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Gregor
Mon, Dec 5, 2016, 2:15pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S1: Encounter at Farpoint

I think most people understood exactly who Tasha (the actor) was and what she stood for - and why she left the show, and why she came back to play a short-haired, Romulan commander.

She is a great actor, but I always got a sense that her personal beliefs played a very large role is her decisions to leave and then come back later for very specific appearances.

And bless Gene Roddenberry, who was a wonderful man and welcomed her back despite her rejection of certain aspects of the Star Trek world.
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Ivanov
Mon, Dec 5, 2016, 1:51pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S1: Encounter at Farpoint

Oh dear lord I never knew Tasha Yars acting in that courtroom scene was so horrible. I mean Troi was bad but Tasha's outburst was so embarrassing it made me forget about Troi. also Q's entrance on that throne was hilarious.
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Peter G.
Mon, Dec 5, 2016, 11:30am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Chain of Command, Part I

@ Stuart,

I think the takeaway from the two-parter is that real problem wasn't anyone in Starfleet, but rather was the Cardassians. Something needed to be done to deal with them, and Jellico was it. It just so happens that Riker was the #1 on the flagship, and that he was poorly matched to serve under Jellico, but Jellico was definitely the man for the job and definitely conducted his assignment correctly. That his style was needed in that scenario is perhaps unfortunate, but its necessity came from the manner of the Cardassians, not from Nechayev.

For what it's worth, Picard even said of Riker early in the series that he had an unusual service record and that he was not high up on most Captains' lists for first officer. Picard picking him was noteworthy, and it should be remembered that the Picard + Riker combo was something Picard knew would work, but which would probably not work with most other C/O's. Riker's decorations and then offers of starships resulted from his successes on the Enterprise, but him having his own command is different than him serving under some random Captain. Riker definitely *did not* acquit himself well under Jellico, and that was none of Jellico's fault.
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Stuart
Mon, Dec 5, 2016, 10:58am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S6: Chain of Command, Part I

It seems to me that the problem was not Jellico or Riker for that matter but Admiral Nechayev. From the moment she told Riker he would not be in command in Picard’s absence she took the wind out of his sails. And it immediately set up the conflict to follow.

Consider, Riker was captain of the ship in when he saved Earth from the Borg. He was captain again when he stopped a Romulan invasion force heading for Vulcan. So it is obvious he is a tactician and a competent commander. To not be offered the Enterprise when Picard is not there would be a slap in the face. That’s how I would feel. Especially since too he was offered 3 other commands, and now he can’t have this one! I’d be pissed off too. But to his credit he continued working under Jellico as best he could. Then I feel that Jellico thought that he had to make a statement and show everyone who’s boss so he comes up with a 4 shift rotation, (it could have been anything else though) that he knew could throw things off a bit, sort of like establishing dominance in a wolf pack. He wanted to show them he is the new alpha. I mean I don’t see 3 vs 4 shifts being a problem. Then Riker says Ok, I’ll do it. And he goes Picard-style, as he would be accustomed to doing for the last 6 years, and talks it over with the department heads. Who tell him it’s too hard to do so quickly. He plans to report this feedback to Jellico but never gets the chance. Jellico chews him out…no talking…get it done! Professional or not, at that stage of my career and coming this far I would have been looking for my own ship and leave Jellico with his “precious Pearl”.

It seems to me that there are 2 styles of command, in general anyway…you can manage or you can lead. The manager is concerned with schedules and programmes and stuff, whereas the leader is concerned with developing talent below him and bring out the best in others, mentoring. Both styles are important. I reckon Jellico was a manager and Picard, and therefore by extension Riker, were leaders. I think Jellico tried too hard in the wrong way. Yes he needed to make the ship battle ready etc but the crew is a veteran crew, they know how to fight, it can’t be too hard. Even though La Forge tells Riker, he doesn’t mind the changes as he understands them, he just needs time…which Jellico feels he doesn’t have.

I don’t mind Jellico and Cox’s performance is spot on. What I am saying is that he didn’t need to be so boorish, the crew would have responded as they are trained if he’d be a little nicer. I mean didn’t stop to give a speech at the handover ceremony. He might have said something like, “Thank you Captain Picard. You have a fine crew here. I know that a change of command can sometimes be unsettling but I also know that you are well trained professionals and we will adapt to this quickly. The next few days will be a transition as you get used to my command style. There are potential dangers along the border we might face soon and you may not get a chance to know me before we are into the thick of things. In the heat of the moment, orders don’t always make sense or cannot always be explained, but if you’ll respond to my orders as you would Captain Picard’s we’ll see ourselves through this bad weather.” That would not have cost him a minute’s time and the crew would probably have understood where he was coming from. However, I guess the writers felt the need to create a little conflict with the crew.

My major problem is that the writers felt the need to shake up things by scaring the fans with a Picard leaving the show and change commanders, then reset it like it never happened. Was it really necessary to relieve him of command? What would have made things even better was if they dealt with Picard’s torture in the subsequent episode…have him wake up in the middle of the night sweating on the floor or something. Even with the Borg, these important life changing moments seemed cured the next week. I know in the Trek universe several weeks may have passed but don’t let that happen, deal with the raw results of that kind of torture next week. And maybe later in the season too. And having said all of that, I love both episodes…Any way that’s my two cents.
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Matt
Mon, Dec 5, 2016, 10:30am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S3: Past Tense, Part II

I posted this in the comments for Past Tense Part 1, but I suppose it makes more sense here:

With how frequently the actors racked their shotguns to emphasize whatever it was they were saying at the moment, I'm wondering how they had any ammo left in their magazines. Maybe that's why Vin was so antagonistic the whole time. He realized that he was no longer in any real danger because B.C. and Sisko had completely unloaded their shotguns through unnecessary dramatic flourishes.

Actually, watching the episode in that light makes Vin a very interesting character. He knew he wasn't in any danger but went along with the whole thing anyway, antagonizing the hostage takers to see if they were genuine in their motives or just opportunists. He's worked in the sanctuary for who knows how long. He knows the plight of the residents and it eats away at the very fiber of his being him daily as he puts on the uniform. But he's just one cog in the machine, he has no real power. Then along comes the opportunity for real change via the Bell Riots. Finally, his chance to really stick it to the system! But it was started by a ghost who simply wants money and a trip to Tasmania. That's not going to generate any sympathy from the outside world. His dreams of shutting down the sanctuaries all but crushed, along comes Sisko, Bashir, and Webb preaching the very thing he hopes for. But he has to test them to see if they actually mean it. It's important that they are genuine if there is any hope for the outside world to gain the political will to take positive action. Thankfully, B.C. and Sisko love to argue and rack their shotguns unnecessarily! They've run them dry through their grandiose prose! Finally, Vin can antagonize them in just the right ways to prove they mean what they say without there being any real danger of any hostages being shot. He'd never risk that, he couldn't have that on his conscience.

That's also why he was so mad during the raid. He knew he wasn't in any danger, but the government's response actually put the hostages in danger. After the raid he is completely shocked by the aftermath of the government's "pacification" of the sanctuary. He knew the government had reached depraved lows, but he had no idea just how far it would go. Killing innocents and leaving orphans to hopelessly call out "mama." His disgust of the government fully cemented, he will go on to lead the watershed change in how society deals with the less fortunate. At the end, when Sisko asks him to report what he saw honestly, he replied "I was going to do that anyway." Indeed he would have. Truly, Vin was the unsung hero of the episode, his bravery bolstered in his knowledge that the shotguns were empty.
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Matt
Mon, Dec 5, 2016, 10:29am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S3: Past Tense, Part I

With how frequently the actors racked their shotguns to emphasize whatever it was they were saying at the moment, I'm wondering how they had any ammo left in their magazines. Maybe that's why Vin was so antagonistic the whole time. He realized that he was no longer in any real danger because B.C. and Sisko had completely unloaded their shotguns through unnecessary dramatic flourishes.

Actually, watching the episode in that light makes Vin a very interesting character. He knew he wasn't in any danger but went along with the whole thing anyway, antagonizing the hostage takers to see if they were genuine in their motives or just opportunists. He's worked in the sanctuary for who knows how long. He knows the plight of the residents and it eats away at the very fiber of his being him daily as he puts on the uniform. But he's just one cog in the machine, he has no real power. Then along comes the opportunity for real change via the Bell Riots. Finally, his chance to really stick it to the system! But it was started by a ghost who simply wants money and a trip to Tasmania. That's not going to generate any sympathy from the outside world. His dreams of shutting down the sanctuaries all but crushed, along comes Sisko, Bashir, and Webb preaching the very thing he hopes for. But he has to test them to see if they actually mean it. It's important that they are genuine if there is any hope for the outside world to gain the political will to take positive action. Thankfully, B.C. and Sisko love to argue and rack their shotguns unnecessarily! They've run them dry through their grandiose prose! Finally, Vin can antagonize them in just the right ways to prove they mean what they say without there being any real danger of any hostages being shot. He'd never risk that, he couldn't have that on his conscience.

That's also why he was so mad during the raid. He knew he wasn't in any danger, but the government's response actually put the hostages in danger. After the raid he is completely shocked by the aftermath of the government's "pacification" of the sanctuary. He knew the government had reached depraved lows, but he had no idea just how far it would go. Killing innocents and leaving orphans to hopelessly call out "mama." His disgust of the government fully cemented, he will go on to lead the watershed change in how society deals with the less fortunate. At the end, when Sisko asks him to report what he saw honestly, he replied "I was going to do that anyway." Indeed he would have. Truly, Vin was the unsung hero of the episode, his bravery bolstered in his knowledge that the shotguns were empty.
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Yanks
Mon, Dec 5, 2016, 8:45am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S2: Innocence

@ Brett
Tue, May 24, 2016, 6:08pm (UTC -6)
Reverse aging just doesn't work. How do you give birth to an old person?
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I never got the impression that they are born "old". I think they are born like any other species, they just regress at some older age. I wish we could have known at what age this begins.
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Yanks
Mon, Dec 5, 2016, 8:25am (UTC -6)
Re: Star Trek: Discovery

Hey - Fuller's out. I think I'd rather have this that his effort beeing tugged from two directions. It is a little more than interesting that he chose another series over Star Trek though.

Break... I saw 'Arrival' this weekend with my son. I enjoyed it immensley. If I were to critique it, I would say it was pretty slow at spots, but that's OK. Great story and well executed visuals. No "pew-pew" needed. I ended up feeling like Sisko discussing linear and non-linear time with my son :-)

If real SCI-FI is your thing, then I highly recommend it.
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johng
Mon, Dec 5, 2016, 7:52am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S5: Business as Usual

I think some posters are missing the distinction between war and genocide.

Selling weapons for war is much more morally ambiguous than selling a virus that will be used to kill 28 million men, women and children.

An arms dealer could at least rationalize that his conventional weapons will be used mainly in combat as opposed to against civilians. He might even convince himself that if he helps balance out the military power between the 2 sides, a peace agreement might come more quickly.

Also, weapons are used for legitimate defense about as often as for aggression and can also be used to fight genocidal tyrants, as in the case of the Bajorans.

Genocide, on the other hand, is unambiguously and horribly evil.

Quark was willing to lay down his own life to save the lives of 28 million strangers, so I don't think he got off that easy.

As for the cost of the cargo bay, I think that was just Sisko's way of getting a pound of flesh from Quark for selling arms on DS9 in the first place. It seemed reasonable to me.
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Del_Duio
Mon, Dec 5, 2016, 7:19am (UTC -6)
Re: Star Trek: Discovery

Then they better hop to it with the casting unless they're going the "Remember Me" route where only 3 people pilot a starship around the Alpha Quadrant :D
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Tanner
Mon, Dec 5, 2016, 5:52am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S4: The Visitor

Very similar to "A'' Good Things", with the older version of the crew back on the Defiant/Enterprise in the future.
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Smith
Mon, Dec 5, 2016, 4:58am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: The First Duty

That was Nova squadron's punishment right out of the gate.....doors that don't automatically open....
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eastwest101
Mon, Dec 5, 2016, 4:27am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: The City on the Edge of Forever

Gotta agree with you there Skeptical, despite all the nit picking I personally loved this episode, and I haven't been a huge fan of TOS until this. The whole thing just worked, from the wonderful interplay between the characters of Spock and Kirk, and the magnetic performance of Joan Collins . The entire episode is so simple and "human' with wonderful tones of romance, humour and a slow building of tragedy that is resolved in a totally unexpected yet somehow humanly tragic way that says something about the absurdity and senselessness of mortality.

One of the few Eps of TOS that still stands up watching today and will continue to do so. Haven't seen them all yet but am not surprised that other fans rate this as one of the high water marks of TOS and you can honestly say that this episode is a very strong piece of TV considering it was made in 1967
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David
Mon, Dec 5, 2016, 2:59am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: The First Duty

"I like how the doors of the Academy dorm rooms have knobs as well. Refreshing to see them have to get off their butt to answer the door." - that's one thing that ruined the scene for me. Why would they have doors that look exactly like 20th century ones, 400 years from now?! Do we have anything today that looks the same as it did in the 1600s? I don't have a problem with doors that don't automatically open (which by the way, aren't futuristic - we have these doors today), but the handle and latch looked too old fashioned.
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Tanner
Mon, Dec 5, 2016, 1:43am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S4: The Way of the Warrior

Why can't Bashir develop a scan for changelings? HE has one living on the station..analyse. The line that a changeling in the form of a rock will scan as a rock makes no sense, as it should not be able to change it's mass or molecular makeup, not to mention that even in the rock form it still has concioussness, as it can then change into something else.

I still don't get the two different uniforms thing.

Worf's line that he will need time to get used to a red uniform makes no sense, as he wore a red uniform in S1 TNG then switched in S2. I assume he began his Starfleet career with a red command uniform.

The Klingons could have avoided the whole problem withe Federation by flying straight to Cardassia.
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Smith
Sun, Dec 4, 2016, 10:34pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S7: The Pegasus

Thanks, Chrome.

I'm still not sure if the trade off was worth it - Suffering through 2 hours of a boring, non-sensical script that was an insult to all things TNG just to gain technology already commonplace?

Hell, Janeway already brought them back transphasic torpedoes and armor hull plating before Nemesis even occurred, so that should have been the bigger breakthrough.

Who cares about cloaking with you have an armor hull that no current species in the alpha quadrant can shoot through (except maybe the Sheliak).

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SamL
Sun, Dec 4, 2016, 5:44pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S5: Timeless

The only thing I liked about this episode was seeing Janeway's frozen corpse. Serves her right - getting killed on account of the same propulsion technology she acquired from an alien race that was assimilated/destroyed by the Borg because of her selfish desire to get her crew home.
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Tanner
Sun, Dec 4, 2016, 4:43pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S4: The Way of the Warrior

Why can't Bashir develop a scan for changelings? HE has one living on the station..analyse. The line that a changeling in the form of a rock will scan as a rock makes no sense, as it should not be able to change it's mass or molecular makeup, not to mention that even in the rock form it still has concioussness, as it can then change into something else.

I still don't get the two different uniforms thing.

Worf's line that he will need time to get used to a red uniform makes no sense, as he wore a red uniform in S1 TNG then switched in S2. I assume he began his Starfleet career with a red command uniform.

The Klingons could have avoided the whole problem withe Federation by flying straight to Cardassia.
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dave johnson
Sun, Dec 4, 2016, 2:39pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S7: The Dogs of War

What a lot of discussion here, amazing political debate, and so forth. HOWEVER,

let's get real..

The most important part of this episode is...

How the hell did Rom accumulate 5000 bars between getting married and buying the bar!!!! That is one story I want to know!
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grumpy_otter
Sun, Dec 4, 2016, 2:00pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S1: Encounter at Farpoint

@Grumpy -- "Almost 30 years after the fact, I'm beginning to wonder... how did the saucer section make it to Deneb IV without warp drive??"

I just re-watched this today, and that is the first time this occurred to me. The saucer section would have to have its own warp drive! I suppose it could, but as far as I know, we only ever see one warp core. Can't believe I never thought of that before!

I remember back when this came out I couldn't get it on my TV for some reason, so I begged the few friends I knew with VCRs to tape it--but I didn't have a VCR until about 2 years later so I was way behind on watching, lol.

I love this--a terrific start to the series, and showed them exactly what they needed to iron out, as others have noted above. I think the slow saucer separation and wide shots of the bridge are great--Star Trek hadn't been on TV in any form for a long time, so there was a bit of fan-service to show what this new Enterprise was like and what it could do.

I also love the space jellyfish--I think the idea of a sapient creature being used as a space station is original and amazing, and I loved when the two jellies went off together into space. I wish we'd me them again. They were interesting and said "thank you" for the rescue.
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Matsu
Sun, Dec 4, 2016, 1:44pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S4: Qpid

Now I'm officially stopping reading your ridiculous reviews.. this episode is one of my favorites, absolutely hilarious.. Q is always the best. I don't understand how anyone cannot like this episode. Now to erase this site from my bookmarks...
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Maniac
Sun, Dec 4, 2016, 12:06pm (UTC -6)
Re: BSG S3: The Passage

"Good character work and solid performances redeem a less-than-stellar storyline." - this sums up the episode the best. Kat's deathbed talks, paper shortage and that little smile when Adama spots Tigh acting like a stressed out teenager on his way to a first job interview make the episode. In short - the character moments carry the forgettable story - 3 stars from me.
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SteveRage
Sun, Dec 4, 2016, 9:56am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S3: Requiem for Methuselah

I've followed Jammer's reviews for YEARS, and I mean years - since he first started reviewing Trek. And on the whole I agree with a lot of his opinions. But man..... I think some of his TOS reviews are wildly off the mark - especially with Season 3. Many of his low scoring episodes I've really enjoyed and several of his higher scored episodes I've thought were awful..... including this one.

The premise of Flint was a fascinating concept, this lonely man who had been so many pivotal figures in human history..... but it was totally undone by the incredibly out-of-character behaviour of Kirk.

I do not buy for one second that our heroic captain, with the lives of all his crew on the line, would suddenly risk everything because he's decided he's in love with a woman he's met for an hour..... It is so wildly out of character it completely ruins the episode. Spock is chastising him throughout the entire episode - I expected him at one point to yell "Jim, you are acting incredibly unprofessionally - unbecoming of a starship captain".

And the less said about "Stay out of it Spock, we're fighting over a woman" the better. Can you imagine any military, political or civil leader uttering those words ever.

And then at the end, Spock removes Kirk's memories without permission!!!!!!! That is a serious violation or assualt, and again completely out of character for Spock.

What had the potential to be a 3 or 4 star episode is reduced down to a 1 star for the awful, awful characterisation.
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MR P R ALLEN
Sun, Dec 4, 2016, 8:40am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S2: The Thaw

Also love episodes where the doc is used in unusual ways. His intro in this episode is superb, as is his easy going confidence during that part.
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Paul Allen
Sun, Dec 4, 2016, 8:39am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S2: The Thaw

Fun episode, very TOS, in a good way.

Agree with Diamond Dave when he said:-

"CLOWN: I'm afraid."
"JANEWAY: I know."
(fade to black)
it's perfect. The final "drat" throws the whole thing out the window for me."

Although I' still give it 2.5 to 3 stars.
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