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Cail Corishev
Fri, Aug 30, 2013, 8:37pm (UTC -6)
Re: Star Trek Into Darkness

"The new fans who've never seen Star Trek before. They're hooked now."

I'd be happier about these movies if I believed that, but I don't. I just don't see that the kind of new fans who are pulled in by a big-budget, action-heavy, "dumb fun" flick are going to be drawn to small-screen, talky, idea-exploring Trek, either the old shows on DVD or something new that might be created. They'll go watch the next big-budget, action-heavy, "dumb fun" flick, regardless of whether it has Star Trek in the title.

Some kids I know are really into some superhero cartoons produced in recent years, like Ultimate Spiderman and Justice League Unlimited. Most episodes seem to consist of 2-3 minutes of angsty high-school-quality romance and navel-gazing and 20 minutes of fighting, shooting, and otherwise zapping each other and knocking down buildings.

So I thought they might enjoy watching some of the original series that introduced those characters and gave them actual stories to work with. Nope. It took them about 30 seconds to declare those boring and go back to their noisy shoot-'em-ups.

These movies are going to have to stand on their own, for whatever value they contain in themselves. They're not going to generate a new audience for the likes of Duet and Darmok.
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Cail Corishev
Fri, Jul 5, 2013, 6:44pm (UTC -6)
Re: Star Trek Into Darkness

Fascinating that no one has made the commitment to boycott the next movie.

Does boycotting this one count? "Boycott" is probably too strong a word for me, because I don't watch many movies in the theater, preferring to see how they hold up after the initial buzz wears off first. But I saw ST2009 in the theater, and that was enough to tell me I didn't need to bother with any more of this incarnation. I'm here because I enjoy Jammer's reviews in their own right, whether I've seen the movie or not. Unless this one starts getting high praise -- praise for its value as Star Trek -- I don't suppose I'll bother with it when it hits Netflix either.

If I want to watch a generic action flick with good effects, there are plenty of those around. If I want to see the Trek characters set in an alternate universe where the things we thought we knew about them may be thrown out the window to fit the writers' whims, I'll read fan-fiction. Never the twain should meet.

To the extent that a prequel was intriguing, it was because it was a chance to go back and see how our heroes got to where they were, how they became such a tight crew, and so on. But now these aren't our heroes; they're different people with different futures. Nothing they do or experience has any bearing on the TOS crew that we know. So that aspect of it is gone, and it doesn't leave much.
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Cail Corishev
Fri, Jun 28, 2013, 12:01am (UTC -6)
Re: Star Trek Into Darkness

In the many positive comments I've seen about this movie here and in other forums, the thing I keep reading over and over is something like, "I've never watched/liked Star Trek, but I really enjoyed this movie."

Somehow that doesn't seem like a good thing. I don't see these people going out and buying the DVDs of any of the series and sitting through their explosion-free talky scenes and long-term character development. They'd fall asleep during the DS9 pilot when Sisko spends several minutes trying to understand what "You exist here" means.

It seems to me that you could take the kind of budget this movie had and make any action movie and have similar success. They're not really trying to appeal to the older fan base, so they're not gaining that much by calling it Star Trek, and the franchise isn't going to gain new fans back from it, so what's the point?
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Cail Corishev
Mon, Jun 10, 2013, 5:43pm (UTC -6)
Re: Star Trek Into Darkness

Here's what I'm wondering: other movie franchises are often based on novels or comic books. When they decided to make Lord of the Rings movies, they didn't take Tolkien's characters and then hire some people who read the books 30 years ago in high school to write up a new script. They adapted the books that were already there.

Star Trek has this huge library of expanded universe writing out there. Why not buy the rights to a particularly good one and adapt it to film? Why try to force out a new idea -- and end up having to load it with homages and cheats about "separate timelines" -- when you have a universe already loaded with stories?
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Cail Corishev
Mon, Jun 10, 2013, 4:09pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S7: All Good Things...

I agree that the Leah line was strange, but I figured her husband was killed at Wolf 359, she and Geordi bumped into each other a few years later, and nature took its course. He didn't have to wreck anyone's marriage.

I think the main reason this episode beats What You Leave Behind is that this one is self-contained. WYLB is the culmination of an excellent series of episodes that tell a more complex story than TNG ever would have attempted, but as a single episode it's not that special except for the parting scenes. You couldn't appreciate much of it without the context of the episodes leading up to it. AGT takes the characters we know and tells one great story that you can enjoy even if you've never seen the rest of season 7, so it truly stands out by itself.
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Cail Corishev
Thu, Feb 21, 2013, 1:55pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S5: Empok Nor

I enjoy this one, though I concede most of Jammer's objections. On the conversation on the Runabout at the beginning: it made me realize we've never seen Garak and O'Brien interact much on the show before, which is interesting. Both men have become close to Bashir over the last 4-5 years, but not to each other. Why? Maybe because of what leaked through in that scene: Garak resents Chief's reputation as a Cardie-killer, and Chief still isn't particularly comfortable around Cardassians.
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Cail Corishev
Thu, Feb 21, 2013, 8:24am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S5: Soldiers of the Empire

I like this one quite a bit; the bookends of Worf and Martok seeing into each other's souls and being there when the other is weakening as a man work well for me. It loses half a point for Jadzia tagging along and playing Tough Grrl (I realize she was needed to help Worf see past his hero worship, but her pushing Klingons around because she remembers once being a guy who used to hang with them a lot is silly; the honorary-Klingon-Dax thing was really overdone by this point), and maybe another half-point because it's annoying when the characters claim something must be "fight to the death" and then when no one dies everyone's fine with that. So a solid 3 at least for me.
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Cail Corishev
Tue, Jan 8, 2013, 11:45am (UTC -6)
Re: ENT S1: Broken Bow

I'm finally watching this series, more for completeness's sake than anything else, having seen all the others. So I was pleasantly surprised to enjoy this episode quite a bit.

Bakula was great as an aging quarterback in Necessary Roughness, and he fits well here in the same kind of role as the leader of a group of younger (or at least younger-looking and -acting) people.

The Vulcans don't make much sense. In First Contact, the Vulcans showed up to welcome humans into the fraternity of spacefaring races as soon as they developed warp drive. Why? Sure, it gives them a chance to counsel patience, but why show up at all and reveal that there's so much out there to find? Why not just blast the thing out of the sky, or capture it and make it disappear? They seem awkwardly caught between wanting to keep humans bottled up so they don't run around making a mess of the galaxy, yet not willing to take charge and simply cordon off Earth with mines for a century or so. Also, why give them info in drips and drabs so they have to go exploring blind and run into who knows what, when they could give humans a map to all the safest planets and let them use that for training wheels? Make up your minds, guys.

After watching this episode, I think I felt like it had more potential than I felt after Caretaker. It's hard to compare fairly, since I know what Voyager did with its potential, and I don't know anything about this show except that it was cut short. But after Caretaker, I pretty much knew where Voyager was headed and what sort of things it had to say. The ship was going to fly across the galaxy and have adventures along the way. It had Big Important Points to make about things like women being in charge and applying Federation values in extraordinary situations. With a couple exceptions -- the Borg being the largest -- you could see the stories lining up early on: dealing with scarcity beyond the frontier, the redemption of the bad boy in Paris, the difficulty of mixing two formerly enemy crews, the doctor following in Data's footsteps in his quest for humanity, and so on. There weren't apt to be too many surprises, and there weren't (except for how quickly some of those potential issues were glossed over).

This show, even though it's considerably constrained by future canon, feels more open-ended. I don't know where they're going, and next show they could be half quadrant away or back at Earth for repairs, so it's more like TOS or TNG in that way. Most of the characters seem more bland, but also less caricatured than Voyager's. Voyager almost did too good a job of introducing the characters, and since there was little growth, there was no need to learn much more about them after Caretaker. With Archer's group, I'm still looking forward to that.

And yes, the "shower scene" was so bad I was embarrassed for T'Pol when she's standing there at the end with nipples at attention, waiting for the director to say cut. It's one thing to write the scene and then to shoot it, but how does that get edited and printed and no one ever says, "Wait, isn't this way over the top? Do we really want to insult our viewers' intelligence this much?"
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Cail Corishev
Fri, Dec 28, 2012, 8:14pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: Time's Arrow, Part I

I grew up in Hannibal, Missouri, where Twain set his most famous books, so I've seen a few Twain imitators. This guy was more annoying than any of them. And what's with walking around at a party, pontificating in a loud voice about how stupid people are who disagree with you? Did people really do that?

I had to laugh when Data said his head was proof that he would die. "It has happened. It will happen." Come on, they've all taken Temporal Mechanics; they know there are all sorts of loopholes when it comes to time travel. The way Trek treats time, the past is endlessly malleable, so Data's head proved nothing at all, except that it was really dumb to go straight to the only planet where he could pick up the bacteria they found with the head.
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Cail Corishev
Thu, Dec 27, 2012, 7:53pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: I, Borg

Altair77 nailed it: this is pure sentimentalism. The argument was never the one from BSG where they agonized over whether wiping out another species is acceptable in self-defense. (That was the point where I stopped watching that show. The answer is, "Yes, stupid.") Everyone was on board with wiping out the Borg, and objectively they all agreed that putting a "virus" in a drone was a great way to do it. Even freakin' Guinan, normally the poster child for giving peace a chance, was like, "Strap the bombs to it and push it out the airlock already." If they could have simply uploaded the virus a la Independence Day, they would have done it in a second and had a party while Hugh and trillions of other Hughs died.

That only changed because they met the drone and had their heart-strings pulled. So they were really saying, "We won't kill this person in front of us for the self-defense of trillions of lives including ours and our families'." That may be an argument worth having, but it's pretty shaky and built on nothing but sentiment.

I still enjoy the episode, though. I disagree with their decision, but it's in character for them to make it. It's that Trekkian optimism that peaked in TNG, that says you can take whatever rarified, righteous, moral stand you like, and things will work out okay anyway. I prefer DS9's (or Farscape's) more realistic take, but the TNG viewpoint is a nice fantasy to indulge in.
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Cail Corishev
Wed, Dec 26, 2012, 11:26pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: The Perfect Mate

I had to stop watching this one after about 30 minutes because I was falling hopelessly in love with the woman. That face, that voice .... "becomes the perfect match for the man she's talking to" indeed. Yowza.
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Cail Corishev
Wed, Dec 26, 2012, 10:50pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: Cause and Effect

This may have been my favorite episode of the entire series when I watched them first-run back in the day, and I still enjoy it now. It's the rare time travel show that doesn't feel like a complete Reset Button at the end, because they are learning throughout and don't lose all their memories and start over from scratch at the end.

So I can nitpick it with love. I won't repeat what others have said, but: you've got 35 seconds before a collision, and you spend 30 of them on a round-table discussion of your options? As someone else said, either solution probably would have worked if they'd hurried a little.

One nacelle gets damaged, and the entire ship blows up in a matter of seconds? Why? Apparently it caused every system across the entire ship to crash and burn, including the systems that are designed to be independent from the others so they can handle safety measures like ejecting the warp core. So much for all those "secondary backups."

Also, why Beverly? Why was she (and nine other people on the ship) so sensitive to the voices when no one else was? You'd think Deanna would be the one to sense them, but was she even in the episode? Was it just McFadden's turn in the spotlight?

Data's choice of '3' may be justified thus: a number could be transmitted as a single byte of data. Geordi said the message couldn't be very long, "maybe a single word." Maybe Data decided to play it safe by sending a one-byte message, since a word like "Riker" or "shuttle" would be several bytes, perhaps too large.
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Cail Corishev
Tue, Dec 18, 2012, 10:37am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S6: You Are Cordially Invited

My problem with the episode is that it did too good a job of convincing me that Worf and Dax shouldn't get married. Worf is far too jealous and insecure to marry a woman who thinks it's okay to be rubbing up on a half-naked hunk the night before her wedding.

And that's just the most obvious incompatibility. Worf's whole thing is that he wants life to be predictable and make sense from his perspective. He's not into nuance and tolerance for opposing viewpoints. That's why he's so into Klingon tradition, despite not growing up with it -- it makes things simple and clear: do this, don't do that, follow the rules and you're good. Yet suddenly he's signing on for a lifetime of wondering what his wife is going to do next to freak him out.

Dax's previous lifetimes only makes it worse, because he's not just marrying a woman who's much less inhibited than him and has had exponentially more and longer relationships, but has had half of them as a man. That's a level of weirdness that should send a guy like Worf running for the hills.

Yes, Jadzia is very hot, and maybe the chemistry and the sex are great. But beyond that, what's Worf getting out of it except drama and stress?
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Cail Corishev
Sun, Dec 16, 2012, 7:01pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: The Game

Seems Starfleet needs to bring back those old public service ads from the early 1900s: "Stay away from her, boys; she might have syphilis!"

The first officer goes to the galaxy's red light district and hooks up with some strange woman (although this appears to be normal behavior, from everything we've seen about Risa), and comes back a junkie. Wonder how he's still on everyone's short list for captain after that.
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Cail Corishev
Mon, Dec 10, 2012, 9:03pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S2: The Royale

I enjoy this one too. Sure, the premise is silly, but no sillier than the notion from the previous episode ("Contagion") that reading the log from an infected ship would infect your own ship.

Once past the thin premise, the rest works fine for me as a light comedy of the Anomaly of the Week variety.
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Cail Corishev
Wed, Dec 5, 2012, 12:24pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Second Chances

Watching the series back when I was about 20, one of the biggest frustrations was seeing the young, dashing Riker sitting around on the bridge while old man Picard went on one swashbuckling adventure after another. Now that I'm older, Picard doesn't seem quite so ridiculous, but the use of Riker was still disappointing. This episode was one of the few where we get to see a Riker out of Picard's shadow. Here after 8 years alone, or facing Locutus, or as an admiral in the future, he's a total bad-ass compared to the Will who hangs around being noble about being in the friend-zone with his Imzadi and passes up command after command so he can keep playing second banana to Picard.

His turn on DS9 was great for that reason too. I think he would have made a great regular or semi-regular character there as the much more relaxed, adventurous Tom. I liked Eddington well enough, but Frakes in that role over a number of episodes would have been excellent.
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Cail Corishev
Wed, Nov 28, 2012, 7:10am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: The City on the Edge of Forever

There was a stronger anti-war movement than we remember. Especially during the Nazi-Soviet Pact, Hollywood with its Communist leanings was very anti-war. That changed as soon as the Nazis broke the pact and attacked the USSR, and now all we remember is Bugs Bunny making fun of Hitler. The victors write the history books.

FDR wanted into the war much earlier, but there was considerable public resistance. There's evidence that our blockade and other activities in the Pacific were intended to provoke an attack by the Japanese. Some conspiracy theorists think FDR was even forewarned of the attack on Pearl Harbor and allowed it to happen to ensure public support for retaliation. Even if that's not true, it's clear from communications of the time that FDR wanted the USA to get into the war, and despite his strong popularity was unable to get public support for it until Pearl Harbor. (Back then presidents had to get Congress to declare war before attacking other countries, because we still had that pesky Constitution thing.)
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Cail Corishev
Sun, Oct 14, 2012, 8:25pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Starship Mine

I was 23 when this first aired, and I used to get so tired of Action!Picard. It wasn't that I didn't like him, but I liked the other characters too, especially Riker. Too often the rest of them got to sit on their thumbs while the oldest, baldest member of the crew had the adventures. The movies were even worse.

Now that I'm closer to Picard's age, his action scenes don't seem as ridiculous, but watching the episodes one right after the other instead of weekly also makes it more obvious -- "Sheesh, another one all about Picard?" Had it been more of an ensemble show, Riker could've been the one playing commando. It's easy to imagine most of the DS9 characters taking center stage in an episode like that, but TNG just wasn't that kind of show.
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Cail Corishev
Sat, Oct 13, 2012, 4:11am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Tapestry

I think 3.5 is right on the money, docking it half a star for the obviousness of the message. Picard surely knows that who you are has a lot to do with the mistakes you've made in the past and how you learned from them. He may not have realized that this one experience was so pivotal for him, but then that's probably a stretch anyway.

I think what bothered me was how Picard was so passive throughout the experience. After all, the Picard we're watching has been through that near death and all his other life experiences, and does know how to tackle risky situations with ingenuity and courage. But in this case he mostly sits around with his mouth hanging open, letting his friend seduce him without much struggle, and being unable to come up with any better alternative to the fight except to turn coward. There was no other way to handle it? Not ambushing them later when there would be more favorable conditions, or bringing a few more friends, or even just going to the fight wearing some body armor? He just didn't seem to be trying.

The point I found most interesting was the way Picard loathed the idea of being just a hard-working cog in the wheel that is a Federation starship. It makes sense that, for him, because he's used to a different life, it would be hard to settle for that. But to say that he'd rather be dead was kind of striking, because he does realize that most people don't ever get to be captains, right? They get decent jobs that they plug away at, day after day, and manage to enjoy life somehow anyway. His instant rejection of that kind of life was interesting, as it showed off his arrogance (humility certainly wasn't the lesson Q was teaching here). It didn't make him more likable, but that wasn't the point.
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Cail Corishev
Wed, Oct 10, 2012, 11:50am (UTC -6)
Re: ENT S1: Dear Doctor

"Archer "played God" by having the audacity to predict complex outcomes, not by his actions."

Agreed. The first DS9 episode about the genetically enhanced wackos made the same mistake, at least at first. You can't predict the future of entire peoples that way, no matter how much DNA Magic you can command. I'm a fan of Asimov's Foundation series, and psychohistory makes sense up to a point -- masses of people do tend to have a kind of inertia that keeps them moving along somewhat predictable paths in ways that the individuals making up the groups do not. But Asimov's Seldon made it clear that he was talking probabilities, not certainties. The uncertainties increased as time passed (which is why there was a Second Foundation of psychohistorians to keep tweaking the equations) and there was always the chance that some unexpected variable -- even an individual like the Mule -- could throw the whole thing off.

There's simply no way they could predict the future of this society accurately enough to base this kind of a decision on it. To the objections others have made, here are more off the top of my head: what if the dying race got a bit peeved about the whole thing and decided to take the other race out with them? What if the genetic whatsit transfers to the primitive race 150 years from now, and both races end up extinct? There are just too many possibilities.

These writers, like many people today, have clearly adopted Darwinism as a religion that goes beyond the science of natural selection. As others have said more extensively, there's no "destiny" in evolution. There's certainly no predicting it. Mutations happen, and if they happen to be beneficial in their particular time and place, they may be passed on, and thus species tend to adapt to their environments over time. But most mutations are harmful or useless, and there have been plenty of evolutionary dead-ends in Earth's history, even before human interference. There's no way to know what sort of positive mutation may happen next, or whether it'll happen to be passed on.

The other mistake they make is in talking about Nature as if humans are outside it. Humans (and sentient aliens) are part of nature, even in starships. And considering the writers see evolution as a positive force for good, why not assume humanity evolved to this point for this reason: to bring cures to dying species?

Lastly, sins of omission aren't any less egregious than sins of commission. If you have the ability to cure someone and you don't, that's no better than if you give him the disease. At that point there's no choice between interfering or not; you're interfering either way, by giving it or withholding it. So they could give the cure and both species would live (with one perhaps subordinate to the other); or withhold the cure and let one species die (with the other perhaps taking its place). "Do nothing" was off the table. As such, the choice seems pretty obvious.

One last angle: turn the tables, so the primitive-with-potential culture is the one that's dying out, while the civilized-but-stagnant snobs are fine and don't particularly care. Now would our heroes be so willing to leave things be?
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Cail Corishev
Mon, Oct 8, 2012, 8:12am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S7: Interface

"One wonders why Starfleet crews don't immediately suspect aliens with extraordinary capabilities as the solution to most unsolved mysteries, considering how often it happens."

I've thought before that if I were a starship captain, rule #1 on my ship would be that everyone has a complete scan for alien infiltration at least weekly. In fact, maybe we'd just build scanners into the turbolifts, so everyone would get checked every time they changed decks. And any time anyone acts out of the ordinary -- tired, sick, confused, slow to answer a question -- the ship goes to yellow alert and he's immediately transported to the brig and held there until the doctor can give him a full workout.

Yeah, it'd get annoying after a while, but just think how many dozens of alien takeovers and other attacks it would have avoided over all the series.
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Cail Corishev
Sat, Sep 29, 2012, 6:27pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S6: Unimatrix Zero, Part I

I didn't mind the queen when she seemed to be an appendage the hive could create when it made communication with individuals easier. But as an actual leader complete with twirling villain mustache, she could never be as scary as an entire cube saying in one voice, "We are Borg."

It would've helped if she'd kept referring to herself in the first-person plural, though. "Bring us the data" is at least a hundred times spookier than "Bring me the data" any day.
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Cail Corishev
Sat, Sep 29, 2012, 8:28am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S6: Life Line

Excellent acting makes it a worthwhile episode, but the premise violates everything the show has told us for 6 years about the doctor's program. Typical Voyager disrespect for its own consistency.

On one hand, they stress that there's room for only a very small amount of data. Janeway even stresses that everyone better keep their notes short, so they can include something from everyone. So we're talking kilobytes, maybe megabytes, certainly not gigabytes.

On the other hand, we've been told that the doctor's program is so unbelievably large and complex that the ship can't possibly make a copy of it. Words like zettabyte have been thrown around. How's that fit in a floppy disk's worth of data?

Just to make it obvious: the entire crew could have dictated their notes to the doctor, and he'd have no trouble remembering them and taking them with him as a tiny fraction of his memory. But this never occurs to anyone.

The worst thing about Voyager's inconsistencies is that they're so often unnecessary. Why have the "very short message" premise at all? The suddenness of the discovery was enough to keep their messages short anyway, if they didn't like the idea of allowing too much information to be shared. The doctor could have gone, along with the messages they could throw together quickly, and it makes sense. And I just thought that up while I was typing. Why couldn't the writers?
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Cail Corishev
Fri, Sep 28, 2012, 9:12pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S6: Memorial

Neelix needed a punch in the face at the end. My take was that he couldn't give up wallowing in emotions -- even someone else's emotions. You can teach people about an atrocity without raping their minds and leaving them with PTSD or suicidal tendencies. You could even let them live through it, but followed by the realization that it wasn't real. They'd still learn whatever walking in those shoes was supposed to hit them over the head with, but wouldn't be damaged or sent off on some quixotic mission to right their wrongs.

Kind of a cop-out at the end, putting a buoy in place. It reminded me of a couple earlier episodes when we saw that other cultures see Voyager as a sort of drive-by catastrophe -- they zoom into the neighborhood, turn everything upside down, and zoom off. Here, they leave a buoy that more-or-less walls off the memorial -- but then they're gone, so someone could take the buoy down the next day and have it right back up.
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Cail Corishev
Fri, Sep 28, 2012, 8:54pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S6: Virtuoso

When the doctor said Janeway would let Harry Kim leave the ship to shack up with a local girl, I expected her to say, "Hell no! I'd remind him that he took an oath to Starfleet and made a commitment to this ship, and to get his ass back to his station!" Starfleet has no concept of AWOL? And in Voyager's case, with the small crew she has to work with, she could afford walk-offs even less. More sensibly, she'd tell him to bring her along to boost their population.

The doctor is not only the only real doctor on a ship decades from home, but he's also the only person who's been able to save the ship on more than one occasion when all the humanoids were powerless, and that's likely to happen again. Before letting him go, you'd have to boot up his backup copy, or ask the locals to make a copy of him (since the show stupidly claimed the ship can't).

One thing I never understood: the locals were fascinated by the music itself, but especially by the mathematical aspects of it. So why were they so fascinated by the doctor in particular? His singing wasn't any more mathematically complex than what the other musicians on the ship were doing -- probably less so than most. So why weren't they mobbing all the musicians? It didn't really make sense for them to focus so much on the doctor, and in the end, it turned out they only wanted him for his music, so why the fangirl stuff earlier....doesn't make sense.
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