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Neliz
Mon, Jan 15, 2018, 9:56am (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: The Wolf Inside

I really enjoyed this episode. Not normally commmentint but I feel some positivity is needed on this board.

I’m in with DISCO and really enjoying the show. This episode lived up to expectations, as it does a good job at juggling storylines from before the break and storylines from since the MU.
Whatever earlier expectations seemed to come true (Georgiou being the empress), I myself did not see it coming when Voq was revealed as the rebellion leader.
I particularly enjoyed Michael in her speech to Lorca expressing Starfleet thought. She convinced me there in her ideals, despite her execution sometimes. I like how the show shows this ambivalence in ideal and practice.

Looking forward to next week.

On the Jammer scale I rate this episode 3.5 stars
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Eli
Sat, Nov 4, 2017, 3:14am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: Assignment: Earth

Anyone have an idea why the lady was disguised as a cat?
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Eli
Sat, Nov 4, 2017, 3:07am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S6: Spirit Folk

I loved this episode! The bartender is a great character and his chemistry with Janeway is delightful. I loved the slow reveal of the spaceship to the Irish characters. It was a clash of cultures, of time periods and of individual personalities; yet, in the end, they found a way to peacefully coexist. Very charming!
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Eli
Sat, Nov 4, 2017, 2:52am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S2: Innocence

I'm with the supporters of this episode. This is a well written story that successfully develops Tuvok's character and presents a conflict with two legitimate sides. I would like to see more Star Trek episodes in which both the humans and the aliens have understandable and complex points of view. I can think of too many episode where the aliens are presented as villains and not given sufficient complexity. Also, I like Tuvok as a character a great deal. Perhaps, he should have been the focus of more stories. It's nice to see him the focus here.
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Where is Neelix?
Mon, Oct 30, 2017, 6:08pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: Magic to Make the Sanest Man Go Mad

Did the Klingon Orcs go back to Middle Earth yet?

Or did Captain Picard convince his friend Magneto to use his Gandalf power against them?

Hmmm
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Welihall
Sat, Oct 14, 2017, 9:33pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: The Butcher's Knife Cares Not for the Lamb's Cry

@OmicronThetaDeltaPhi,

Thanks for telling me how flawed my knowledge of Star Trek is, and for telling us what other people's motives "really" are when they complain about ratings systems.
With respect, and I doubt you intend to act this way, your comments (explaining why Jammer gave STID three stars, as if someone could not figure it out for himself or herself) sounds pompous and ministerial.

One of the reasons I do not post much on this site is because certain posters rather zestily are eager to show how superior their knowledge is to that of others'. It is intimidating, the idea of posting a thought only to be struck down by someone who claims to know better. I like discussions on this site where, if factual errors are ,as by someone, the error serves as a basis for a richer discussion, as opposed to an opportunity to try to destroy someone's credibility.

I have no idea how much you do or do not know about Trek

An earlier point I made was that humanity becoming enlightened in Star Trek has always been something more talked about than developed dramatically over time. I think I should be more clear (my apologies) in what I mean by "enlightened."

In the 2300s, Picard tells Lily that humans do not succumb to revenge, as by that time we have an "evolved sensibility." (Lily actually called bullshit, but that is tangential).
Not succumbing to revenge, not engaging in petty arguments, not responding with diplomacy or thinking over fists first-these I think we can agree are things reviewers and commenters talk about when they talk abou "enlightenment."

Your most recent response to what I wrote suggested that Enterprise was led by an at least semi-enlightened Jonathan Archer. To be sure, the characters act more civilized on ENT than on DIS. However, and this is the point I have been trying to make all along, that doesn't mean they acted as superior, enlightened beings. They kidnapped people (Stratagem). They ruthlessly deserted peopl in need to get to Atari Prime. Although I guess you are the ultimate arbiter of whether this is true, I actually watched the Xindi arc carefully. It was riveting TV. What I noticed though once the Xindi were defeated, Terran xenophobia reared its head immediately (see "Home," where Phlox was too afraid to go out with his shipmates). The question is, by the time of Enterprise, did prejudiced attitudes that had been cast aside by the Tim eof 200 years later, still exist?

Yes. I think a more probing question is: were they the exception and not the rule? I would like to think that even today, most folks are good at heart and it takes an ugly turn of events (such as 9/11) to bring out the most unenlightened aspects of ourselves. By Archer's time, we still reacted to traumatic events by attacking people different from us (my point, which I guess is a tangent now, about the Vulcans and Andoriams, is that although bigotry may present itself in subtler forms at later times, such behavior is universal - even, as the Trek writers tell is - across different species).

What we have been chewing over is whether Discovery shows humanity as not being as civilized as other pieces of Trek canon over the years have told us, ipse dixit, it is, or should be, and all I am saying is, it is unfair to attack the show on this basis of characters acting badder than they are "supposed" to when they have done so in EVERY Trek incarnation. "I was used to hating Klingons" Kirk said in Trek Vi )a human sentiment. How exactly was this sentiment eradicated by the time of TNG?)

There is a differnce between what Leonard Maizlish, whispering into Roddenberry's ear, says and what we are shown on the screen. The Trek powers that be can talk all they want about how conflict is gone by the 23rd century, but if we see it on the screen (as we did again and again in TOS, in movies 1-6), we see it. It is there; it is part of the canon. The writers' telling us that what we see is not the actual reality is the equivalent of interpreting a law by looking to what legislators "meant" (as evidenced in the legislative history record) as opposed to what the law actI ally says on its face (which is what a judge must look at first and foremost).

Also, and I do no write this to excuse lazy screenwriting, but not EVERY character we see on TNG is "unenlightened." Stamets, the Doctor, and Michael's roommate don't seem to act savagely. It is up for debate as to whether the events and behaviors we are witnessing on DIS are typical of humans at the time, or are atypical, either because the Lorcas of the world have exploited the opportunity of a war to push their agenda; or because the universe is a mirror universe, or for other pieces of stOrytelling yet to be told.

Finally as Jammer cautioned in his review of STID, Who Watches the Watchers, and others, trying to draw, from the actions of a mere handful of characters, what an entire society thinks, feels, or stands for, is a pointless exercise. We may be dealing with, on the Discovery, a ship that was made a warship by virtue of self-selection on the part of a few. This tells us little about what The billions of other people on Earth are like at the time-savage, perfect or otherwise, and I hope the show does give us more information going forward that allows us to get a clearer picture of where humanity at large (not humanity as represented solely by Lorca and Landry) is at

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Welihall
Sat, Oct 14, 2017, 5:38pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: The Butcher's Knife Cares Not for the Lamb's Cry

Worth reading:

www.jammersreviews.com/info/ratings.php
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WeliHall
Sat, Oct 14, 2017, 5:36pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: The Butcher's Knife Cares Not for the Lamb's Cry

I have been reading the latest round of comments , to find that Jammer is being attacked for not having sufficiently "explained" what his rating system is based on. I don't understand what the people who have a problem with the system are animated by. Maybe they do not like the scores given, but that fact is not grounds to attack the system as arbitrary

Please keep reviewing, Jammer, without taking to heart these calls to define what but definition can't be defined
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Eli
Tue, Oct 3, 2017, 3:04am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S7: Natural Law

By the way, though in essence the story is simple, I liked the complexity in the moral ambiguity of the central conflict as well. This is a well rounded, well developed episode.
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Eli
Tue, Oct 3, 2017, 2:47am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S7: Natural Law

A simple, beautiful episode. The story is straightforward, clear, succinct and plainly poetic. It's also filled with the best Star Trek ideals. Well done.
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Elise Kehle
Mon, Sep 25, 2017, 1:59pm (UTC -6)
Re: DSC S1: The Vulcan Hello / Battle at the Binary Stars

First of all, I REALLY like what I've seen of the aesthetic- a pretty good blending of TOS inspired chic with modern sensibilities. It'll be interesting to see if it develops as much as TNG-DS9 era evolved. The effects are a bit too Abramsesque for my taste, but they are well handled. Lots of new ship designs, few of which have any obvious parallel in the TOS era, which is troubling, but there are two elements that give me hope here. 1. T'Kuvma's flagship looks to be an early basis for the D-7 battlecruiser. 2. the USS Europa seems to be a Miranda class, which is a) awesome and b) finally shows what they looked like pre refit. A bonus point for the Zhenzhou looking like some cool designs from the Ship of the Line calendars, showing that this Trek has at least a modicum of respect for what came before, unlike Abrams nutrek.
Nice question to ask- what happens if the story of Kahless is not used to justify the status quo but to change it? Really makes the Klingons seem more dynamic. T'Kuvama and Voq have an interesting relationship, and I'm quite interested in seeing what happens next with them. I do hope they go back to smaller teeth prosthetics though, it's a shame to see such key characters speaking through muzzles with no great necessity for it.
As for the look of the Klingons, let's just say that the folks at CBS have done what some Star Wars nerds like me have longed for- visualize the Yuuzhan Vong. Unfortunately, this has no place in Star Trek, but I'll just headcanon it as a side effect of the Augment virus. I'm similarly disappointed by the look of the other Klingon ships, showing as they do no continuity I can see with either Enterprise or TOS era Klingon cruisers. (The absence of true Birds of Prey IS in keeping with established canon, although those smaller ships looked similar in wing, if not in primary hull).
Right away, it seems that they're trying to do DS9 again from the getgo, and I mean that in the best way possible. Streaming is also the way to implement this. Devoting the first two episodes to prologue, leaving the majority of billed main characters unseen is a gamble that no Trek series has been able to attempt before, and I think it really pays off in getting us to root for Michael Burnham, and to reintroduce us to Starfleet. This is not going to be another series where the protagonist is always right. It looks, however, to be a series where we can always get inside the protagonist's head, and this works to make ex-Cmdr Burnham the best developed female character the franchise has ever seen. She's more believable than Janeway, more sympathetic than Seven, and more dynamic in two episodes than Tasha, Crusher, Troi, Uhura, and Kes were in a combined 17 seasons. The only female characters to go through comparable development were Torres, Kira and Dax, and Torres and Dax both went through their changes as accessories to male-driven storylines. Michael Burnham (why the masculine name? Could Burnham be trans?) is already tied with Kira Nerys as a developed, believable woman with her own background, ideas, and personality. Her backstory of being a traumatized human orphan raised in a repressed Vulcan society, then latching onto her human coworkers and being loyal to them to a fault is a perfect setup, and it's honestly the sort of thing they said they were going to do with Tasha then forgot about. Burnham is Tasha done right, Kira done deeper, and there is a key ingredient- she's gotten to where she is, going a long way in what little we've seen of two episodes, largely through the mentoring, sisterly, almost maternal friendship of Captain Phillippa. Their relationship is a brilliant opening to the story.
The fact that Burnham was raised by Sarek is... interesting. Why would Sarek, who has been shown to be so outwardly disdainful of humans, not only volunteer to raise one, but show more tenderness with her than he ever did his own sons? (Not that that's saying much).
This brings us to the best part of the pilot episodes. Burnham's eagerness to explore the asteroid field, and Phillippa's indulgence of her curiosity. The effects here are stellar, and the best way to use modern technology to expand the Star Trek franchise. Seeing Burnham jetpack around the (then unknown) alien satellite, and her commentary (coupled with an earlier scene's establishing her as a anthropologist) go a long way to reminding us that Star Trek has always tried to be about humans' great capacity for, well, discovery. And as Burnham says, it is sublime.
Question of the week- will T'Kuvma's death ritual of placing Klingon corpses in coffins and using them as hull plating be rejected, leading to the Klingons' treating corpses as "empty shells" in the TNG era?
Overall I have to give these episodes a 3 out of 4 but that's heavily weighted. Great introduction to Burnham and Starfleet, not so great episodes overall, but they do what they need to do.
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Eli
Thu, Sep 14, 2017, 2:20am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S2: Resolutions

oops backrub is one word not two
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Eli
Thu, Sep 14, 2017, 2:17am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S2: Resolutions

Charming story! Good character development. Well done. I loved the back rub and Chakotay's story. I liked the monkey too. It was all rendered in a subtle way.

As others have mentioned, the setup was hard to believe: not only are the captain and first officer put in harms way, no one else has been affected by this issue. A better setup would have been less distracting.

Still, overall a very fine episode.
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Eli
Mon, Sep 11, 2017, 11:27pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S5: Once Upon a Time

By the way, when I say Neelix's conflict is understandable I mean: believable and well constructed.
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Eli
Mon, Sep 11, 2017, 11:21pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S5: Once Upon a Time

"Once Upon a Time," is an honest, straightforward, emotionally affecting episode. Well done. Neelix's conflict is understandable, Scarlett Pomers portrays Naomi Wildman very well, and Tuvok has some great lines. This story shows that sometimes simpler is better.
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Eli
Sun, Sep 10, 2017, 8:15am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S5: Night

I thought Voyager's "Night" was original and contained a good message. The stand alone plot was resolved in a satisfactory way, while the writers also revisited and clarified past themes. The Voyager crew stood up for good ideals and helped those in need. There may have been some elements of that could have benefited from further development (how did the aliens who live in the dark evolve that way?), but it was a legitimately interesting and effective episode.
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Eli
Thu, Sep 7, 2017, 5:50pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S4: Unforgettable

One last thing: I know some would say she did indeed decide her own fate. But, I think she actually prevented herself from making that decision by not allowing herself to spend time with Chakotay and recover her feelings for him. She essentially went along with the social customs of her people without question.
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Eli
Thu, Sep 7, 2017, 5:46pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S4: Unforgettable

I am partial to love stories, so it was no surprise to me that I enjoyed this one. The ending was frustrating for me because I wanted the woman to be able to decide her own fate. I would have understood if they couldn't be together. But, I wanted Chakotay and Kellin to be able to take charge of their lives an decide themselves what they wanted to do.

I did see some complained about the hypocrisy of Kellin in changing her position. I don't think Kellin would disagree. I think she changed as a result of her love for Chakotay. I think that is implied in the story. With that said, it probably deserved some dialogue to state that point overtly. However, a more significant flaw in the episode is that Chakotay celebrates the man's capture initially without any apparent ambivalence. I suppose you could point to his love for her to explain his lack of internal conflict. But, it would have added some interesting complexity to the narrative to add that he did not share her satisfaction at the man's capture.
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Eli
Thu, Sep 7, 2017, 1:09am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S4: Retrospect

To be clear, I believe that Seven receives blame for Kovin's death due to Janeway's behavior to her after he dies. I also concluded that the writers were suggesting her culpability in his death by the fact the "discovery" of his innocence is so heavily tied to his death in the narrative. I feel it is strongly implied that her unsupported accusations caused his death.

I added the above because I thought I should clarify the reasons why I felt Seven received blame for his death.

I also want to emphasize that I understand why Seven might want to be reflect on how to be more careful before issuing accusations. That's not my problem with the episode. I have a problem with Seven receiving blame for his death.
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Eli
Thu, Sep 7, 2017, 12:53am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S4: Retrospect

I was very upset by this episode. It was unfair to blame Seven because Kovin died fleeing the investigation. First, she didn't accuse him out of malicious intent. Second, innocent or not, he shouldn't have treated the Voyager with such antagonism and put his life in jeopardy over his fears. It's one thing for her or the Doctor to reflect on how they could have made better choices, it's yet another for Janeway to make a leap and imply they were at fault for his actions. All the characters should be held responsible for their own actions.

In conclusion, I was offended that Kovin's death was conflated with his innocence. Also, I was offended by how coarsely the writers and Janeway treated an emotionally complicated issue. Even if the Kovin was innocent, that does not mean Seven was the perpetrator.
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Eli
Mon, Sep 4, 2017, 4:39pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S4: Mortal Coil

I should correct my first sentence to read: "I thought the episode had potential, but the writers took too long with narrative exposition that establishes the conflict."

Still the writers were on the right track.
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Eli
Mon, Sep 4, 2017, 4:37pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S4: Mortal Coil

I thought the episode had potential, but it took too long with narrative exposition that establishes the conflict. By the time the conflict at the center of the episode is truly visible, the end is near and shortly thereafter the episode ends. I would have liked to see Neelix chew over the different ramifications up his near death experience and vision, perhaps adding a second vision, and then come to some sort of peace with an amended believe system. Overall there is good material here, but I feel like a full conversation never took place.
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Eli
Sun, Sep 3, 2017, 11:03pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S4: Concerning Flight

I agree with Paul Allen, and others who praised the episode. It was delightful and refreshing.

Of course, there are some hiccups in the plot: how does the mobile emitter end up on da Vinci? Why does da Vinci appear to have weeks or months worth of memories of his time with the new "prince,"? By this year, the Federation has no anti-theft technology?

Nonetheless, the magic of the episode lies in the mix of the wonderment of da Vinci at 24th century technology, his clever attempts to render it intelligible, and the hilarity of Janeway carting da Vinci around as she does some high tech sleuthing. Minor dialogue is often winning,; for example, interactions between Seven and the Doctor, Harry and Tuvok in separate instances are nicely understated. The highlight of the episode is seeing Janeway and da Vinci gliding through the air and vanishing via transporter. The scene recalls ET, but with a touch of silliness. Overall, an endearing and entrancing episode.
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Eli
Fri, Sep 1, 2017, 6:50am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S4: Nemesis

To be clear, in my second sentence I meant: It would have been interesting to juxtapose the perspective of the opposing group with the perspective of the initial group Chakotay meets. Unfortunately, by the end we really know neither perspective; the first perspective we hear about turns out to be an untruthful perspective, while the second perspective is never truly verbalized.

Still, like I said, there are redeeming moments here due to some Chakotay character development.
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Eli
Fri, Sep 1, 2017, 6:40am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S4: Nemesis

The episode is too extreme. It would have been interesting to juxtapose the perspective of the opposing group after Chakotay had been immersed in the culture of the first group. Instead of a complex contrast, the audience is left with a gotcha ending that only allows for limited conclusions to be reached.

Ultimately, my main problem with the episode is that the audience is not given the data to judge for themselves what might be occurring here. It seems to me the only data points we receive are: first culture attempts to brainwash Chakotay, second culture rescues him, and very little else of consequence.

Also, I agree with a lot of Skeptical's points.

I will say though, I like Beltran as an actor, and Chakotay as a character, and so the episode has some redeeming qualities as a psychological portrait of the first officer.
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