Comment Stream

Search and bookmark options Close
Search for:
Search by:

Total Found: 37,609 (Showing 1-25)

Next ►Page 1 of 1,505
Set Bookmark
Jason R.
Thu, Feb 23, 2017, 5:29pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: A Matter of Time

It occurred to me that having a full telepath like Lwaxana on board would have been equally useless. Her entire power set consisted of knowing who wanted to have sex with her and how - that was the full extent of her telepathic ability. Don't get me wrong - uncovering Picard's hidden lust was at least as impressive a feat as anything Tam did in Tin Man. Just slightly limited in its overall practical application to shipboard operations.
Set Bookmark
Paul Allen
Thu, Feb 23, 2017, 3:58pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S7: Chrysalis

Jesus Christ, that singing episode was utterly cringeworthy, the people in the next room were wondering what in the hell I was watching.
Set Bookmark
Tara
Thu, Feb 23, 2017, 3:57pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: A Matter of Time

Another fun Troi game is to count up how many episodes she's enjoyable as a character. "Hollow Pursuits" is the only one that comes to mind.

And then subtract a half-point for every episode in which her only contributions are stupid-obvious: "I feel pain!" "I sense dishonesty," "Commander Riker's memories are now erotic" , etc.

Subtract a full point for every episode in which she stars as an annoying emoto-chick: this includes at least three boyfriend-centered episodes and the "I lost my powers, woe is me" episode and the Ferengi kidnapping episode. And didn't she also get violated by the mind-rapist alien?

Minus ten points for teaching us how to massage, tongue, and caress a bowl of chocolate ice cream in "The Game".

What's hilarious is that the only times Troi is bearable is when she's possessed by an alien or forced to pretend she is one. If she had any insight into her own wasted life (and if she had the requisite courage), she should have moved to Romulus permanently as a Tal Shiar mole. It would have helped her grow as a person.
Set Bookmark
dlpb
Thu, Feb 23, 2017, 3:49pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: A Matter of Time

Explorers* heh.
Set Bookmark
DLPB
Thu, Feb 23, 2017, 3:48pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: A Matter of Time

It was bad enough already, but when her powers would have come in useful but interfered with the story the writers wanted to tell, she was either not on the bridge, or some sort of issue stopped her telepathy. So they just cheated whenever necessary. Blatantly. They really shouldn't have bothered adding her character at all.

And you're right on Worf. His advice was always ignored, and often stupidly. "Captain, going into this nebula is extremely dangerous for little gain. " "We are explorer's Mr Worf. Shut it."
Set Bookmark
Paul Allen
Thu, Feb 23, 2017, 3:40pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S7: Take Me Out to the Holosuite

That episode was exactly what I needed after a day from hell. :)
Set Bookmark
Rahul
Thu, Feb 23, 2017, 3:20pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: Mirror, Mirror

One of the more memorable episodes for me as we got to see some real acting from Sulu, Uhura, Scotty, Chekov. Spock with a goatee was decades ahead of its time and is an iconic look. It's a really fun episode with plenty going on, some unexpected turns and twists. But I also feel the episode is a tad over-rated.
It is hard to just overlook some of the things like a transporter malfunction connecting to a parallel universe and how the 4 get swapped (and their uniforms change) etc. It's a lot of hand-waving, but it does make for a good story. The fight scene with Spock against the 4 looked bad given Spock's stunt double had curly hair (watch closely). Looked as bad as the Kirk/Khan fight scene in "Space Seed" with the 2 completely different stunt doubles.
But this episode is really about the characters coming to life in their own special ways in the parallel universe. Sulu and Spock are terrific in this regard.
Kirk using his "I submit...illogical" speech at the end to Spock injects a bit of a morale to the story which is usually part of the course. Brutal empires on Earth have however lasted long enough unfortunately in some cases.
For me, this is 3.5/4 stars - an entertaining hour especially if you don't get hung up on details.
Set Bookmark
Chrome
Thu, Feb 23, 2017, 2:03pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: A Matter of Time

It might be a fun experiment to see just which episodes Troi is helpful in, and then count how many of those episodes Troi's advice was straight up ignored by the senior staff. I'm wagering she's right up there with Worf in the latter regard.
Set Bookmark
Chrome
Thu, Feb 23, 2017, 1:57pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: A Matter of Time

@Jason R.

Of course the writers very often use Troi to underline an obvious story point like "He seems very sure of himself" or other nonsense. But, there are the occasional gems like "A Matter of Perspective", "Face of the Enemy", "Samaritan Snare", "Where Silence Has Lease", "The Price" and heck even "The Best of Both Worlds" to some extent.

I'm no writer, but I think it might be difficult to write about the difficulties of meeting an unknown person if you already have a character who can immediately tell you what the deal is with the unknown. I'm sure that's why Troi is only *half-Betazoid* to begin with. Just look at how crazy the episodes get when Luxanna starts narrating every little thought people have.
Set Bookmark
Jason R.
Thu, Feb 23, 2017, 12:08pm (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S5: A Matter of Time

Chrome all Troi knew about him (that she stated) was that she didn't trust him. Well Duh. She doesn't trust the obvious flim flam man? Well I'll at least give her credit - that was greater insight than she had for Ardra, the woman claiming to be *the devil* in Devil's Due.

As always, her empathic abilities were utterly useless at divining anything but the most obvious points. Outside of, say, Skin of Evil and maybe one or two episodes, did Troi's empathic powers accomplish the slightest thing in 7 seasons?

Can you imagine if the writers had actually talen Troi's abilities seriously?
Set Bookmark
Yanks
Thu, Feb 23, 2017, 11:28am (UTC -6)
Re: Interstellar

Z: "When I watched it with my dad, he liked all of it except for the bootstrap paradox of Cooper manipulating his own timestream bit which he didn't understand. I told him, "Wibbly wobbly, timey wimey. Just go with it.""

Me too.

I really do need to watch this again... I'm sure I can answer some of my own questions.... having only seen it once .... well, there's a lot to digest.

Thanks for explaining some of that stuff Quincy.

I remember having a big problem with "Plan A" and Plan B", but it's been so long I can't remember what the problem was :-) Maybe I should fly through a wormhole and use a tesseract to communicate with myself ... lol
Set Bookmark
Peter G.
Thu, Feb 23, 2017, 9:52am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S3: The Offspring

@ philosopher-animal,

I think it's meant to be factually true that Data doesn't experience emotions; it's not just a whitewash of real emotions he does feel but aren't identical to the human ones. I think a tendency in episodes like "The Most Toys" to attribute Data's actions to an emotional desire for revenge is ironic, because a lot of the appeal of Data is in the fact that he's written in such a way that we can project our feelings onto him, and since he's not exuding any feelings our projection is never contradicted. He can be a placeholder for us, in a sense, which is very interesting. But on the other hand this doesn't mean that emotions we may instinctively attribute to him (by imagining ourselves in his position) are actually felt by him.

I agree that the crux of "The Offspring" is in Crusher's implication that Data does love Lal, but the reason this is crucial isn't because he actually does experience emotions; it's because real love isn't an emotion but rather a choice and an action. Acting lovingly IS love, rather than merely being a sign of it. The 'loving' emotions can feel very important and even overwhelming to a human, but it is the desire for the good of another that is the hallmark of love, and in that Data certainly does love Lal as well as anyone could love someone else. That's one of the reasons I find the episode so touching - that someone even bereft of all the rewards that normally stimulate our behavior (positive feedback mechanisms like endorphin release and hormones) can still live out a loving relationship, and in Data's case maybe even better than we can since he additionally lacks fear and selfishness. By the end I feel more sorry for him that he can't grieve for Lal than even the fact that he lost her.
Set Bookmark
Peter G.
Thu, Feb 23, 2017, 9:38am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S1: The Return of the Archons

This morning I watched the first half of the episode for the first time in many years. I was struck by a few things I never noticed before. For one thing, the manner of calling the citizens members of "the body" is an automatic Christianity reference, implying "body of Christ", which is a term for the Church. Looking at the episode from memory I remembered thinking it was about communism as Jammer suggested, but watching it again made it clear that it was meant to be a Christian community. The tone of the citizens support the idea that they are supposed to be Christians, on account of the apparent mindless glee on their faces, the 'vacant minds', the friendliness (at first glance), and the absolute requirement to take in strangers and put them up for the night. This strikes me as exactly the way someone critical of some aspects of Christianity would view a Christian community, and especially so for the fact that everyone was brainwashed by a central authority.

To hammer in the point that this is about Christians (and how new members are 'absorbed' rather than killed if possible) we have the "red hour", which seems to me clearly to imply the pandemonium and violence associated with communism. In Russia, for instance, communism was ostensibly a response to a very Christian society, where all of the old values were turned on their head through force and mayhem. Within the context of the literal details in the episode Festival serves to vent the frustrated energies of the people, while on the interpretive side it seems to imply that when you enforce an unnaturally perfect behavior code on people it will result in extreme blowback, which on a cultural level can lead to very bad results like communism.

A side note I'll make about this episode is that it seems to almost serve as a counter-argument against the future of humanity as depicted in the later TNG series. In TNG we're told that humanity has evolved beyond the point of aggression and violence, and that the people on Earth are peaceful and resolve all differences intellectually. But for those who are TOS fans we know that in Kirk's time there was plenty of 'red blooded' heartiness among the Starfleet officers we see, including lust, aggression, sometimes the desire for vengeance, and so forth. And as humane as Kirk's approach typically was to resolving conflicts, one thing we cannot realistically say is that the methods on TOS were universally non-violent. "Errand of Mercy" is a good showcase for that. The events of "Return of the Archons" seem to suggest that mankind naturally has a kind of aggression and pent up energy (including sexual) which must be expressed in some way in order for people not to explode from time to time. In TNG we seem to be presented with a sort of sanitized society free from those visceral impulses, except maybe for Riker, who almost stands as a commentary on the docility of the other humans on the show. But here in TOS we're being shown that being docile or perfectly calm isn't the end-all in becoming an advanced culture. Rather, the key probably ought to be to integrate all of the darker impulses into a constructive way of life, rather than to pretend they're not there. Right or wrong, TOS seems to frequently argue for the Kirk way of life, which is passionate but logical, adventurous but humane. In Voyager Janeway basically refers to this crew as cowboys, and from the perspective of TOS it seems like the idea is being put forward that anything shy of having the gusto of cowboys is selling humanity short.
Set Bookmark
philosopher-animal
Thu, Feb 23, 2017, 9:19am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S3: The Offspring

This is one of my favourite episodes of fiction, period, though I don't claim it is one of the *best* such. Funny how that works. (It influenced my thinking and feeling in spite of some of the flaws discussed.)

As for Requiem for Methuselah, *exactly* the same point is raised, yes.

However, there's also a *minor* take-back. I am not sure why he held so, but my father (who used to catch some TNG with me as I grew up) thought that Beverly's line about not believing Data when he says he can't love her was the most important one of all. Data is *deluded*: in a way the whole point of the episode is that he *does* love, his protestations not withstanding. I agree with this interpretation, even though as I've learned, it is not intended in the scripts. Though there was apparently a draft of "Skin of Evil" where Data says "how empty it will *feel* without her presence" (emphasis mine - the closing scene with Data wondering about the loss of Tasha).

It is sort of an "emotional Turing Test" watching Data. He's reserved, but is he unemotional? How does one know? (See also "The Most Toys", for example.)
Set Bookmark
DLee
Thu, Feb 23, 2017, 4:30am (UTC -6)
Re: TNG S7: Gambit

Nice to still see Jammer's reviews available online. I read these when they were published on USENET (anyone know what that is?? hahaha)

While I've watched these 2 episodes a few times before, I had forgotten James Worthy had guest starred. Nice to see him in there. At 6'9" tall, he towered over Worf. I thought Worf was around 6'5'?? But he looked awfully small.

Overall, this was entertaining. I'd give it at least 3 stars.
Set Bookmark
NCC-1701-Z
Thu, Feb 23, 2017, 3:30am (UTC -6)
Re: Interstellar

Wow, did not know Kip helped out on Contact too! That's news to me!

Glad to have one scientist out there bringing his work to the masses!
Set Bookmark
NCC-1701-Z
Thu, Feb 23, 2017, 3:27am (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S2: The Jem'Hadar

Seeing the Odyssey get blown up must have been really terrifying to watch when this ep first aired back in the day, basically making the statement "If that had been Picard instead of Keogh, and the Enterprise-D instead of Odyssey, the ship still would have been lost with all hands" and establishing the Jem'Hadar as a credible threat without having to explicitly say much. Showing, not telling.

Yeah, that was definitely a well-done starship destruction scene. If it had to be done, do it like that. Star Trek Discovery, take note.
Set Bookmark
Caedus
Thu, Feb 23, 2017, 3:22am (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S5: Latent Image

Loved it one of Voyager's best and I hear Picardo's favorite ep as well.
Set Bookmark
Trek fan
Thu, Feb 23, 2017, 2:25am (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S3: Elaan of Troyius

Good, solid, fun TOS episode. The plot overreaches perhaps just a bit, short-changing the developing sparks between Elaan and Kirk in favor of a neat Klingon battle that is drawn out a little too long. But I would give this one a solid 3/4 stars, if not 3 1/2 stars, because of the amusing battle of wills between the ever-diplomatic Kirk and the charismatic Elaan.

France Nuyen, the Vietnamese-French actress from several Hollywood classics, makes a strong impression here as the first Asian woman to play the main guest role on a Trek episode. There's an undeniable energy to her performance that sustains interest in the somewhat placid pacing of the episode. All of the regular actors, from Shatner down to Majel Barrett, feel very comfortable in this one -- nicely underplaying their parts with an easy chemistry that has really matured by this point in Season 3.

I enjoy both parts of the episode, namely the diplomatic crisis half (primarily centering around Elaan's friction with everyone on board) and the tactically driven (TOS is a throwback to the days when Trek space fights involved actual strategy rather than technobabble pyrotechnics) Klingon battle half, which tie together through the espionage plot. The A/B plot with a connecting link here actually foreshadows the way DS9 and other later Trek shows would often script their episodes. My only complaint is that, in this case, the drawn-out Klingon battle unfortunately pulls our attention away from Elaan's character a bit sharply -- it's much more jarring here than in the shorter battle sequence and spy plot that interrupts the diplomatic mission/interpersonal crisis in "Journey to Babel." And as fun as it is to see the Enterprise in a strategic dogfight with a Klingon warship, it's not as compelling as the Elaan-Kirk dynamic that it pushes to the background. But that's a small gripe in an otherwise engaging episode of Star Trek.
Set Bookmark
Vii
Wed, Feb 22, 2017, 11:36pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S2: The Jem'Hadar

In regards to the comments towards Sisko's somewhat hotheaded decision to pull a phaser and confront the Vorta, rather than hatching an ingenious plan to feed the spy false information - I think it's worth bearing in mind that he had just watched the Odyssey blow up right in his face, and he knew that that ship and its entire crew had basically given their lives to rescue him, a mission which he'd just found out was basically unnecessary as he had meant to be set free all along. He was furious and obviously very upset, as was the entire rescue team who watched the suicide run, so his first reaction was probably to just go in, all guns blazing. In Spock's words, he was 'emotionally compromised' so didn't have the leisure of forming intricate plans to ensnare the spy. I thought Kira delivered an amazing performance in the scene where she and Julian watch the Odyssey explode, you can see the raw horror in her face and her eyes brimming with shocked tears.

That being said, it was pretty gut wrenching having to watch a Galaxy-class starship being destroyed just like that. Point taken, but lawd that was painful. Also I have to agree with some of the former comments here - I liked Keogh too, wish he hadn't died. It would have been nice to see some more of him.

All told this is an episode I enjoy rewatching, but mainly for the denouement scene and the destruction of the doomed Odyssey. The irony of the ship's name is not lost on me..
Set Bookmark
Grumpy
Wed, Feb 22, 2017, 10:17pm (UTC -6)
Re: Interstellar

Z: "(thanks, Kip Thorne and Caltech!)"

For the record, Kip Thorne is also acknowledged in Contact (the original novel) for conceiving of the wormhole transportation network.
Set Bookmark
Quincy
Wed, Feb 22, 2017, 9:16pm (UTC -6)
Re: VOY S7: Workforce

As I recall, Jaffkin only said he didn't have a father. Why would that automatically mean they can't reproduce the same way as every other race? It could easily be a cultural or political circumstance. Maybe his race has a bunch of single moms with test tube babies. Maybe he was birthed in a creche with nannies and not parents. Considering how hostile certain groups have been toward the nuclear family in the Western world, I can easily see some hypothetical political body decreeing that henceforth all babies will be spawned instead of born.
Set Bookmark
NCC-1701-Z
Wed, Feb 22, 2017, 8:47pm (UTC -6)
Re: Interstellar

Just re-watched this; have to agree with every word of this review. This movie blows Contact out of the water on a giant wave as far as I'm concerned. I also appreciate that this movie is based on real science most of the time (thanks, Kip Thorne and Caltech!) and stays as realistic as possible in that regard, especially the black hole and wormhole moving away from traditional depictions of such as a funnel in space. Some of the visuals - the giant waves, the black hole, the docking scene - man it just blows me away every time I rewatch!

Soundtrack deserves special mention here - Hans Zimmer blows it away again. Especially during the giant wave scene - that scene was my favorite of the entire movie thanks in part to just the soundtrack!!

When I watched it with my dad, he liked all of it except for the bootstrap paradox of Cooper manipulating his own timestream bit which he didn't understand. I told him, "Wibbly wobbly, timey wimey. Just go with it."
Set Bookmark
Paul Allen
Wed, Feb 22, 2017, 5:12pm (UTC -6)
Re: DS9 S7: Afterimage

Ezri is a terrible character.

She's a young adult, who gets on like an absolute child. The hell is she doing as a lieutenant, and a counsellor on a station??
Set Bookmark
Rahul
Wed, Feb 22, 2017, 4:26pm (UTC -6)
Re: TOS S2: The Changeling

Another mediocre episode for me after "Who Mourns for Adonais?". Just a lot of silliness with Scotty being killed then brought back to life, part of Uhura's memory being wiped out and her learning to read basic English again, Spock mind-melding with a computer...
The premise of an old Earth probe being damaged and turned into an ultra-powerful killing machine that adopts Kirk as its creator is interesting. As Nomad starts to piece together its next move (killing off the crew and heading for Earth while starting to disobey Kirk) works, however the story is slow paced, it does drag as if it was a struggle to fill the full hour.
I do agree with many of the comments already made that of all the instances where Kirk convinces a computer to destroy itself, this one's probably the most well done.
This one rates 2/4 stars for me. Very much a true science fiction story which has its silly quirks.
Next ►Page 1 of 1,505
▲Top of Page | Menu | Copyright © 1994-2017 Jamahl Epsicokhan. All rights reserved. Unauthorized duplication or distribution of any content is prohibited. This site is an independent publication and is not affiliated with or authorized by any entity or company referenced herein. See site policies.