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Beth
Tue, Dec 23, 2014, 10:59am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: Journey to Babel

I concur with everyone above - a wonderfully made episode, 4 star treatment all around. This episode is so foundational, with its exploration of Spock's parents and past, so large in scope with a Federation focus that feels like an interplanetary collective with the Tellerites and Andorians, and not just some Earth-focused abstracted bureaucracy. It's also so dramatic with great tension over the murder/spy plot, Sarek's threatened life, and Spock's harrowing (and Mother-infuriating) decision based on absolute devotion to the rules and regs vs. Kirk and McCoy's clever circumvention of Spock's determinations.

I also agree that it's kind of too bad that the Andorians and Tellerites didn't get much play in later series, except for Enterprise (and the Andorians in particular were quite the highlight on that otherwise hit-and-miss, often lacklustre show).
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Beth
Thu, Dec 18, 2014, 11:46am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: The Apple

I hated this episode when I first saw it, and I still hate it. It's only fun is for a few good Red Shirt deaths, and the Yeoman actually kicking the ass of some People of Vaal instead of doing the usual things she does in this episode, such as whining, asking a question that no one can really answer (how reproduction happens on this planet - cue unnecessarily awkward *SEX* speculation), and being the stereotypical blonde git whose idea of seducing Chekov (LOL, "Pav") is to ask him dumb blonde questions.

Actually, everyone is annoying in this episode, except maybe Spock, who seems to be the sole voice of reason. Like, why is their way of life so reprehensible? Ohhh right, because the "plot" demands some forced conflict. I kind of wanted to slap McCoy for his stupid arguments, and Kirk for his asinine speech to the People of Vaal at the end on how they'll just enjoy this new life of toil so much ("HEY GUYS! You get to have the SEX now! Maybe you'll figure out how to reproduce! *crowd laughs at this for some reason*).

I especially wanted to phaser McCoy and Kirk for their dumb joke that Spock looks like Satan. Like Spock's NEVER heard that one before. Or maybe he hasn't, considering that pointy ears and arched eyebrows doth not the Devil make!
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Beth
Wed, Dec 17, 2014, 4:11pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: Mirror, Mirror

Oh my goodness, I just love this episode! 4 stars, for sure. Uhura gets to be bad-ass (with her dealings with Sulu, with the phaser-taking from Marlena, just all around awesome), Evil "Scarface" Sulu and Evil Chekov are GREAT, and Spock isn't even evil in the Mirror universe, just a logical man trapped in a brutal, illogical empire.

I dig the goatee too - I guess they were thinking that would make Spock look more like the Devil, eh? Well, devilishly handsome, maybe.

I wonder if anyone on here had considered how the Mirror Universe came to be, and why it was so easily accessible? And is it truly a Mirror Universe, or just one where Earth, Starfleet and the UFP is upside down into an Imperial Earth bent? It's been noted that in later excursions into the Mirror Universe in DS9 etc. that alien cultures behave much the same as they otherwise would, only more aggressively towards a Terran Empire that is asking for a walloping.

My theory (which isn't really mine) is that the Mirror Universe came to be when McCoy stepped into The Guardian of Forever. The episode's events did put right the timeline of events for the "normal" universe that the USS Enterprise crew knows. But perhaps that other timeline, where the Nazis won WWII and conquered the world, still existed as the split-off Mirror Universe? It might explain why the Terran Empire incorporates a tradition of fascistic salutes, among other things. Anyway, it's just a possibility...
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Beth
Wed, Dec 17, 2014, 1:14pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: Amok Time

In answer to Sagiam I.K., perhaps Spock is not 10x stronger than Kirk on Vulcan because Spock is, on Vulcan, subject to the thinner atmosphere and higher gravity which gives a Vulcan his "super strength" when the air volume and gravity are set to human standards. But then again, Kirk would have still been hard pressed to breathe properly while fighting, and lifting those weapons should have been much harder for him. So maybe the Plak Tow (blood fever) does something to weaken the Vulcan in this situation. Or, it's also possible that despite the Plak Tow's influence, Spock was actually trying as hard as he could to restrain his full impulse to fight with all his might, and to instead go easy on Kirk, while making it *seem* like he was going all-out for blood. Being that he's half-human, perhaps the Plak Tow doesn't have *quite* the same hold on his mind as it does for a full-blooded Vulcan. [Given that he only underwent Ponn Farr for apparently the first time in his thirties, after thinking that he "might have been spared" from it, it does seem plausible that the Ponn Farr would affect a half-Human half-Vulcan differently than a typical Vulcan]. --> And yes, the regenerated Spock on the Genesis planet did undergo Ponn Farr as a teenager, but perhaps the Genesis effect didn't just accelerate his growth, but also intensified or ignited that which would have otherwise been largely dormant post-adolescent impulses.

Anyway, back to the Amok Time fight: Maybe Kirk was just very effective at evading most of the swipes and jabs and thwacks that came his way, and he didn't need to match Spock's Vulcan-adapted strength to fend him off for most of the fight - well, until the choking happened, which happened to coincide with McCoy's gamble of knock-out medicine.

Oh well, in any case, it wouldn't have been as fun a match if Spock had sliced Kirk in two with the Lirpa or beaned him in the noggin with the Ahn'woon right off the bat, would it?
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Beth
Wed, Dec 17, 2014, 12:43pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: Who Mourns for Adonais?

Ohh this episode... I just wanted to smack some sense into Scotty-the-Suddenly-Thick-Brained-Caveman, and give Lt. Palamas (aka Lt. Pajamas) another few whacks in the head. (And why the heck do all these pretty and easily-manipulable officers with "specializations in myth and antiquity" keep popping up on a ship of deep-space exploration? Ahhh, plot convenience, of course. Or as some might call it, poor writing).

I really wished for this episode (as with a few other Trek episodes) to have a stronger-minded woman to stand up and think a little on her own, who's more like the Number One from "The Cage", logical and focused on duty to her ship and crew, rather than some flimsy mimsy, being so easily swayed by some hunky two-bit "god" and a fancy-schmancy dress or robe. GRRR.

At least Kirk was able to put some sense into her and Lt. Palamas FINALLY spurned Apollo's affections with the cold sarcasm they deserved. (Too bad Kirk's speech smacks of, erm, R-A-C-I-S-M, but it gets the plot from A to B effectively enough).

I did feel kind of bad for Apollo at the end - like I felt bad for Charlie X or Trelane or any other god-power-being who meddles too far with the Enterprise crew and meets their sad fate. But as others above have pointed out, what the heck was Apollo DOING - and why would he think "Hey, I know, those humans will just come and worship me again after, um, growing past the whole god thing." And it had to be Apollo that didn't see the end for him coming - so much for his supposed wisdom!
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Beth
Wed, Dec 17, 2014, 12:27pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: The Changeling

Ah yes, yet ANOTHER episode where Kirk "outwits" the machine with self-destructive "logic". But wow, I was face-palming through a lot of this. From Spock's mind-meld (with a tin can?) to Uhura going from pre-school English to "College level" in a short time (wtf, do they have some kind of learn-by-osmosis machines in the 23rd century, ala the "lesson feeds" in "The Matrix"?), to the lovely (laughable) Nomad-perspective camera angles, to Kirk's TERRIBLE joke at the end that REALLY made me put palm to face...

And yet, it was still an enjoyable episode, and I could get past the hokeyness and silliness. It was also interesting to see this story again, and realize what I somehow hadn't realized before: "Oh hey, this is where they got that whole V'Ger thing from The Motionless Picture!" [The movie being a slightly different case, where the story was oversimple and the plot not all that well thought-out, and the pace plodding with somewhat stiff acting, but nonetheless still was somehow an enjoyable thing to sit through].

I give it 1.5 out of 4. Stupid, but fun.
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Beth
Wed, Dec 10, 2014, 2:11pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: The City on the Edge of Forever

Oops I meant "that somehow the survival of a pacifist could prevent America from joining WWII...". Her death, of course, supposedly stops that chain of events from happening.
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Beth
Wed, Dec 10, 2014, 2:08pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: The City on the Edge of Forever

Well, much has been said about this episode already. I loved it, personally. Such great acting on all parts (I found DeForest Kelley's rendering of a mad McCoy breaking down in front of that hobo to be particularly moving). And good work on Joan Collins' part too (though part of me wondered what a clearly English emigree was doing across the pond in the US. Oh well, I guess they don't have to explain that).

I also have always found it hard to buy the central premise of the episode - that somehow the death of a pacifist could prevent America from joining WWII, and that would somehow give the Nazis time to construct an Atom Bomb. Pearl Harbour aside, I don't get the impression that the Nazis were even *close* to constructing a functional atomic bomb by 1941, or even 1944. That said, even if they were close (indeed, even they had been testing atomic weapons, which some eye witnesses claim had happened), did they really have the capability to bomb the heck out of ALL their enemies? Britain maybe, but how about Russia and the U.S.? That might have pushed the U.S. to enter the war then, and the Russians to develop that A-Bomb A.S.A.P. In any case, Japan can't really be taken out of the picture. Even if Pearl Harbour hadn't happened (though I don't know how it would not have), they might have done something to trigger kick-back offensives on the U.S.'s part, or Russia's.

Anyhoo, good episode. 4 stars for sure.
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Beth
Thu, Dec 4, 2014, 2:22am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: A Taste of Armageddon

I love this episode - had never seen it before now. Kirk is awesome, Scotty is awesome, Spock is awesome, even the Yeoman and the other redshirts have a useful role to play in this episode instead of getting killed off, and I loved that Ambassador Roger Idiot McStupid Fox (what is it with Ambassadors and Commodores being such assholes??) finally learned his error and his lesson and got a chance to do his job for real, instead of being disintegrated.

Although, what happened to the Ambassador's attache? He seems to just die while propped up on his legs. WTF?

As for this whole thing being a violation of the Prime Directive... come on, pretty much every TOS episode was in violation of the Prime Directive somehow. Kirk was a man of decisiveness and bold action, and was not one to ponder about the long-term consequences of those actions. Also, I think the people of Eminiar VII lost their right to non-interference under the Prime Directive when they claimed the Enterprise as a "casualty of war". Like someone above said, Kirk might have let them be with their computerized war, but there's NO WAY he's going to let anyone destroy his ship or disintegrate his crew!

And I agree that Shatner as Kirk is excellent, especially in episodes like these. He doesn't need to be subtle and act with grace - his emotive and brash demeanour IS what Kirk is like; it embodies the passionate boldness and sometimes stern coldness of his character.

Shatner CAN act just fine, when properly directed. His Kirk in "The Motion Picture" was a flat rehashing of '60s Kirk, with no innovations in character. That Kirk was also far too cold and petty in that film, the way he subterfuged Decker's command out of transparent jealousy and a craving for control. But Shatner's Kirk in "The Wrath of Khan" became a bit more subtle and depressed, reflecting an aging Kirk who hates getting old and hates that he's a shipless Admiral, and really hates that there isn't a damn thing he can do about it. And don't tell me that Shatner's acting didn't elicit any tears or any pathos at all when, while stifling tears, he described Spock as "the most...human" person he'd ever known. Even his defeated and deflated, "No..." when Spock dies feels jarring, as the shock of losing someone you love naturally would feel. [A far cry from the pointless "death scene" for Kirk, and hilariously inserted "KHAAAN!" line by Spock, in ST: ID]. I think Nicholas Meyer and Harve Bennett deserve some credit for getting Shatner to hit the notes just right. Anyway... enough TWOK luuurve.

So yep, a solid 3/4 episode. Classic stuff.
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Beth
Thu, Dec 4, 2014, 1:32am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: Space Seed

Ahh, Space Seed, the episode that launched a movie plot that saved a franchise...and Ricardo Montalban and his hot charisma that I wish had been played as Mexican, which he was, rather than "Sikh" (because they're such great warriors - uhhh okaay?). And yes, I AM on Team Montalban, and Team Montalban's Chest. :p

I would swoon a-la-McGivers at this episode, but there's far too many laughable and dumb things about this episode that left me giggling, facepalming, and sometimes cringing.

Much of these dumb things have been mentioned already. Kirk must have had quite the brain-fart to just let Khan access all the ship's technical manuals. DURRR. And the way that McGivers just collapses into a submissive, controlled woman who "loves" Khan - that's a real cringer there. But thankfully, the giggles and facepalms far outweigh the cringes in this episode. From the laugh-out-loud obvious stunt doubles (in an otherwise ridiculous fight, that Kirk wins via "heavy" plastic thingamajig) to the very start of the episode where they just turn on the ship and try to revive Khan right then and there, instead of towing the ship to the Starbase first - but then we wouldn't have this episode. We'd have Khan trying to conquer a Starbase - AND THEN, THE UNIVERSE! And possibly succeeding in such an endeavour. And, of course, we wouldn't have the stage properly set for The Wrath of Khan, my favourite Star Trek film. :)

I'll give the episode credit for the terror and abuse that Uhura and the crew go through at the hands of the Ubermenschen (which was well played by all), plus the Death-By-Decompression that nearly killed Kirk. And of course, Montalban as Khan pretty well steals the show with his charm and calculated cruelty.

Oh, and the biggest cringer of all: How this whole episode is basically an unconscious love letter to Colonialism. The whole idea that the British criminals on the original Botany Bay "tamed a continent".... yeahhh, no. Plus all the side-praise for conquering figures of the past like Alexander and Napoleon. And why the admiration for Khan? Oh sure, the episode says that we can admire a person while also despising them. But conveniently for the episode, no one in the 24th Century remembers Stalin or Mao in such a light.
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Beth
Mon, Dec 1, 2014, 11:01am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: Court Martial

I loved this episode, esp. the courtroom scenes, where Samuel T. Cogley is arguing the merits of man vs. machine. It reminded me of a very different courtroom scene on TNG, where Data's very status as a living being was on trial, in "The Measure of a Man". I wonder what Mr. Cogley would have thought of the JAG's ruling in that case (hell, with life spans the way they are in the 23rd and 24th centuries, he might have been alive to hear about it. Unless he's such a Luddite that he'd refuse medical assistance to stretch his lifespan).

I also enjoyed the fact that the "white noise maker/silencer" is just a microphone. :p Also, that the heartbeats are amplified, but no other bodily organ/process is. We should be hearing a deafening whirr of the computer's instruments, and loud burbles of gas moving through several colons. :D

80 years later on the Enterprise D, all they'd have had to do was ask the computer, "Where is Lt. Cmdr. Finney?" or that didn't work, scan the ship for life signs and pinpoint his location that way.

And you've got a point, Jammer, about why in the heck this particular officer death would be suspect at all. I guess it's because it happened on-ship, not on an alien world or due to any alien/viral influence, and because the computer logs quickly put Kirk's remembrance of the situation into question.
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Beth
Mon, Dec 1, 2014, 6:11am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: Tomorrow Is Yesterday

I enjoyed this episode. I would give it 3.5 stars out of 4. It was a very good ep., but not perfect. Especially with the goofy time-warp stuff that provided such a neat and tidy ending. I have to say that I wasn't really looking forward to re-watching it on Netflix, but it was more enjoyable than I remembered it being. And hey, it provided a basis for "A Voyage Home", goofy 'science' and all. :)

Also, I found it funny that the military people watching the skies immediately presumed, "UFO! Let's go look at it, and maybe blow it up!" Wouldn't they really have thought, "OMG, it's mysterious Russian technology sent to blow us sky high! We'd better blow it up NOW. Nuclear missiles at the ready!" In reality, the Enterprise probably wouldn't have stood a chance of survival.
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Beth
Sun, Nov 30, 2014, 10:40pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: The Squire of Gothos

I agree with the rating pretty much, but I had fun watching this episode. Trelane is a delightfully spoiled brat, and the actor plays that role well. I didn't mind the ending. Yeah, it's not as good or nearly as tragic as "Charlie X", but it was fun nonetheless.

As an aside, I'm also glad that the Wiki for "Trelane's Parents" confirmed that the voice of the father was NOT James Doohan. I'd heard that it was, but it didn't sound anything at all like his voice.
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Beth
Sat, Nov 29, 2014, 7:10am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: Shore Leave

So this is a 3/4 for you, eh? Meh, It's a 2/4 for me. A fun episode, but the crew are pretty dense for not getting the connection between their thoughts and what was appearing. It also seemed like as soon as Kirk encountered Ruth or Finnegan, he completely lost all sense. But I suppose that's the machinations of these menageries at work. And the big reveal at the end was okay, but not earth shattering or anything. It's a middling episode for me.

One thing I'll say - I rather envy that chick who caught McCoy's fancy. DeForest Kelley was pretty dang hot! (Nimoy and Shatner are pretty shaggable too, I'd say).
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Beth
Sat, Nov 29, 2014, 5:46am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: Balance of Terror

P.S. It just boggled my mind a bit that there's less distance in time between first season TOS and The Wrath of Khan than there is between the final season of TNG and now. O_O
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Beth
Sat, Nov 29, 2014, 5:42am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: Balance of Terror

2.5 stars again? (After the last ep.) Jammer, you're a tough customer sometimes. ;)

I didn't even notice the cheap-looking Romulan bridge - I was more focused on the characters and what the Romulans were doing and thinking.

And yeah the helmets are funny looking, and obviously a cost-saving measure - but Romulan wardrobe has always been funny-looking, even when TNG got a much bigger budget than TOS ever had. Perhaps alien sensibilities cannot be expected to match ours? Perhaps to Romulans, those helmets and, later on, the (to us rather goofy-looking) giant grey quilted shirts with giant shoulder pads look the epitome strength and power. They are a warlike people, after all, plus they are also rigidly heirarchical, so it makes sense that they would value a show of strength and status in their dress. Klingons were never fashion plates either, although their Japanese-inspired uniforms look more badass to our human eyes. And Cardassian fashion is no fashion at all - purely utilitarian and, to us, very ugly. A reflection of their highly militarized, and by human standards, oppressively fascistic culture.

Also: Something in the traditional robes of Vulcan culture harkens back to a common culture with the Romulans. Such clothing is also kind of funny-looking to us, and seems to be very concerned (against the logic of modern Vulcan culture) with a display of status and power (esp. in the resplendent robes T'Pau is wearing, compared with the Vulcan guards around her in "Amok Time"). Romulan culture retained some of that, but their clothing perhaps isn't as strangely beautiful as Vulcan traditional clothing because in leaving Vulcan, as much as they did take the violence and obsession with duty and power, they had no room on their ships for beauty and softness and colourful fabrics, not when riding off to conquer a new home and a new empire for themselves.

Anyway, this episode rates as a 4/4 for me. This calibre of a cat-and-mouse space battle is partly what made "The Wrath of Khan" great some 16 years later, and it makes this episode shine too. The acting on all fronts is spot-on. (And I believe much of the "angst" of the Romulan commander is due to him losing his best and oldest friend so rapidly in battle. And even before that, it might reflect a weariness of not knowing whether he can fulfill his duty while also ferrying him and his crew back to home, alive. Maybe he knows, on some level, that his end is near, and his despair shows). I also thought the b-plot of the never-to-be-married Tomlinson and Martin to be tragic, but also helpful as a window to what operations are like in the lower decks. When Kirk yells "Fire!" on the bridge, what actually has to happen to fire that torpedo? It's evidently not like it is in TNG, when presumably the computer does the firing, and more like a submarine in action. (Which helps with the submarine battle theme).

Anyway, I could go on about this episode, but for me, it's one of the best of Trek, and a real gem of Season 1.
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Beth
Sat, Nov 29, 2014, 4:20am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: The Conscience of the King

After reading DutchStudent82's suggestions as to how to improve this episode, I'm rather glad he didn't get an opportunity to write for this episode, esp. considering the "improved" final scene. But I do give Dutch credit for recognizing a lot of the plot holes - and there are many.

Also, as an aside: The innocent, but potentially criminal, should be locked up? What happened to "Innocent until proven guilty"? We don't need no Minority Report, thanks.

Anyway, re: the actual episode: I'm surprised that the rating is 2.5 stars and not 3, all because of assumptions made about the ending, which don't seem warranted. (But I'll forgive you, Jammer, since this review is 16 years old now, and maybe you weren't watching this episode as closely back then). I didn't read McCoy's words as "her memory was wiped", and I didn't read any snideness in Kirk's "answer" to McCoy's question as to whether he cared a lot for her. All he has to do is give him a look, because despite all that's happen, and all the pain and confusion of prior events, he does still care for her, and his feelings for her were real.

Well, I look forward to getting to Balance of Terror now. I'll be surprised if I turn to the next page and the rating isn't 4 stars!
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Beth
Wed, Nov 26, 2014, 6:07am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: Dagger of the Mind

I really enjoyed this episode, and I agree with the rating. The brainwashing/memory-inducing machine reflects the times, when treatment for the mentally ill commonly involved lobotomy and eletro-shock therapy [the latter of which is, yes, still used today, but not as much as it was then]. It also reflects the fact that such treatments, and the conditions of mental institutions, were beginning to be perceived as controversial and highly problematic.

The mental undoing and death of the sick-minded Dr. Adams was particularly poignant, as was Kirk's expressions at the end of the show. It showed that, while he was able to fight the effects somewhat, this "therapy" will stick with him for some time...

...Which makes it unlikely that Dr. Van Gelder would be so quickly reinstated as head of the appropriately-named Tantalus IV Penal Colony. I should think that Van Gelder would need a few weeks or months of real therapy to bring him back to a better state of mind. Or maybe that mind-meld worked wonders on him (which makes one wonder what the long-term effects might have been on Spock).

The only minus for this episode was Dr. Noel (who met Kirk at the Xmas party, har har), the ditzy doctor who is too thick and arrogant to clue into the things that Kirk is noticing about the inmates at Tantalus. At least she was pretty competent in getting the power turned off and kicking the other guy's arse into the high-voltage power unit. Damn, girl, that was smooth!

One small plus that makes up for Dr. Noel's blue panties being visible under her mini-mini skirt is Lethe's really nice poncho dress. I'd kind of like to have me one o' those.

Also, on another topic, I remember what handle I had before - it was Lal. But it's easier to just go by Beth now. :)

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Beth
Wed, Nov 26, 2014, 2:29am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: Mudd's Women

I thought this episode was one of those bad, but entertaining, ones. I like Mudd as comic relief (esp. during the little trial scene with the obstinate computer chiming "INCORRECT". The "police record" is amusing too - it looks so '60s. Like they couldn't have white text on a black background to make it look like something from the future? Oh well, cost-cuts and oversights like that are forgivable.

It's somewhat harder to forgive the overt sexism of all the guys ogling at the women, but it's not nearly as bad as some Star Trek episodes. ("Turnabout Intruder" comes to mind as a particularly one-legged and stupid example, with the idea that women STILL cannot be Captains of vessels in the 23rd Century as "stand-in" for 1960s workplace sexism).

I chuckled a little when Sulu's guiding one over-smitten crew member back to his place on the bridge, and tells Spock that he HAS noticed the women. And yet he's so much more calm and seemingly far less affected than the rest of them? Nice cover, George, I mean, Sulu. :p

Also, one thing that the episode never explains: Why DID the presence of one of Mudd's women cause the medical scanner to "boop-boop" weirdly? I hadn't seen this full episode before, so I thought for sure the drugs they were taking were causing their bodies to create fields that interfered with the ship's functions, causing it to lose even more power. But this Venus drug just gives you "more of whatever you have". Does that include more gut bacteria, more electricity, more energy burning producing more heat, duplicate organs, more excrement? LOL.

And the ending is pretty cheesy. "Think of yourself as beautiful on the inside and you'll have perfect makeup and a neat hairdo on the outside just like that!" But I guess that's about the best that 1966 TV can do for talking about body issues and self-esteem.

Anyway, your rating is fair. It's a good hour for some giggles, but it's not a very good episode.
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Beth
Mon, Nov 24, 2014, 4:16am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Face of the Enemy

Actually, a 3 out of 4 is the right rating. I keep mis-seeing your 4-star rating as a 5-star one, for whatever reason. :p
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Beth
Mon, Nov 24, 2014, 4:10am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Face of the Enemy

I don't remember what handle I went by before, so it's just "Beth" from now on.

I just want to say that I would rate this as a a 4 star episode (as I exclaimed at the end of the episode, "What an episode!", and that doesn't happen much. Maybe it was just renewed delight at how well Sirtis played her parts, the acting and plot overall on everyone's part). I also agree with SkepticalMI's points about the episode, and about what "Nemesis" could have been. "Nemesis" really could have been the calibre of "The Undiscovered Country". It ended up being a hollow shocker with a hollow plot filled with hollow, pointless action sequences... and dune buggy rides. Ugh. No, it wasn't quite as a bad as some ST movie outings, but it was nonetheless a huge letdown.
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Elizabeth
Mon, Dec 30, 2013, 5:52am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S1: Time and Again

I didn't mind watching the episode, there were a few entertaining moments. However, I couldn't get past the fact that the aliens are identical to humans. And the reset button is really annoying! I remember as a little girl, watching 'Dallas' with my parents (apparently they thought that was appropriate viewing for an 8yo) and seeing the scene where JR's death was all a dream. I thought it was the laziest plot twist ever and that the writers should be fired. Lame!
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Elizabeth Palladino
Sat, Jul 20, 2013, 9:51pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S5: Nor the Battle to the Strong

I agree with Josh. I'm in healthcare, too, and the staff in crisis mode was very realistic. The gallows humor may have bothered Jake, but healthcare workers do use that kind of joking to defuse tension. We wouldn't do it in front of the patients or family, of course. In terms of the rating, I'm watching DS9 in order, season by season--I've never seen it before--and I would also give this episode four stars.
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Elizabeth Palladin
Sun, Mar 25, 2012, 10:51pm (UTC -6)
Re: Site Version 6.0 (2012)

Of course, what I meant was I usually like the episodes better than you do--unclear sentence--grrrr.
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Elizabeth Palladino
Sun, Mar 25, 2012, 4:43pm (UTC -6)
Re: Site Version 6.0 (2012)

Thanks for this website. I'm stuck home a lot caring for my husband (25 years older than I) who has Alzheimers. I watched some TNG's that I rented from Netflix, and fell in love with the Star Trek universe all over again. I'm buying TNG in complete series, and am re-watching the whole thing--am currently up to Shades of Grey (yeah, I know) on Series Two, and then will start Series Three etc.--then go on to all the other seasons and shows. I love watching an episode and then reading your reviews. I usually like them better than you do! Very entertaining, even the "duds." It sounds like you work very hard at what you do--know that it is more, more, more than appreciated.
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