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Filip
Fri, Feb 17, 2017, 6:02pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: To the Death

@Chrome

"Apocalypse Rising" is another example of how little sense that whole policy makes. Worf and Odo going on that mission actually does make some sense, but for sure there are at least a couple of experts on Klingon culture in Starfleet that could've taken Sisko's and O'Brien's place there, avoiding the whole blitz-lesson on Klingon culture on Dukat's ship (although that did give us a hilarious scene).

But what makes the "Apocalypse Rising" different from the "To the Death" is that it was gripping from start to finish to the extent that it didn't challenge my suspension of disbelief the way "To the Death" did.

@Jammer

Yeah, I know. And I even wanted to mention that as a counter-argument to myself in one of the previous replies, but I decided to stick to it as if we were observing the story from "within the universe." All Star Trek series are filled with such inconsistencies, but more often than not their story and execution more than make up for it and keep me engaged, which is not the case with the episode in question.

Also, I hope no one got the impression that I'm this critical because I dislike DS9. Quite the opposite actually - for me as a series DS9 is a very close second to TNG and is one of the best things the television has ever produced and is something that I've constantly been coming back to over the years. It's just that as I get older some things are a bit harder to swallow.
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Filip
Thu, Feb 16, 2017, 4:11pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: To the Death

Once they set off from the station they were perfectly aware of what they were getting themselves into. Or do you think they planned on kindly asking the Jem'Hadar to return and fix the broken pylon?

The Dominion threat was obviously taken very seriously from the beginning since Starfleet decided to build an actual warship back in S3 when they went through with constructing a Defiant class starship after it had previously been scrapped, and the station became a much more important strategic point for Starfleet once the ship was assigned to it.

To better summarise what I've been trying to say, any mission that requires an implementation of a warship is very likely to need a MACO-like team on it. That simple.

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Filip
Thu, Feb 16, 2017, 2:30pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: To the Death

Chrome, you are missing my point. At the moment of the episode, he is the chief engineering officer not only of the Defiant, but of DS9 as well, and is as such a too valuable asset to risk in an operation that could've been handled by a specially trained team. The battle drills were to prepare them for a "if push comes to shove" situation, which is not the case with this episode - from the start they set on a mission with a specific goal with a high probability of battle. This wasn't an unplanned event, nor was it a TNG era Enterprise cruising along when it suddenly got caught in a hostile enviorment where they had to risk the vital parts of the ship's crew. In that situation, I might've agreed with you, but this is the complete opposite.

My other examples still stand.
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FIlip
Mon, Feb 13, 2017, 6:34am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: To the Death

As for Dax, she may have fighting experience which is, again, personal, and not due to her extensive combat training. After all, she is a science officer. Even if she is proficient in hand to hand combat, can you make the same assumption for every science officer of every Federation starship? Chances are, the vast majority probably never held a blade in their hands as I don't think swordfighting would be a course at the Academy, let alone slash someone with it.
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Filip
Mon, Feb 13, 2017, 6:30am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: To the Death

@Chrome

Sorry for the late response but I never thought that someone actually read these comments.

Anyway, they shouldn't have been fighting the Klingons in the first place for the same reasons. Also, personal experience shouldn't be a deciding factor in who to send on such a mission. To give you a real life example, I could be a maintenance engineer on an aircraft carrier and be a season Krav Maga pratictioner, but that would still make me unfit to go parachuting behind enemy lines.

It was also mentioned on more than one ocassion that O'Brien and his staff didn't even go to the Academy, as their function onboard was that of an engineer. Which brings me back to my first point, if they had a special operations team for such missions, the engineers' job would be just to - engineer.
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Filip
Thu, Feb 2, 2017, 3:31pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S5: The Begotten

Superb Odo plot and character development. One thing that bothers me is the continuous hipocrisy of the Founders. They sent out a hundred defensless baby changelings to evaluate how the solids would treat them. In Odo's case, he was found helpless by the solids and allowed to fully develop and take his place in society. And yet, the Founders are hell bent on destroying the solids anyway. Seems like nothing can change their minds, so why send defensless members of your own species you apparently care so much about into unknown space?
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Filip
Wed, Feb 1, 2017, 7:26pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: To the Death

The parts of the episode leading to the battle were done very well and I enjoyed them very much. The battle itself falls flat, but since others have already discussed it I am not going to.

What I want to point is the absurdity that a warship, which Defiant most certainly is, doesn't have a special task force onboard at all times that would be specifically trained for armed engagements. Actually, apart from Enterprise's MACOs, a special military unit is never seen or even mentioned anywhere on the show. Yes, it is "anti-Trekkian," but they are at war, and since the Defiant is clearly labeled as a warship I don't see a problem with that given the circumstances.

I personally find it ridiculous that O'Brien, who is an engineeer by training, or Dax, or Sisko for that matter, would participate in a sword fight no less.
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Filip
Wed, Feb 1, 2017, 9:49am (UTC -5)
Re: VOY S5: Timeless

For me, a very uneven episode. At first I was excited to see a TNG character appear on the show, but ultimately it all falls flat. As others have pointed out, there are too many plot holes and inconsitencies to make this a great episode. Also, I like someone's comment that said that Voyager basically ended in this episode.

One major thing that sticks out for me is the dialogue between Kim and the Doctor where Kim tells him that he can either join them or have his program taken offline. Imagine if that conversation happened between two people, that is, if the Doctor wasn't a hologram - it would be something like this: join us or die. And the way it's casually performed is even more appaling. If Kim had really wanted to give the Doctor an honest alternative, he should've said join us or we can beam you aboard the Challenger.
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Filip
Tue, Jan 31, 2017, 5:00pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S5: Business as Usual

Funny that the props used for rifle models in the holodeck look a lot better than the ones used by the Federation and others great powers.
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Filip
Sun, Jan 29, 2017, 11:36am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: The House of Quark

I never understood how the head of the Klingon Empire had the time to deal with every family feud there was on their homeplanet. Let's assume that the planet's population was around 5 billion, how would Gowron be able to mediate in every single quarel its people had?

I do have to say that Gowron's reaction towards Quark was absolutely hilarious.
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Filip
Fri, Jan 27, 2017, 7:29pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S5: Apocalypse Rising

Solid episode, I just wanted to say what a great and nuanced character Dukat was. Too bad they completely ruined him and turned him in a complete, almost cartoon-like, villain in the final season.
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Filip
Wed, Nov 26, 2014, 5:13pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S5: Looking for Par'mach in All the Wrong Places

An entertaining episode, plus, the final scene with the doctor in the infirmary is priceless!
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Filip
Fri, Nov 21, 2014, 9:23am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: Hard Time

An interesting concept, however, flawed from the start because of the choice of its protagonist - a series regular.

That being said, it was obvious from the start that O'Brien would fully recover from the experience. I am not saying that the episode was bad, or that Mr. Meaney did a bad job - quite the opposite actually. But it is hard to believe that a person who had the same experience would ever be remotely the same again, the more probable scenario would be that he'd go mad and not be fit for duty or any life in a civilised society at all.

Had it had a guest star as its protagonist, someone who wasn't essential for the series, and made him never recover, it would've made much more sense. But then, who would watch an entire episode about someone who we see for the first and only time?
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Filip
Wed, Nov 19, 2014, 7:06pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S4: Paradise Lost

In my opinion, a brilliant two-parter. Everything led up to the scenes between Sisko and Leyton, and the Defiant and the Lakota, which I could watch over and over again.

I just have to add, because of some previous comments, that I am one of those people who enjoy Mr. Brooks' acting.

Both parts - 5/5.
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Filip
Sat, Nov 15, 2014, 10:20am (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: The Die Is Cast

Everything that needs to be said has already been said in your review and the comments. One of the finest Trek hours, 5/5 without a doubt in my opinion.
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Filip
Wed, Nov 12, 2014, 6:50pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: Past Tense, Part I

Somehow, I find it hard to believe that the death of one man and an event in American history played out a bit differently would impact humanity in such a way that there would be no space program in the next 350 years.

Maybe there would be no Starfleet (although even that is a stretch), but if in one possible reality humanity created a warp 9 capable ships, then surely in a reality that differs only in one man's death humanity would at least develop something that could be registered by Defiant's sensors.

Although, I have to admit that the scene where O'Brien registered only Romulan signals so close to Earth was both interesting and somewhat sad.

Looking at the episode now, 20 years after it aired, and 10 years before its plot, gives us a really different perspective - in a sense that the episode seems much more real than it probably did 20 years ago. Plus, being a European, the comment that Europe was falling apart just made me sad, as well as Dr. Bashir's comment that "21st century was too depressing," because in fact, it really is turning out to be just like that.
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Filip
Sat, Nov 8, 2014, 4:15pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S3: The House of Quark

I was thinking the exact same thing Jack said the moment Quark woke up on Qo'noS.

I also wonder, does every dispute that Klingons have end up in front of the council? Sure it would make sense if the council was governing a village, but not an interstellar empire with billions of people.

Those two things do bother me a bit, but other than that an enjoyable episode.
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Filip
Tue, Nov 4, 2014, 5:12pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S2: Blood Oath

I realize that Star Trek is in part supposed to be a family show, but the lack of blood in battle scenes always bothered me since it takes away from the realism. I also found the part where Jadzia says "she's lost and looking for a tennis field" unnecessary because it is trying to funny in a scene which is supposed to do the exact oposite.

Apart from that, a good episode which I enjoyed watching. The final scene was superb.
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Filip
Tue, Nov 4, 2014, 3:36pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S2: Profit and Loss

I forgot one more thing - if Garak supported the professor's cause, why did he inform the Central Command that they were on the station in the first place?
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Filip
Tue, Nov 4, 2014, 3:32pm (UTC -5)
Re: DS9 S2: Profit and Loss

In my opinion, the episode started strong. It really caught my interest, especially the scene where Garak uses a fashion allegory to explain the situation to Quark.

However, after Natima shot Quark, everything fell apart. The change in the story was so strong at that point that I thought Quark started hallucinating due to the phaser blast.

What authority does Odo have to release Bajoran prisoners? If he did it for justice, why wait until Quark came to beg him to release them? What about those Bajorans held by the Cardassians? Are they going back to imprisonment? And wasn't it mentioned in an earlier episode that there is a treaty between Bajorans and Cardassians which prevents Cardassians from having any Bajoran prisoners? Who would anwser for that gul's death?

The end was so rushed, it leaves the impression that the writers didn't even care about the consistency of the episode, or logic for that matter.

Those plotholes wouldn't bother me as much if it had been a poor episode from the start. Like this, the episode just feels utterly wasted. Garak and Quark were its only saving grace. Pitty.
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Filip
Wed, Apr 2, 2014, 4:12pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S2: Loud as a Whisper

A really interesting episode. It really intrigued me with the way Riva communicated with everyone else and that part of the story was, in my opinion, executed very good. The entire concept of his chorus was both well thought out and performed, and I was interested to see what was going to happen.

However, the episode is obviously not without its problems, some of which damaged the episode as a whole. First was the part already mentioned by Jammer and some other people in the comments - how didn't anyone know about Riva's condition before they met him? The comment about that being on 24th century Wikipedia made me laugh. But OK, that wasn't really such a big problem. However, the scenes on the planet were. Everything up to the point where they beam down to the planet was done really good, and after that, things just started to make no sense. Why did Riva beam down to a rock in the middle of nowhere? It gave the impression that the planet was about 500 square meters big and that the rock where the planet scenes took place was pretty much all there is to it. Then, the scene where his chorus gets killed. Oh my... To say that it was poorly acted would be an understatement. Furthermore, it was more like I was watching a theatre play which relied on the viewer's imagination to colour up the scene instead of watching a TELEVISION show. I didn't get that sense of alarm when Riker jumped to save Riva, everything about that scene was just bland, slow, and empty. I realise that they had a 42 minute time constraint for the whole episode (and that it was 1988 after all) but come on... It could've been done way better.
And the final scene when they leave him on the planet also made little sense. Someone already said that it wasn't smart to leave him there without any means of contacting the Federation. I'll add this: what was he going to eat? Where would he sleep? Where would he go to the bathroom and wash himself? Again, it leaves the impression like they were on some rock traveling through space, Riva and three of those guys, sitting at that table for months learning sign language. Literally doing only that and nothing else for months. Come on...

If you ask me, if the planet scenes had been done better, this would've been a truly great episode. It is still good, I guess the whole aspect of his chorus really sparked my interest.
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Filip
Fri, Feb 28, 2014, 5:20pm (UTC -5)
Re: TNG S5: I, Borg

There is a mistake in the episode, where Hugh refers to himself as I before grasping the concept of indivituality. Just before getting his name, he ask the doctor and Geordi "Do I have a name?", and then after that keeps refering to himself as 'we'.

Overall a great episode though.
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Filip
Tue, Jan 28, 2014, 6:49am (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S4: Bound

Not a five star episode for sure, but I enjoyed it. Not ALL episodes have to make me think about deep topics. I also liked the development of the situation between Trip and T'Pol. Apart from that, an average no brainer episode.
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Filip
Wed, Jan 15, 2014, 1:10pm (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S2: A Night in Sickbay

@Paul, what I'm trying to say is that it would've been a pretty decent episode if it hadn't been for the awful writing for the Archer character. Which seems to be case for the entire series, I am not talking about Archer now but in general. Enterprise had a lot of potential, however most of its writing was lacking that final polish that had made the rest of Star Trek so special. Night In Sickbay being a great example of that. Unfortunately, the episode didn't only lack the final polish but also the quality writing of ceratin parts (Archer). Too bad that those parts, as you've said, make up the 90% of the episode.
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Filip
Tue, Jan 14, 2014, 9:09pm (UTC -5)
Re: ENT S2: A Night in Sickbay

This episode actually wasn't that bad. One more more or less quiet episode with its moments. The thing that ruined it for me was Archer. He was acting (and unfortuantely this is not only specific to this particular episode, although here it really, really showed) like a cowboy rocketed out into space. Okay, he was under stress, however, he is a starship captain which can't afford himself a luxury of going around taking it out on everybody. There isn't a universe in which I could imagine captain Picard do that, or even Sisko who was a bit... less held back. I get that it was supposed to lead to all the apologies at the end, but I think that it was over the top and mainly came across as just annoying. I was really satisfied when Phlox told Archer that he should be the one to think of a better way to treat Porthos when Archer exploded over the devised treatment. Oh, and isn't anyone bringin into question that no one bat an eye that they sacrificed one healthy animal in order to save antoher? I'm pretty sure that the cameleon didn't survive without its gland.

Other than that, I liked it. It would've been pretty good if it hadn't been for Archer's teenage behavior. The scenes and the writing related to T'Pol were fairly amusing and interesting to a ceratain degree.
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