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Trek fan
Thu, Dec 1, 2016, 12:59am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S3: Past Tense, Part I

Four stars? Seems quite excessive to me: This is no "City on the Edge of Forever." I liked the still-relevant social commentary aspect and opportunity for Sisko to shine as star of a story, but the script is total boilerplate, and I predicated *every* plot development about five minutes ahead of time. As usual on much of Star Trek, the time travel details only work as the plot dictates, with lots of technobabble covering rather average plotting. But above all else, Frank Military's "BC" character is incredibly annoying and ruined both parts of this episode for me, with badly written lines apparently designed only to generate an artificial sense of tension. Much of it defied logic, especially his arguments with the processing officer played by Dick Miller, and I really wanted Sisko to punch him in the face and tie him up for the rest of the show. Honestly, this is a bad actor doing a bad performance of badly written lines, and the fact that he plays a central role in the drama weighs the whole thing down like a lead balloon. This is average-to-good material at best, delivered in the typical '90s Trek monotone other than a few passionate Sisko moments, and I would give it 2 1/2 stars.
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Strejda
Thu, Dec 1, 2016, 12:06am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S7: Journey's End

What could have been an interesting discussion of forced relocation and deconstruction of Wesley's character instead becomes that one episode where an Indian makes Wesley a god. It's like they learned nothing form that stupid Irish episode.

Look, you could say Federation basically sold out their home but this isn't like what was done to Native Americans in US. They aren't kicking them out for their land, they are doing it for their safety. Cardassians are also known as "those guys who turned Bajor into Nazi Germany Planet for sixty-years". Yes, they are in this situation because of Federation's own decisions, but they did it to prevent a war (with admittedly, morally repugnant regime) and given that there is only enough of them to be evacuated by Enterprise, it's really not that awful a thing the episode paints it as.

Not even Wesley gives two shits about them, given that he's fine with leaving the situation to sort itself out, even though he's the one that made it escalate as it did.

Also, check out the Villain Ball on that Gul. "I don't want my son to die. So let's risk his life by sending a rescue party for no reason except they might kill few of those asshole."
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RandomThoughts
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 11:27pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S4: Little Green Men

Hello Everyone

Once, a long time ago, I watched an American propaganda war movie that was shot during '42 or so. Every time a serviceman entered a room, they asked "Smoke?". Then they would hand out cigarettes to everyone there, everyone would light up, take a few puffs, then start the dialogue. EVERY... SCENE... (might have been sponsored by a tobacco company).

Anyway, I thought of that movie while watching this. As has been commented, they seemed to be lampooning the old war movies, right down to the detail of someone seeming to light up, all the time.

Yeah, it was shot with a comedic take on, well, everything, but I wonder if that was they only way they felt they could shoot the episode. I liked it okay, and laughed at some of the jokes, but it just felt out of place to me. Like they couldn't shoot it straight, because, you know, Ferengi. It's hard to put into words, but I think it was just a bit too fluffy...

Your mileage may vary, and have a great day... RT
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Peter G.
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 9:52pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: Errand of Mercy

Great comments, Edax.

One thing about the imperialism angle: While we can be tempted to see Kirk as being "responsible" for the violence that ensued on the planet, I think it would be more fair to say that the Klingons began it, but Kirk escalated it. After all, assuming the Organians were not powerful beings, while they may have been happy to live under the Klingons the Klingons might have executed them for any old reason anyhow. Supposing that Kor commanded an Organian to harm another Organian, and he refused, no doubt the punishment for such disobedience would be death. And so while Kirk did initiate the overt violence, it would have begun regardless with or without him.

I think the cold war message takeaway here is that the Federation's claim of being there to protect or help the Organians was entirely self-serving, and that although their rationalization for staking a claim to Organia was different than that of the Klingons, functionally both sides were the same. The Federations true aim there was to defeat the Klingons, not to help some random race that they clearly didn't bother even meeting prior to the Klingons showing interest there. This is the crux of the problem in the episode: the Federation is already enmeshed in hostilities against the Klingons, so there is no way they can be coming in peace no matter how friendly they act.

That being said I'm a bit wary of episodes like this that seem to directly equate the Federation with the cold war United States, precisely because the Federation is supposed to actually be better - not merely claim to be better. I like this episode a lot, but I'm not crazy about using the Federation as a way of showing disingenuous morals.
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SteveRage
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 8:09pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S3: Let That Be Your Last Battlefield

Ugh......

Awful episode, extremely heavy handed, subtlety of a sledgehammer.

Just going to list all the bad: Cheron in the "southern" part of the galaxy, awful cartoony direction, atrocious acting, self-destruct sequence (much better inSTIII :-)), meandering plot that doesn't go anywhere, boring racism allegories.....

But my biggest issue, so Bele has been chasing Lokai for 50,000 years?!?!?!? Right...... yet they were close enough to reach Cheron in a few hours...... and in all that time neither had noticed the Cheroni had annihilated each other...... I'm all for a bit of socio-political commentary, but does it have to be this stupid?
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Edax
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 8:00pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: Errand of Mercy

I think what's missed about this message is the strong anti-imperialism theme running throughout this episode. Kirk arrives on Organia with the expressed purpose of obtaining the planet for the Federation. Ayelborne welcomes Kirk and Spock as guests, and politely declines the "offer" to join the Federation. Spock shows disdain for the Organians because they don't measure up to the Federation's standards of progress, while Kirk shows disdain for the Organians because they do not immediately adopt Federation ideals. During the episode, we are given clues that the Organians are more sophisticated then the “D-“that Spock rates them on the richter scale, given that they are clearly aware of the Galactic community, already have knowledge of the Klingons and their economic trade status (since they know that kevis and trillium D are useless to them) and the fact that they can detect the Klingon fleet in orbit while Spock can’t with his tricorder. All classic signs of the arrogant imperialist, unable to consider another culture as superior until their own military has been humbled, even Spock isn't immune to it.

Throughout the episode, the Organians have repeatedly insisted that their people believe in non-violence, but Kirk ignores them every time, because their culture is inconvenient to the Federation. When the Klingons occupy the planet, the Organians do little more than smile. Kirk never considers that the Organians might be happy under Klingon rule, since they accept it right away and smile endlessly. Instead Kirk attempts to start an armed conflict to “help” the Organians despite their every plea that he stop immediately. As a direct result of Kirk’s actions, 200 Organians are lined up to be shot, and Kirk doesn’t show the least bit of remorse, instead acting vindicated of his own actions. Ayelborne repeats “How little you understand us” again and again as the violence that Kirk has brought to their world has nearly brought him to tears. Kirk never bothers to understand the Organians, only judging them, condemning them for not following the example of the Federation of freedom and resistance. Kirk even threatens Ayelborne with violence if he wasn’t allowed to arm himself against their wishes. By his own initiative, Kirk has intervened in the Organians affairs and turned their planet into a battlefield. This all sets up for the deliciously ironic ending where Kirk demands non-interference in the Federations affairs, rendered helpless against the culture he had dismissed as unworthy.

So I don’t think the Organians being non-corporeal beings is cop out. The Organians being more advanced then the Klingons and the Federation was hinted at from the beginning, and it was only the arrogance of these two warring cultures that blinded them. The Japanese regarded the Americans as barbarians until those invincible Black Ships steamed into their harbor and forced a treaty to be signed. The Chinese dismissed the British as inferior during the lead up to the Opium War until the British Navy forced a treaty to be signed. The Organians are only serve as metaphor for a superior culture to the already advanced future world of the Federation.

As for why the Organians assume corporeal form and maintain a primitive culture, it could serve as some kind of embassy for less advanced cultures, or perhaps that was the Organian equivalent of maintaining a garden, or Chateau. They were open to visitors until violence was brought on their world, which was intensely painful to them, which provoked the Organians to action. Unlike Skeptical, I do not see this as the Organians imposing the philosophy of pacifism via violence, but rather a defense of their own culture. If the Federation and Klingons will not leave the Organians in peace, then they will make the peace because they have the power to do so.
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LCARS
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 6:43pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Relics

A great all around episode that I enjoy, and I thought it was a decently devised way for the writers to bring Scotty back, all things considering. That being said:

- I like how a portion of the show was all about the Enterprise not being able to stop it's forward momentum, then the writers suddenly threw that out the window once the door of the sphere was open so that they could turn around and fly out of there extremely quickly. Also, should I even mention how bad the scale of distances is screwed up here? The tractor beam brings them in at about one Enterprise length per 10 seconds. At that rate it would take years to reach the sun from the outer edge of the sphere.

- As others mentioned, I think it's absolutely hilarious that the episode ends saying that one (yes ONE) single science ship was being dispatched to study the sphere....are you kidding me? This should have been the find of century, with a massive race across the quadrant to travel there and being studying the inner surface and all the technological advancements that may have been present. It would take a fleet of ships a decade to barely even begin scratching the surface of this place....and once word got out of this massive find, you can bet the Romulans/Ferengi/Klingons/Cardassians etc. would all be trying to find ways to sneak in there and explore.

- I actually agree with both sides of the argument regarding how Scotty was treated on the ship. For one, I believe everyone would have been much more cordial toward him, especially Geordi. However, at the same time, Scotty had already made the decision to retire, that's why he was on the Jenolen on the first place. There should have been no reason for him to suddenly feel useless, when he had already decided to stop being a Starfleet engineer and enjoy his retirement. That being said, he would certainly be like a kid in a candy store once presented with the opportunity to see the engineering of a starship far ahead of his expertise.

- Couldn't the Enterprise have gotten a little closer before firing photon torpedoes? That way they wouldn't have been cutting it so close before exiting out the door. Also, how about waiting for the transport cycle to finish and getting confirmation that Geordi and Scotty were aboard before firing at the Jenolen?

- Just a thought, wouldn't there be the SAME tractor beam element on the INSIDE in order to open the doors and go out of the sphere, just like there was to bring ships in? That would be plain comment sense.......but you can't expect too much from writers under pressure to spit episode after episode out in a short period of time.

All in all, an entertaining episode that I keep watching.
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TS
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 4:42pm (UTC -6)
Re: ENT S2: Cogenitor

After seeing this episode and "The Breach", all I can say is: Finally!

Finally this show is tapping into it's Trekkian potential after a season that has been largely shallow and mediocre, even when compared to the below average first season.

It's been hard for me to sit through an entire episode this season, largely because my interest wanes when the writers always turn interesting plots into standard "action hour" episodes or fill it up with lackluster twists and turns. That didn't happen with "Cogenitor", which is surprising because it is a Braga and Berman episode... the same people who wrote "A Night in Sickbay" gave us this?

I was also happy to see Andreas Katsulas back on Trek one last time. And the "Dixon Hill" and "Bride of Chaotica" appearances on the film list were a great touch.

Great episode, I'm hoping it's something of a turning point for the series (probably thought the same thing after seeing "Dear Doctor" and "Shuttlepod One"...), because I have often found my first watch of this season to be tedious.
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borusa
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 4:39pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S1: Coming of Age

This was fairly watcheable but mainly because we all know Merrick is just a fleshy sack full of alien mind control parasitic worm thingies and he is gonna get his head phasered off in a few episodes.
Having something undefined going ominously wrong in the Federation is a good sub plot ,if a bit pulpy.
Like many I take issue with Wesley's academy entrance test .
Given Wesley is a super genius and fails the test we can only assume that Starfleet cadets must be representative of an infinitesimally tiny segment of the galactic population.
It is a bit of a waste to put redshirts on those guys.
Once the Borg let alone the Dominion start knocking at the door I bet they lower the standards a bit-either that or they should just use non commissioned officers and other ranks to do the donkey work on the spaceships.
I wonder if Merrick is a descendant of the merchant captain from Bread and Circuses.
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Peter G.
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 4:01pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S4: Galaxy's Child

I'd personally put aside the issue of Geordi coming in with preconceptions about Leah. We can just assert he wanted to romance her for whatever the reason; his rationale is more or less irrelevant.

The issue as I see it is really whether his conduct was proper or improper in attempting straight away to woo someone who came onto a Starfleet vessel to work with him. Whether his concept of her was accurate or not isn't pertinent to this point. The kneejerk answer will be that it was inappropriate of him to behave in that kind of unprofessional manner. However one potential lesson here is that manners in the 24th century might be more evolved than they are now. Right now making attraction for someone else felt has a better chance of offending them than anything else, and I personally view this as not ideal. I could see a case for a 24th century mentality where someone else's feelings or attempts to woo are understood and noted, but where offense isn't taken if the feeling isn't reciprocated. It would become uncomfortable, of course, were the wooer to persist over protests of disinterest. And even then we might suppose that people will be charitable enough by then that if they see someone feeling desperate or lonely they'd be understanding about it and not get upset if the person goes a bit too far.

That's not to say I don't find Geordi's behavior a little out of line, but then again I'm only a 21st century guy.
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Chrome
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 3:31pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S4: Galaxy's Child

In April, I actually I agreed he got "caught up in a fantasy". I also said he could've come off a lot better if he had explained what happened to Leah earlier instead of letting her find out on her own out of context.
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Peremensoe
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 3:16pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S4: Galaxy's Child

Chrome: "No one's saying Geordi didn't go overboard with his expectations with Leah."

No? I thought you were, back in April.
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Chrome
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 1:54pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S4: Galaxy's Child

The exact line is:

RIKER
This is a violation of protocol. Crewmembers should not be simulated in the Holodeck...

GEORDI
Ah, Commander... I don't think there's any regulation...

RIKER
Then there should be...

So, no, there's no regulation against it. However, if you had to access restricted crew profiles like Quark when he was trying to do this to Kira, then there's a problem.
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Quarkissnyder
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 1:54pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S5: Blaze of Glory

How it should have ended: Sisko picks up the red phone and calls whoever is in charge of Cardassia. "You know how you can find cloaked ships because of their exhaust stream or whatever mumbo jumbo Dax was saying? There are some cloaked missiles coming towards you. You need to hunt them down."

"Thanks for the heads up. We'll take care of it."

The end.
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Del_Duio
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 1:49pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S4: Galaxy's Child

I thought the one restriction for the holodeck was that you couldn't make a character who's an existing member of the same ship. Or at the very least it's heavily frowned upon. I think they touch on this in the episode with Barclay making some of the crew into the Three Musketeers and mini Riker (lol). Troi says that it's no big deal until she sees he's made one of her too.
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Chrome
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 1:46pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S4: Galaxy's Child

@Peremensoe

No one's saying Geordi didn't go overboard with his expectations with Leah. After Geordi's conversations with Guinan, that's a pretty clear Aesop for this episode. But Leah confesses she has her own interpersonal issues, making it hard for her to work with others.
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Peremensoe
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 1:38pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S4: Galaxy's Child

The episode overtly depicts him conflating the imagined Leah with the real one, both in terms of their work history and of their personal relationship. Failure to distinguish fantasy from reality is pretty definitionally "too far."
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Peremensoe
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 1:05pm (UTC -6)
Re: Star Trek: Discovery

Oh, of course... I now see that there is a new (June 2016) paperback edition of his primary collection, as well as a separate movie tie-in book. Not so little-known any more.
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Peremensoe
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 12:43pm (UTC -6)
Re: Star Trek: Discovery

ARRIVAL is based on a story by an relatively little-known, unprolific writer whose work I have treasured for some years--Ted Chiang. I hope the film is good, but it's hard to imagine that it is as special as the story. In any case, check him out.
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Chrome
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 12:40pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S4: Galaxy's Child

@ViveTrek

You're right in that this show was written in the 20th century and surely reflects on gender roles of its time to some degree.

As for this episode, I think you're being a little hard on Geordi. This episode is actually a follow up from season 3's "Booby Trap" where the computer actually went of its way to create a Leah Brahms character to help Geordi solve a serious engine problem. It might not be clear because this episode plays the scene for humor, but Geordi *never* used Leah's character for anything remotely sexual.

As for restrictions, I don't really see the point. The holodeck is supposed to be private and it's completely fictional. In our time, should someone be banned from writing a book about people they know and the fantasies they have about them? People are free to make these fictional creations, and, as we see in this episode, they sometimes have to deal with the consequences of their own imagination.
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ViveTrek
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 11:20am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S4: Galaxy's Child

First time watching Star Trek. I'm really liking it but this episode (which I just finished) has me in a little shock!
There are quite some episodes where it is very clear that the script writers are males from the 20th century because the traditional gender roles are all over the place.

In Star Trek TNG I have seen more than a few cases of sexual harassment, discrimination towards women or sexism. And all are being seen as normal by bystanders/colleagues/crew members? Like in this case with Georgi too: He is acting totally inappropriate and unprofessional. He goes way over the line. Even has a holo-sex-thing with her and then SHE apologizes for being upset?
It makes it for me (as a young woman) sometimes hard to watch..

Also I am surprised that there are apparently no restrictions to the holodeck? Everyone can do whatever (and whoever?) they want? ... Can someone explain this to me?

(sorry for my bad english, i'm not a native)
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Chrome
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 9:50am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S4: Indiscretion

@Rob

Why's that?
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Yanks
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 6:31am (UTC -6)
Re: Star Trek: The Motion Picture

David Pirtle,

Glad you love it. It's probably the most "Star Trek" Star Trek movie. I saw it when it came out in the theater and I was inammered.... went back and saw it 3 more times.

One of the biggest gripes I've heard about the movie, and I think I would agree is that the actors didn't think their character releationships were right. I've heard that take from a bunch of the TOS actors to include Nimoy and Walter.
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Yanks
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 6:21am (UTC -6)
Re: Star Trek: Discovery

I'm gonig to see 'Arrival' this weekend.

Nice to have some new news concerning our new series. I really like the Doug Jones choice. Lot's of SCI-FI experience and I thought he was really good in 'The Strain' and 'Falling Skies'. Don't know much about the Anthony Rapp fella. The only thing he's been in that I can remember seeing is The X-Files.
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Rob
Wed, Nov 30, 2016, 6:14am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S4: Indiscretion

This episode solidified Major Kira as my least favourite DSN character.

I'm also now convinced that Nana Visitor is just an awful actress.
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