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Robert - Mon, Apr 27, 2015, 7:29am (USA Central)
Re: DS9 S6: Tears of the Prophets

"The prophets made the Jem'Hadar disappear. I don't think they are somewhere waiting for permission to come through, they are GONE."

In Star Trek Online they actually do pop out eventually and you have to deal with them years after the fact, like Akorem.
John Logan - Mon, Apr 27, 2015, 7:27am (USA Central)
Re: TNG S3: Who Watches the Watchers

@Picard from USS Phoenix: That is a simply unfactual remark. The first universities were started by the Catholic Church in the eleventh century. The new world was discovered by a Catholic. Ancient writings from, Josephus to Tacitus were preserved by the church, and many church fathers studied Aristotle. Even most of the first hospitals were founded by the Catholic Church. Look at Albertus Magnus, Augustin-Louis Cauchy, Pierre Duhem, Jean-Baptiste Dumas, Roger Boscovich, Blaise Pascal, André-Marie Ampère, Gregor Mendel, Charles-Augustin de Coulomb, Pierre de Fermat, Antoine Laurent Lavoisier, Marin Mersenne, Alessandro Volta, Amedeo Avogadro, John Desmond Bernal and Henri Becquerel. The current wars in the Ukraine, and World Wars I and II, as well as the Cold War show that secularism did not cause violence to go away.
Robert - Mon, Apr 27, 2015, 7:24am (USA Central)
Re: VOY S5: Once Upon a Time

Captain Janeway synched her Steam account with the VOY holodeck before they left spacedock.
MsV - Mon, Apr 27, 2015, 4:43am (USA Central)
Re: DS9 S2: The Circle

@ Elliot worst line of the episode is Sisko's “As I understand it, [Li], you report directly to the Prophets, but from time to time I may ask for your help.”

I seriously agree with you.
@Yanks Iron Mike Kira. I like the new name. Still laughing

I love this trilogy but I hat Kai Winn and my opinion of her never changed throughout the seven years.

My oldest son gave Bariel a new name too. "Dried Biscuit"
Azdude - Mon, Apr 27, 2015, 12:47am (USA Central)
Re: ENT S4: The Aenar

Jammer-

This is the first episode that I disagree with you on. I do feel you got a bit too cerebral on this one, a bit too analytical.

I really enjoyed this episode. if I use this kind of analysis when I sat down to eat I probably never would eat. Thinking about where food came from, the processing, the poor animals that gave up their lives for my meal; well it just be too much.
Sometimes, simply put, a good steak is a good steak. Just enjoy.
Norvo - Sun, Apr 26, 2015, 11:41pm (USA Central)
Re: DS9 S6: The Reckoning

"Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the gateway to the temple... Deep Space Nine?"

... Well, don't mind if I do, Dax. That line always felt like cheating on the writers' part, a way of adding artificial tension and drama to the story. Throughout the series, the (mouth of) the wormhole is considered the gateway to the Celestial Temple, not the man made space station that was moved towards it.

For example, revisit "The Assignment" in which the Pah'Wraith possessed Keiko flew a runabout to the mouth of the wormhole in preparation of killing the Prophets. Or season 3's "Destiny" where another Bajoran prophecy claimed three vipers would "burn the temple gates", and that turned out to be three comet fragments that passed through the wormhole.

But, like Bashir said in The Reckoning: "The ancient prophecies are a tangle of vague contradictions".
W Smith - Sun, Apr 26, 2015, 11:24pm (USA Central)
Re: ENT S2: Stigma

Better than the last few episodes, with a social commentary that is kind of the point of Trek, but in the end it's not nuanced enough, the Vulcan bashing is tiresome, and what the heck were they thinking with Travis and melons! But at least with the A story in this episode, the writers tried to tell a good, Trek story.
Xylar - Sun, Apr 26, 2015, 8:06pm (USA Central)
Re: VOY S5: Once Upon a Time

So, is no one wondering why Voyager even has that Flotter program in its holodeck base? Why would they have that? Voyager was only scheduled for a 3 week long mission with no children on board.
There would have been no reason for them to include that to the holodeck archives.

They couldn't have made it from scratch, because it has all the stories it's supposed to have on Earth and wherever else it exists, so where do they get them from? They can't pull up the stories from the database, because Voyager shouldn't have it in its database, because it doesn't need them. There were never supposed to be children on board.

These are the questions that haunt my mind. I know it's nitpicking and focusing on a detail that doesn't matter, but hey, that's how my mind twists stories that don't require me to pay much attention.
nothingoriginal 55 - Sun, Apr 26, 2015, 3:52pm (USA Central)
Re: TNG S6: Starship Mine

I have a few problems with this ep.
Troi never senses any hostile intent from anyone...would've been better had she not even be in the ep.
and, the ending was too light haerted. I know they didnt like him, but a starfleet commander was still killed in the line of duty...you'd think they'd talk about that instead of Picads frackin saddle.
Azdude - Sun, Apr 26, 2015, 1:17pm (USA Central)
Re: ENT S4: Daedalus

@Polt

I'm glad I'm not the only one that noticed this glaring lack of continuity.

ENT certainly isn't the shining star in the Star Trek universe, but the shows have been getting better, like a light bulb getting brighter before it burns out.

But, evidently, the powers that were didn't even watch their own shows.

A pity. I'm sure I'm not the only one going through Trek withdrawal. Thank goodnes for Amazon Prime, and the ability to catch up on shows I wasn't able to watch the first time around.
$G - Sun, Apr 26, 2015, 7:56am (USA Central)
Re: TNG S6: Suspicions

Sometimes there are mediocre or bad episodes I don't think are *too* bad, but I'll see commenters here stamp them with a zero or half-star rating and think those commenters are being over the top about it. This episode is probably my turn at being one of *those* commenters.

I can think of only one compliment to lob at this episode: that Klingon and, specifically, Ferengi scientists are shown. Even better, the Ferengi scientist isn't just a businessman or con man in disguise trying to make some profit on some stolen technology (actually, he *does* offer exclusive rights to its further study or some such, but that's fine by me considering it's still *his* research and he is genuinely passionate about it).

Other than that? Terrible all around. Dialogue, plotting, characterization. All worthless. Was Beverly's autopsy on the Ferengi so invasive? Couldn't it have been just a scan? How come the autopsy on Jo'Bril left him intact? Why did Picard or Riker seemingly not care about proving that a murder (or two) took place on the Enterprise? Why was Worf not being held back from getting involved in the investigation? It all just seemed so tired, so worn out, and a little bit depressing? Bad writing, or just late season fatigue on the part of the producers and actors?

Why is it *Beverly* who is interested in shield technology? Why not Data or Geordi? Probably because Geordi got his own put-my-career-on-the-line murder mystery plot a few weeks ago. Yeah, I think "Suspicions" is even worse than "Aquiel".

And then the killer crawls out of the shuttle furniture (in one of the most unintentionally hilarious scenes since Season 1) and spills his *whole* plan. All of it, everything. I covered my eyes when he boasted about stealing the technology to build "a weapon". I was stunned into silence when Beverly did some kung fu (which I guess makes sense since she's pretty athletic, I guess...?) shot a hole in his belly, and when he, like a zombie, lumbered towards her until she vaporized him completely.

Punctuating this is the most juvenile and pathetic use of Guinan on the show. None of her advice is something anyone else could have given her. None of it is even all that *good*. Why did she need the pretense of tennis elbow? I mean usually she comes up with some act to make a point, but in this episode it's more like a parody. I'm also reading that this is Guinan's last appearance on the show. Not that the producers could have known that, but what a ball dropped.

Oddly, even though I'm a huge Trek fan, I'd never seen this episode before last night. I probably will never watch it again. Zero stars for me. Probably one of the five or six worst entries of the series. At least most dreadful Season 1 outings had a kernel of an interesting premise buried somewhere. I know an episode is beyond saving when I pulled out the "at least" apologetics for Season 1.
jcar - Sun, Apr 26, 2015, 6:48am (USA Central)
Re: TNG S4: The Host

Omg - everybody's so intellectual and seemingly not viscerally disturbed by this episode as I was - I'm so grossed out by this episode in so many ways - it's kinda nauseatingly creepy how it starts off as an almost Aliens-like impregnation suspense theme, combined with the betrayal of Odan's self presentation to Crusher. So creepy.
Then, when they did find out that he was actually just a worm squirming inside a host and Beverly had essential fallen in love with this Trill thing, there was virtually zero reaction from any of the crew, least of all Dr. Beverly. I mean, sure when things went south after the shuttle incident they seemed a natural level of concerned, but after that it was as if nothing had phased her about her boyfriend being basically pregnant with the alien-worm (true) version of himself. Seriously!? Sure in the TNG universe everyone in Starfleet is super open minded and educated and generally unphased by strange beings or
bizarre phenomenon, well, mostly anyways, but I would've expected at least some base level reaction of mild disgust or turned-offness in some respect. i mean... Look at that thing!!
Yeah so, I agree about Riker's performance and the philosophical intrigue of pondering love in many forms, and even slightly agree with the comments about it being a good opportunity to "tackle" homophobia (although in a way they kind of did - it was probably pretty edgy for 1990's television - she did after all, sensually kiss Beverly's wrist and for a belief moment Dr. Crusher seemed quite taken...)
I also wondered where Riker's conciousness went. But overall it was just a weird and disturbing episode for me. The fact that everyone acted so normal was disturbing in itself. Plus, McFadden's character role often makes me laugh - a lot of the time when things are supposed to be serious, she just carries on with an almost childlike goofiness - it's fairly subtle but sometimes it's just that slightly vacant , off-in-la-la-land look in her eyes or that slight goofy smirk when shit's going down that provides a bit of comic relief when things get tense on the Enterprise. So it wasn't the most convincing portrayal of a heated romance from my POV either. It was amusingly disturbing. I'll give it that.
Pam - Sun, Apr 26, 2015, 5:22am (USA Central)
Re: TNG S2: The Schizoid Man

WHEN will Data learn to stop revealing the fact/location of his "shut-off" switch?? He can absorb vast quantities of information in seconds, but he can't figure this out?

I suppose his naivete is just part of what makes him human.
W Smith - Sat, Apr 25, 2015, 1:25pm (USA Central)
Re: ENT S2: Dawn

Another really pedestrian outing that had me looking at my watch quite a few times. It was utterly predictable not only plot-wise, but even the plot holes were predictable. Obviously Enterprise could have beamed down water, medical supplies, etc. but that would have "ruined" the storytelling by ending the episode without preordained drama.

I remember watching these mid-season 2 episodes in the first-run, and it's when I started skipping weeks if the previews looked trite and predictable. I gave up after another round of alien nazis, the Xindi, were introduced but I'll stick through the entire series this time to the end of season four for completeness since it doesn't look like we'll be getting another Trek television show again.
MsV - Sat, Apr 25, 2015, 1:04am (USA Central)
Re: DS9 S6: Tears of the Prophets

I just skipped a year of shows, but I'd like to say what bothered me was Admiral Ross. He had a lot of nerve giving Ben an ultimatum, at this point I would kiss the prophets' butts for getting rid of those Dominion ships in the wormhole. He should have been afraid to say no to them.

Ever since season 5 when that Julian changling messed with the wormhole to make sure it didn't collapse, well Sisko should have asked the prophets for help because the moment that Pahwraith went in the wormhole, they closed it permanently. (or at least until they wanted it opened). So much for not being able to collapse the wormhole.

Also, what makes Dukat think that the Pahwraiths can bring reinforcements from the Gamma Quadrant? The prophets made the Jem'Hadar disappear. I don't think they are somewhere waiting for permission to come through, they are GONE.

Other than being sorry Jadzia died, these are the only things about the episode that bothered me. Now back to the beginning of Season 5.
Azdude - Sat, Apr 25, 2015, 12:51am (USA Central)
Re: ENT S3: The Forgotten

I just realized, not everyone knows who Seth McFarlane is, he's the creator of "Family Guy". Funny seeing him on the show!
Azdude - Sat, Apr 25, 2015, 12:48am (USA Central)
Re: ENT S3: The Forgotten

I agree with Jammer, except I would give it four stars!

Not much to add, except did anyone else catch Seth McFarlane as the crewman who got chewed by Tripp, at 14.08?
Azdude - Fri, Apr 24, 2015, 8:01pm (USA Central)
Re: ENT S3: Hatchery

Wow, I must be really smart. Yep, the alien egg peed on the Captain and turned him into Mr. Mom. Wow, never saw that coming.

On a side note, I'm catching up on Star Treks I missed when I was in the Air Force for 22 years. TNG is ny favorite series, although I was stationed in England when it came out, and assumed it was a British produced show because of Picards accent. No Google back then to educate me.

Enterprise is dissapointing, to say the least, but it is satisfying my Trek cravings. I just lower my standards.

So many here like DS9. I never cared for it, but maybe I'm missing something. I'll revisit.

Anyway, I feel so much better getting these random musings off my chest.

Thanks Jammer!
Azdude - Fri, Apr 24, 2015, 7:04pm (USA Central)
Re: ENT S3: Hatchery

I just started watching this episode, only 10 minutes into it. Haven't read the comments yet, but Archer just got sprayed.

I've always wondered why, when there's a breathable atmosphere in a potentially hazardous situation, they upen their helmets.

I'd be the crewman that says "that's ok, I'll just keep mine on."

We'll see if I'm right. Resuming the episode. ..
St..Manfred - Fri, Apr 24, 2015, 4:23pm (USA Central)
Re: VOY S7: Seventh Season Recap

A good series. It is a lot easier to criticize than to praise it. I consider myself a huge Star Trek fan. When I say "Star Trek", I am speaking of the utopian future Gene Roddenberry envisioned, from the core of mankind improving the human condition itself to economics all the way to philosophical normative ideals. Whenever I watch a Star Trek show, I am expecting this premise to resonate through its fabric.

When I started out watching VOY, I did not expect any serialized soap drama we now find in almost every TV show (the incredibly manipulative, pseudo-level-of-suspense and pseudo-plot driven "Game of Thrones" being paramount here). I expected a show that (for the most part) conveys the serene, humbling and enlightened Roddenberry-vision even through its darker plots. I like the occasional character and relationship development, as well as progression of the Bigger Picture in Star Trek shows, but I never watch them for these. I am watching Star Trek to get positive-normative allegories on where mankind might end up in some distant future, when we finally will have been able to "kill the beast" within.

Bearing this in mind, I think VOY has delivered. And it's these unique characteristics that make Star Trek so outstanding among all these hip post-modern self-devouring TV-shows nowadays, which basically cuddle our vanities and fears of loss of ego and materialistic possessions.

3 Stars for Star Trek VOY from me. Now I am looking forward to watching Star Trek DS9 for the first time.
Grumpy - Fri, Apr 24, 2015, 11:03am (USA Central)
Re: TNG S5: Power Play

Peter: "[Ro] seems to embody everything Yar was supposed to have been but failed to become."

Never thought of it that way, surprisingly. Seems an obvious comparison, now that you mention it... yet I tend to disagree. Yar was supposed to be a competent department head, not a woman with something to prove, like Ro. While Yar took no guff from outsiders, she was fully loyal to the Starfleet agenda.
Brian - Fri, Apr 24, 2015, 10:53am (USA Central)
Re: ENT S1: Fortunate Son

Even with it's faults, I think Enterprise is the best of the Star Trek spin-offs -which I find amazing, considering Rick Berman was involved
Peter - Fri, Apr 24, 2015, 9:40am (USA Central)
Re: TNG S5: Power Play

This episode really clicked for me and was among the best of Season 5. I was impressed by Sirtis' acting. I think I like her better as a General Zod-like prisoner yearning to escape than as Troi. Spiner's acting was also superb (as usual). His hatred of Worf had me thinking the possessor really were from the Essex, because almost two centuries ago Klingons were THE enemy.

My one quibble was O'Brien's involvement in the first place. Why does he beam down with the gadget that will strengthen the transporter signal? Never mind that he is the father of a newborn taking a 50/50 chance (according to LaForge) of getting his atoms scattered everywhere -- can they not beam down a piece of equipment without a person holding it? That's just silly.

I'm also liking Ro more and more this season. She's intelligent, tough, and sexy (witness her seduction of Riker during "Conundrum"). Her character seems to embody everything Yar was supposed to have been but failed to become.

I also noticed the strong score in this episode. A good score always enhances the mood and action, while a bland or forgettable one detracts from it. Hard to believe a producer actually wanted weak music on this show. Glad he was overruled.
FutureDude - Fri, Apr 24, 2015, 6:40am (USA Central)
Re: Star Trek: The Motion Picture

Often maligned as “slow and boring”, in my opinion, this is actually the best Trek film.

The human adventure is just beginning

I’ve had the argument for years. Most people think Star Trek: The Motion Picture is plain boring. I recently saw it described as “the motionless picture” in a writer’s blog. It’s considered slow. Ponderous. Monochromatic. Humorless.

The conventional wisdom holds that the second movie, The Wrath of Khan, is not only the best Star Trek film, it is also one of the greatest sci-fi films of all time. But I have to admit that — while I really enjoyed Khan — ST: TMP is, by far, my favorite of the eleven Trek movies.

Before you roll your eyes, please let me explain. For me it all boils down to one unifying idea — Star Trek: The Motion Picture is on a very small list of modern films that depict a powerful, beautiful, and original view of the future. I may not change your mind, but I hope you can experience the film through my eyes.

December, 1979

Think about the time when it was made.

It was 1979. Star Wars and Close Encounters graced the screen two years earlier. Superman: The Movie made us believe that a man could fly in 1978 and The Empire Strikes Back was just around the corner in 1980. For anyone with an imagination, it was a tremendous time to be alive and the golden age for blockbuster sci-fi cinema. But none of the aforementioned films mattered to me as much as Star Trek.

As a wide-eyed, twelve-year-old seventh grader, I probably had built up more excitement and anticipation for The Motion Picture than any other event in my entire life. My childhood heroes — Kirk, Spock, and McCoy — were about to grace the big screen! What would the Enterprise look like? Would they change it? How would it look flying through space with modern visual effects? I was so excited to see what they would do with a big budget.

Once I started seeing the commercials, I went nuts. I remember the voice of Orson Wells: “It will alter your perception of the future by taking you there.” That was what I wanted to hear. The FUTURE. Finally, a film about the future!

Star Wars took place “a long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away.” What did that have to do with me? I felt like I was finally going to get what I wanted from a film: a real depiction of human potential hundreds of years in the future.

I had seen 2001: A Space Odyssey a few years earlier. It was the first honest tour of tomorrow that I had ever seen. It seemed very possible and right around the corner based upon what had been happening with NASA’s space program. Krypton in Superman was really, really cool. But again, that was an alien planet with magical technology. I wanted to see something that connected to Earth and, ultimately, to me.

Star Trek: The Motion Picture delivered exactly what I was looking for. While 2001 showed me the world that I expected to live in as an adult, Star Trek promised to reveal a future of my dreams.

Finally, It Arrives in Theatres

When I saw the film with my cousin James, we were mesmerized from the first moment. Seeing the camera do a 180-degree pan of the updated Klingon cruisers as they approached a huge blue luminescent cloud blew my mind. Once we were inside the ships, I was sucked in by the production design. Clear screens with data projected on them. Actual Klingon language graphics on screen — not English! Then we moved on to the Epsilon 9 space station with astronauts jetting around outside. I was blown away, and this was just the beginning.

After a quick and epic stop at Vulcan to visit a hippie version of Spock, I finally got to see what I had been waiting for: Earth in the future. You see, when I watched the original Star Trek as a child, I always wanted to see what Earth looked like in the 23rd Century.

Yes, it was cool to travel around the galaxy seeking out new life, but I wanted to know what it was like at home. It always felt like they avoided it due to budget or something. And, no; visits to Earth in the 1960’s didn’t count.

Earth in the 23rd Century

Now, here was Starfleet Headquarters in San Francisco. The Golden Gate Bridge covered by pneumatic travel tubes. Shuttles flitting across the sky as routinely as a buses travel the streets. We then move to an orbiting office complex bustling with traffic; followed by an extended drydock sequence that reveals the Enterprise in all of its futuristic glory.

Speaking of the Enterprise, Andrew Probert took Matt Jeffries’ original design and blew it out of the water. The clean lines and details make this still the best ship to ever grace a Star Trek film or TV series.

For the first time, we’re able to ascertain the actual size of the ship. As Admiral Kirk and Scotty circle in a travel pod, the front window is large enough to see them inside. This — when mixed with the floating astronauts and traffic — gives us a real sense of scale. It was like going to the airport, and watching the airplanes and ground crews. There is something magical about it.

The ultimate sequence was the launch of the Enterprise. A tiny astronaut waving goodbye. The sun rising as the ship cruises away. Seeing Earth dwindle in the viewscreen as Sulu takes them to impulse. Shooting past Jupiter and its moons was awe inspiring. All of these aspects felt like a love letter to us from the future. I felt like I was finally there.

The sets and costumes were amazing. Every aspect felt rich and fully realized. The visual effects were spectacular. Each time the Enterprise went into warp speed, I was left speechless. It was even more amazing than watching the Millenium Falcon jump into hyperspace.

The icing on the cake was the final reveal of who/what V’ger really was — an evolved NASA space probe that had returned home after a galaxy-spanning adventure. The fact that the core concept was about exploration and connected to Voyager — a real planetary mission at the time — was validating and inspiring.

The only complaint I had about the film was that the plot reminded me of the Original Series episode called “The Changeling” where the Nomad probe went through a similar conversion. But I could forgive this.

A Futuristic Work of Art

All in all, seeing Star Trek: The Motion Picture was the greatest experience I had ever had at the time. My cousin James and I were blown away when it was over. As this was not the time of instant mp3 downloads, we drove back from the theater singing the theme over and over in an attempt to remember it. We must have driven my Aunt Cecelia crazy.

The soundtrack by Jerry Goldsmith remains legendary to this day. Few sci-fi films have ever topped it. In fact, I was ecstatic when Gene Roddenberry chose to use the theme for The Next Generation in 1987. I still listen to it often.

Roddenberry wanted to tell this story. He was inspired by the future and wanted to share that vision with the world. He finally had the budget, and the team to do it right.

Director Robert Wise, the actors, and the production staff — which included effects wizards Douglas Trumball of 2001 and John Dykstra of Star Wars — crafted a beautiful journey to tomorrow. It moved at a thoughtful pace so that the audience could take everything in. There was art transpiring on the screen; it like a classic painting — you don’t just scan it for two seconds and walk away.

All I ask is that you revisit the film and give it another chance. This time, look around. Take it in. You might find that you like it a little more than you expect.
MsV - Fri, Apr 24, 2015, 1:53am (USA Central)
Re: DS9 S6: Sacrifice of Angels

I loved this arc, except Sons and Daughters. Just couldn't stand it. Of course Odo made me mad enough to eat nails, but I enjoyed the story anyway. I just hate the way Odo looks when he is linking, he has that same lethargic expression that babies have when they are kept in a swing too long and can't speak to say they want out. (I think they may be sick) I also wish they had kept Ziyal alive, maybe she could have bonded with Jake and Nog as a potential playmate. Either way I just LOVED this arc, I had not seen it in years. This time I am attempting to watch every show in this serial from beginning to end.

BTW I like the post about not using Q. real funny.
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