans life. As someone who witnessed just such an occurence, where a false rape charge led to the man committing suicide in despair only to see the accuser later recant her claim, I have nothing but sympathy for Kovins character here. Take the example of this episode. Even though the case against Kovin completely collapsed, we still have a bevy of posters muttering at how they are not convinced of his innocence, and that his strong emotional reaction to the accusations are, if anything, suggestive of his guilt! Can you imagine what its like for a man who similarly accused in real life? Everyone looks on you as guilty, evidence be damned. Your colleagues, neighbours, friends, acquaintances and even family all look at you with barely disguised suspicion at best, or open contempt at worst. Even when completely acquitted and exonerated, there are plenty of people who will still assume his guilt on the principle that there is no smoke without fire. Disgusting.

In defence of seven, I will say that I do not believe she is primarily to blame here, although she cannot evade responsibility for her role in making false allegations. However I have sympathy for her because she genuinely believes her repressed memory impressions are accurate and real. The true culprit to my mind is the doctor. He is the one primarily responsible for the ensuing witch hunt, however I can partially forgive him for it in the light of his remorse and contrition at the end. Neither of them are directly responsible for Kovins suicide, and I believe Janeway showed commendable courage and restraint when he was attacking voyager in his panic. However, there should be SOME consequences for the accusers, beyond simply feeling guilty and then being told its ok.

In summation, I have to confess I am genuinely amazed and impressed that a series like Star trek, which is largely informed by a liberal, feminist ideology would have the courage to tackle the issue of false rape allegations, especially where the accuser was female and accused was the male alien-of-the-week. Bravo.
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James
Sat, Mar 4, 2017, 2:30am (UTC -5)
Re: BSG S2: Fragged

Keep in mind that although BSG takes place in a world with similar values to our own, we can't necessarily say that everything is the same. Also, the legalities of a thing that happens are confusing enough in our world, where it takes a team of expensive lawyers to sort out whether that thing could be considered legal in some context. Throw in the added complication that military law would also apply here, and the "mutiny" scene becomes, in legal terms, a hot frakking mess.

However, if we were to judge the scene by our rules, I would say that Crashdown is both right and wrong, in many different ways. He's right in that he's the ranking officer, but wrong in that he doesn't take the senior NCO's advice to heart. He's right in his intent to clear the AA positions, but wrong in that he doesn't have any tactical advantage to do so. He's right in that Cally, petrified by terror, is technically disobeying a lawful order and is subject to a possible court martial and even death, but he is once again wrong in carrying out the judgment and execution himself (or even bluffing it). Had he killed her and ultimately survived the mission, he might be the one who ends up being convicted of murder, especially in light of the rest of his decisions up to this point.

I think a combination of pride, stress, and inexperience led to his ultimate demise. And although it's a little contrived, it's intriguing to me to think that the entire situation could be taken as a test of Baltar's faith and manhood.
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James
Wed, Mar 1, 2017, 10:07pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S7: Sub Rosa

Did anyone else notice that the last scene with Ronin has him appearing between the gravestones of Vader and McFly? I'm wondering what other easter eggs I missed but I'm not keen on watching this episode again to find them.

However, this episode leaves me with some unanswered questions:

-Can aliens perform religious burial ceremonies for humans?

-Is Scotland really so interesting to model an entire human colony after it? I find it hard to believe that only one type of human culture has been preserved in this little colony for so long. It's almost as bad as the episode with the Irish colonists.

-How is it that something as important as a "weather control" system has gone without proper maintenance for 22 years? Can this governor not just ask the Federation to have someone drop by once in a while? Are there no regular transports to the colony that could take care of these things? He has to wait for someone to die, then bribe the captain of the flagship with a tour of the colony and a "hot meal."

-If they teleported the coffin from inside the ground to the top of the dirt pile that was previously on top of the coffin, wouldn't the displacement cause it to sink a little?

-How the hell has that candle been lit every day for 800 years? That is some seriously dense wax. Unless the creature-cough-(ghost)-cough lives in the fire itself somehow. But if it needs an organic host, why is it living in a fire? I really didn't follow the technobabble on this one.

-Why is it so often impossible for characters to simply "turn off" a beam? Just unplug the damn thing!
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james alexander
Sun, Dec 11, 2016, 6:08pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S4: Year of Hell, Part I

I do get a kick out of any episode that goes as far as to trash the USS Voyager, such as this one or even Deadlock.
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james alexander
Sun, Dec 11, 2016, 6:07pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S4: Year of Hell, Part I

this is one of my favourites, when I'm looking for a good couple of hours of television.
we have a Voyager at war, people are dying, anything that can go wrong will, and the action scenes of Voyager getting battered are still really cool. the walking reset button aspect of it turns it into more of an experiment than a nightmare that's going to haunt the ship and crew, however.
how much damage can we do? how many crew members can we kill? how will Janeway behave when she's subjected to a Year of Hell?

the way I see it, something this devastating ought to have been used as the final story-arc before the ship somehow makes it home. there was potential for a several episode arc, but instead it was a two-part episode with a reset, that simply turns it into a hypothetical scenario.
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james alexander
Fri, Dec 9, 2016, 10:06am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek: Insurrection

well, somebody thought that it was a good idea for a flag-officer to beam down to a Cardassian Planet on a black-ops mission.
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james alexander
Fri, Dec 9, 2016, 9:40am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek: Insurrection

that's a good point Peter, people are living longer and Picard has been put through worse situations before, such as in Chain of Command, or even the episode where his artificial heart blew-out and it was revealed that Q is Saint Peter.

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james alexander
Fri, Dec 9, 2016, 2:44am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek: Insurrection

third thing that I need to bitch about:
Action Picard, and this is an issue with all the films. in this one we see a bald man in his sixties climbing all over a scaffold while holding a rifle, and he even stops to complain that he's too old at one point. Show Picard was a wise captain who would talk the back legs of a donkey then debate the moral justification for doing so, and now he's taking the Bruce Willis roles, in the films?

I can understand Riker doing action stuff, because it's Riker, and I can buy Worf beating people up, although he's starting to get fat in this one, but is Picard having a midlife crisis?
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james alexander
Fri, Dec 9, 2016, 2:28am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek: Insurrection

Trek fan, I kind of agree with you.

nemesis was unspeakably dull but at least it had that battle.

insurrection is just painful to watch, with the comedy layered over a badly written political story, that also thinks it's an action film. in the first twenty minutes we see Data lose his mind, causing Picard and Data to stunt-fly their shuttles and somehow lock them together, without smashing into the ground, while Data sings HMS Pinafore. screw the Prime Directive, we're going to outfly the red arrows, in space shuttles.
there was one good moment and that was also completely bonkers, when Riker pulls out a joystick and starts flying the Enterprise like it's a computer game.
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james alexander
Fri, Dec 9, 2016, 2:21am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek: Insurrection

I've taken to calling them space druids, with their apparent refusal to progress past the Iron Age Technologically.

the "Fountain of youth" should have been done away with, because the way it is executed leaves the space-druids without an argument:
the ugly buggers are coming back to a planet that supposedly grants long life-spans or something, and the space-druids won't piss off, despite the progress that they could make in another place. (McCoy lived to 140 according to the books, which isn't bad)
so the druids have the knowledge of advanced technology but they refuse to use it, instead they refuse to leave Narnia.
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james42519
Mon, Oct 24, 2016, 6:05am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: A Matter of Time

meant to say 23rd centary
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james42519
Mon, Oct 24, 2016, 5:33am (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: A Matter of Time

in the beginning he says went back in time 300 years from 26 centenary. so that would be 25 centenary then? don't know why didn't say something till the end where say welcome to 24th centenary.
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James
Sat, Oct 15, 2016, 9:43pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: Collective

FYI, AA, they don't keep juvenile drones in maturation chambers for years. They mature extremely quickly, as did 'One' back in season 5. It makes sense, if they have the tech to do it, because it wouldn't take much longer (if at all longer) than the standard assimilation process.
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James
Tue, Oct 11, 2016, 6:18pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: Live Fast and Prosper


Am I the only one who gets endlessly frustrated with how ship combat always unfolds in Star Trek? Every time they try to do anything, the ship gets hit, and the exact thing they were trying to do goes offline. Sometimes several times in a row. Trying to use the tractor beam? Blam, tractor beam offline. Trying to transport someone? Blam, transporters offline. Replace with weapons, communications, warp drive, ad nauseum, and that's Star Trek in a nutshell.
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James
Sun, Oct 9, 2016, 9:47pm (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S6: Equinox, Part II

Damn, these two parts were bad. The worst sort of bad - not only poor, lazy writing, but actually destructive to the show. This two parter actually manages to fundamentally damage two characters: that's quite the achievement for 1 1/2 hours of storytelling.

1. The doctor. So, the doctor is simply a function of his ethical subroutines. First, why does he have 'ethical subroutines' that are easily divisible from his character? If one were to delete my 'ethical subroutines' then I'd cease to function. My personality and behaviour would not make sense. It would be like deleting the CNS from a living being: you can't just remove something so fundamental. Aside from that (rather obvious) point: if we forget the impossibility of that for a moment, and assume ethical subroutines can be isolated and removed, then why is the result what it is? Why is the doctor suddenly risking his own neck - his own program - by helping people he's never met? This seems to me a combination of two related but distinct confusions on the part of the writers:

a. The plot driver - that the doctor would help the Equinox crew because he's evil.

b. That removing ethics = actively evil, as opposed to devoid of ethics. They are, of course, entirely different states of being.

Somehow, the doctor has none of his old friendships, his loyalty to the Voyager crewl heck, even his self-preservation is gone, as he helps the obvious underdogs, even though his program would be able to trivially calculate the (slim) chances of their success against Voyager. Even leaving aside the unexplained absence of his other non-ethical character traits (like friendships, or even love for Seven), his actions are unjustifiable on purely self-interested terms. None of this would be so bad if many of the same traits - loyalty, friendships, etc - weren't thrown in our face by being demonstrated in the other EMH. The doctor's character in this episode makes absolutely 0 sense. The result is a confusing mess that can only lead us to believe that the doctor is fundamentally bad - he has no real friendships, loyalty for the crew, or love for Seven, etc. The only thing keeping him obeying Janeway is his ethical subroutines. The only other option is to believe that the doctor's program is trivial to alter: it's so simple that Ransom could isolate all of his ethical subroutines, as well as all of his loyalties and friendships, and just remove them, while rebuilding his program into a coherent personality, with a simple few buttons. The latter is implausible and has been contradicted in the past, but it's obviously the more attractive proposition.

Now, onto the second character, who is, if anything, even more grievously assaulted by the writers.

2. Captain Janeway. There are several grounds for complaint. The first is, obviously, consistency. This is the Janeway of Year of Hell, who was apparently a stalwart defender of the Prime Directive, and a tested veteran in the Delta Quandrant. She wasn't new to any of this. Why is it that on the feeblest of pretexts - she doesn't like the cut of Ransom's jib - she throws it all away and suddenly becomes evil? She's far and away worse than Ransom. He was out there for years in an inferior vessel, against the worst of the Delta Quadrant. He had a choice, but the years of pressure got to him, and - of course - he was only the Captain of a short-range science vessel. She was captain of one of the most up-to-date long-range military ships in the fleet, expected to deal with the complex morality of hunting down ex-starfleet officers. Starfleet command would only have chosen the most morally sure and psychologically stalwart officers for the job. But - even with her sonic showers and replicators intact - all it takes is a couple of hours and a flimsy desire for 'revenge' for Janeway to lose the plot?

We also have to complain about plausibility. In short, Janeway ought to have been relieved of command in the course of the episode, and the mission should have been continued with Chakotay at the helm. I could understand, at least to some degree, if the episode were cast as a permanent and serious mental breakdown for Janeway. The idea of a captain like Janeway getting away with throwing other imprisoned starfleet officers to the wolves (nigh-literally),capturing an innocent vessel and forcing them to help her, or offering up an entire ship for sacrifice, is beyond farcical. Were it to actually occur, the captain would surely be, as I said, permanently relieved of command, delta quadrant or no. This is especially the case in a crew partly comprised of Maquis - individuals who threw away their ordinary lives, many ex-starfleet, to risk their lives for a *moral* cause.

Finally, likeability and confidence. The Janeway of Equinox is not a character I have any interest in supporting, identifying with, or appreciating. Knowing that a trivially-triggered, obsessive, psychopathic personality lies dormant makes the character ultimately repulsive. How do the writers expect the serious among us to go back to following her next week? Sure, you might say 'it's only a TV show'. I agree. But that doesn't let the writers off. We need to sympathise with our main characters, and here we're left with a choice of pretending it didn't happen or dealing with the fact that the captain is now a mentally unstable murderous moral hypocrite. (I chose the former, of course...)

The damage done to her character actually reverberates among the crew: where's Chakotay or Tuvok or even Harry Kim during all of this? They ought to have put a line in the sand at some point. But all we get are a few worried looks. Sure, Chakotay is relieved, but there's no way he should have let it get that far, and there's no way he should have stood by after being relieved instead of intervening. This ultimately only harms our opinions of the other crew members. Clearly, unlike Picard's or Kirk's crews, the crew of Voyager will not step back from doing the most heinous and immoral things when commanded to by their captain. This causes similar grounds for complaint to those about Janeway, particularly in consistency.

Anyway, enough. I could write for days about the issues with this two-parter. For me, it represents everything that was bad about Voyager. 0 stars from me: episodes like this are worse than episodes like Threshold, for me, because the latter only hurt the technobabble, but the former undermine the characters, who are the foundations of the show. And they do it on the flimsiest of pretexts, and all for the sake of giving us a couple of action-packed hours.
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James
Tue, Oct 4, 2016, 7:32am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S7: Endgame

To be honest, voyager has always been my favourite Star Trek series while Enterprise, DS9 and TOS are the worst, imo of course but the final episode of Voyager left me feeling cheated.

There was just no pay off at all. I think everyone knew they would get home by the end of the episode but the abrupt ending was ridiculous.
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James
Wed, Aug 17, 2016, 1:43pm (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek: Discovery

Like many others here, I will be deeply disappointed if this is not 100% family friendly.I can accept Troi's low cut uniform, and even so tastefully dressed "green aliens" but strong language and sexual situations would be a poor direction for this show. That said I may never get to see it since I will not subscribe to another streaming service,especially for just one show.
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james alexander
Sun, Jul 24, 2016, 8:12am (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek Into Darkness

being a bit fussy, but is it possible for a performance to be "too strong"?

I remember seeing it and getting the impression that Benedict was completely overwhelming the rest of the cast. it isn't something that I can easily explain though.
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James
Thu, Jul 21, 2016, 2:49pm (UTC -5)
Re: Star Trek Into Darkness

Well, so much for Jammer having the review of STiD up before STB came out.
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