Jammer's Reviews

Comment Browser

Clear | RSS for this | Bottom

Total Found: 21,513 (Showing 1-25)

Next »Page 1 of 861
zzybaloobah - Mon, Sep 15, 2014, 3:43am (USA Central)
Re: DS9 S6: Behind the Lines

Did anyone else have problems with putting Dax in command? AFAIK, she's never held a command. Now she's in command of one of the Federation's most powerful warships, on a critical high-priority mission? You don't give missions like that to brand new captains.....

Loved the interplay between Rom, Kira, and Odo....
bhbor - Mon, Sep 15, 2014, 2:00am (USA Central)
Re: ENT S3: Harbinger

My first thought was maybe that Trip really sucked in bed (by Vulcan standards where Ponfar is a deep and engrossing multi-day ritual) and T'Pol uses the experiment excuse as some kind of Vulcany exit-card, ha
bhbor - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 9:59pm (USA Central)
Re: Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan

I'm starting to feel like "Master and Commander: Far Side of the World" belongs in this list as a kind of spiritual 'prequel' to the Star Trek franchise. I'm not sure if anyone else agrees, but I think that this movie is VERY Star Trek in nature: federation esque-identity with a military hierarchy set on foreign waters (analogous to space travel), tight relationship between senior officers, a genuine sense of adventure and scientific exploration (the Galapagos island scene is as good as any away mission) and gritty political intrigue that casts world-powers as close competitors in the Alpha-Quadrant, er uh Pacific ocean.

I believe a kind of Star Trek movie marathon would start well with this flick! Call me crazy!
William B - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 8:45pm (USA Central)
Re: Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan

Without having rewatched,

II
VIII
IV
I
VI
III
VII
XI
IX
V
X

(not listed: XII (not seen yet))
Dave in NC - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 8:29pm (USA Central)
Re: TNG S2: Peak Performance

I, for one, appreciate the chess refresher.

Queen to Rook 4.
Dave in NC - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 8:11pm (USA Central)
Re: Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan

I just wanted to say that I love that you all used Roman numerals.
William B - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 7:00pm (USA Central)
Re: TOS S3: And the Children Shall Lead

Very little to add. The one thing that I will say *sort of* in the episode's defense, in contrast to some of the earlier comments, is that Gorgon's powers are so ill-defined that some of the "plot" problems can be attributed to those wacky powers. Like, yes, obviously Uhura and Sulu being stunned into complete inaction by fear of looking ugly and fear that the ship will be stabbed by giant swords is many kinds of ridiculous, but I don't quite think even this episode is arguing that they are *just* reacting to the images, as if ugly/old-Uhura and swords projected onto panels and viewscreens would be enough to deter them from action. Their fears drive them insane and distort their reality in the same manner and to a similar degree to the way the adults on the planet went insane.

The other edge of that double-edged floating space sword or dagger is that Gorgon's/the kids' powers/motivations are so poorly defined that it's basically nearly impossible to discern what is going on throughout the show -- how much did the kids actually kill their parents, and how much were they purely mind-controlled? Were they mind-controlled at all, or just talked into it by a "charismatic" leader with no powers of his own? But then they got powers from him, so.... Evaluating what this episode is *trying* to say about kids and parents is pointless, because it's unclear whether we're to expect there was some kind of full-scale childhood rebellion or simply a massive case of brainwashing.

1/2 star is probably fair; I don't think it quite reaches zero-star levels. Makes the way the similarly-themed "Miri" or "Imaginary Friend" deals with children seem like they're Mark Twain.
Mike - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 6:17pm (USA Central)
Re: VOY S6: Spirit Folk

At least now we "know" holodec energy consumption: 300 deciwatts (30 W) for sentient photons and force fields. i could run one at home
Elliott - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 5:54pm (USA Central)
Re: TNG S2: Peak Performance

@Andy's Friend :

I think you meant to end with "And you, sir, can suck on that."
Elliott - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 5:52pm (USA Central)
Re: Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan

Note to commenters: check your work on uneditable sites ...

I
II
VIII
VI
IV
III
IX
VII
V
X
XI
XII
Elliott - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 5:51pm (USA Central)
Re: Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan

Dammit, missed Nemesis:

I
II
VIII
VI
IV
III
IX
VIII
V
X
XI
XII
Elliott - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 5:49pm (USA Central)
Re: Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan

@Robert :"TMP.... best ST film?!!"

Hell, yes! Without reservation, it's my favourite film.

I'd rank them, at least right now like this :

I
II
VIII
VI
IV
III
IX
VII
V
XI
XII
Andy's Friend - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 4:56pm (USA Central)
Re: TNG S2: Peak Performance

@Andrew: you are utterly wrong, yet presume to lecture others. Allow me, just that you may appreciate the irony of your mistake, to quote in extenso your comment of 11 September 2014, ‏‎23:43:05:

“There's no such thing as "ending on it's own" in this scenario, that's why a stalemate is called. When a game reaches the point where neither play can defeat the other, it is considered a stalemate and the game is over (and a draw, again see definition of stalemate: neither side wins). In such scenarios, stalemate does not preclude being able to move additional pieces, rather it is precisely because you could ENDLESSLY move pieces with no resolution. This is the exact scenario in Peak Performance.

But even if you don't how understand HOW a stalemate is reached, simply understanding the meaning of stalemate and the fact that the characters acknowledge the game ended in stalemate is sufficient (and by Data, not a win "No sir," he says") to see that the game ended in a draw and not a win by Data.

Please beef up your vocabulary.”

Well, why don’t we beef up our vocabulary, then, and find out what a stalemate actually is?

“STALEMATE is a situation in the game of chess where the player whose turn it is to move is not in check but has no legal move. The rules of chess provide that when stalemate occurs, the game ends as a DRAW.“

And what exactly is a draw then in chess?

“In chess, a DRAW is the result of a game ending in a TIE. Usually, in tournaments a draw is worth a half point to each player, while a win is worth one point to the victor and none to the loser.
For the most part, a draw occurs when it appears that neither side will win. Draws are codified by various rules of chess including STALEMATE (when the player to move has no legal move and is not in check), THREEFOLD REPETITION (when the same position occurs three times with the same player to move), and the FIFTY-MOVE rule (when the last fifty successive moves made by both players contain no capture or pawn move). A draw also occurs when neither player has sufficient material to checkmate the opponent or when no sequence of legal moves can lead to checkmate.”

What was it again you wrote, Andrew?

”[...] stalemate does not preclude being able to move additional pieces, rather it is precisely because you could ENDLESSLY move pieces with no resolution. This is the exact scenario in Peak Performance.”

Yes, this is the exact scenario in Peak Performance: they could endlessly move pieces with no resolution.

And no, as we have just seen, that is NOT a stalemate by any chess definition. In a stalemate, one of the sides has no legal move. Robert was thus right about Data's use of the word "stalemate", and you, Andrew, were wrong.

So to quote you again, "But even if you don't how understand HOW a stalemate is reached, simply understanding the meaning of stalemate" should now have settled the matter.

Need I remind you of your last sentence in the comment I quoted?
bhbor - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 3:55pm (USA Central)
Re: Frequently Asked Questions

*cough* Star Trek: Continues *cough*
bhbor - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 2:57pm (USA Central)
Re: ENT S3: Similitude

I agree that the writers definitely let Archer off the hook when Trip willingly agrees to the procedure. But the confrontation in Trip's quarters followed up by the resolution in the shuttle bay rings true for Trip as a character that would give his life to save his friends. Further, I really enjoyed seeing Archer unshaven, dead eyed - burned out. This is clearly a man with the weight of the world on his shoulders and his depiction is very reminiscent of Captain Picard in "Yesterday's Enterprise" or the borg-war crazy Alterna-Riker in "Parallels".

Archer is tired of making the big decisions and tired of being trapped in hopeless situations. It seems like the Enterprise is running out of luck and the Captain needs a break. I don't think its lost on him that saving humanity might mean killing his friend and it feels right that Sim, in an act of friendship, wants to make this one awful decision a little easier for Archer.

Pretty good episode!
colincostello - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 2:20pm (USA Central)
Re: VOY S6: Life Line

I reaaly enjoyed this episode, It confirms my opinion the Robert Picardo is by far the besr actor ever to wear a Star Fleet uniform. If only the rest of the cast could match this high standard of acting. The only one who can even come close to his level is 7 and their scenes are dekightful to watch.
Colin
Shaen - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 2:12pm (USA Central)
Re: VOY S6: The Haunting of Deck Twelve

This episode really drives home the fact that nearly every Star Trek writer had no idea what nebulas actually are.
Edington - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 12:36pm (USA Central)
Re: DS9 S3: Family Business

I generally hate the Ferengi stories, this one included, even though i am a capitalist. However you can usually find very impressive or humorous moments, often understated, such as the preces and ritual welcoming of Brunt into Quarks home, performed with the perfect amount of rote lackluster you'd expect from two people who don't like each other yet begrudgingly respect their shared traditions:

Quark (handing Brunt a towell to dry his head, and giving the Ferengi gesture of piety): "Remember, my house is my house"

Brunt (in response, returning the gesture): "As are its contents."

A very well done moment, and hilarious to anyone who ever performs routine social or pious rituals.
Dave in NC - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 12:22pm (USA Central)
Re: Frequently Asked Questions

@ Jammer

I'd rethink the whole not-reviewing GoT thing, because you do have some insightful opinions about television. I like reading what you have to say.

Surely you have room for one review a week! :)
$G - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 9:14am (USA Central)
Re: DS9 S5: A Simple Investigation

I've enjoyed the episodes in Odo's breaking-out-of-his-shell arc. "Heart of Stone" was good, "Crossfire" was very good, and "The Begotten" was solid (for Odo, not its middling B-story). "A Simple Investigation" works, though not nearly as well as it should.

The problem is that far too much time is spent on the criminal plot. It's clumsy, and, as I've said before, the more an episode hinges on guest characters the more ways it can go wrong or feel rote. Because we don't have an iota of investment in, say, the assassins everything they say or do has to be perfunctory (down to the painfully obvious "look what you did to the carpet!" after they murder another guest character). Odo will pick up on this clue and yada yada yada.

"Crossfire" was awesome because Odo's investigations were secondary to the real story. We didn't have to watch guest characters fumble through the crime - only how Odo reacted to events alongside pining for Kira. The assassination plot was never shown, simmering beneath and eventually demonstrating Odo's inability to focus on his job. "ASI" shouldn't have copied that treatment for its own story, but it could really have used something to distance the generic moments from what's really important (Odo's relationship with Arissa). As it is, it all feels like fifth season Odo starring in a first season episode. The necessary characterization needed this long to develop but the plot isn't confident enough in it being the selling point - not entirely unlike a shakedown episode that has to show off everything about Odo at once so that we'll be on the same page moving forward.

I usually give 2 and a half stars to otherwise good episodes that end up with a noticeable flaw (poor ending, bad B-plot, etc.) or ones that are acceptable but not particularly outstanding. "ASI" is the latter. It's got moments that a viewer will no doubt recall when putting together a definition of Odo as a character, but as its own 40-minute slice of entertainment it's mostly forgettable.
Jammer - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 8:57am (USA Central)
Re: Frequently Asked Questions

I do watch "Game of Thrones" and enjoy it a lot. I doubt I will write anything about it given the current state of my overall writing hiatus, but there are plenty of other reviews out there who have it covered.
Trent - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 7:12am (USA Central)
Re: VOY S7: The Void

Awww, what a great little episode. Federation values save the day! It's a shame we couldn't stay in the void longer.
TS - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 4:56am (USA Central)
Re: Frequently Asked Questions

Jammer,

Do you watch Game of Thrones? If you do, what are your thoughts on it and do you plan on writing anything about it whenever you get the chance? Thanks!

(I think it's a mostly fantastic show btw, really hits on a lot of the elements I loved from character rich shows like DS9 and BSG.)
V_Is_For_Voyager - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 2:40am (USA Central)
Re: VOY S3: Coda

This episode is actually one of my favorites and I disagree with almost everyone here on at least one point: I think the less interesting part of the story was the repeating death scenes, and the show became most interesting when the "father figure" showed up. Len Cariou's acting was wonderful, especially the way he turned from genuinely warm and sympathetic to utterly evil, one of the best villains of the series. Also I want to point out that the music in the final confrontation scene was brilliantly subtle and effective, straight out of a horror movie. It starts out very faint and then gradually builds as the realization comes to Janeway about what is happening - it expresses all the creepiness of what the "father" character was trying to do, then it develops a deep - strong quality as Janeway begins to overcome him. I didn't think that scene was overstated or overacted, in fact, I thought it was one of Janeway's best and most satisfying confrontations of the series, because she is truly alone and has been through an unimaginably nightmarish ordeal, is feeling shattered and vulnerable, and yet must summon up all her redoubtable willpower and command power to resist.

Reading some of these reviews and the criticisms of them I'm beginning to understand why I enjoyed many of these Voyager episodes more than some people. In the first place, I saw this series before I saw TNG, so I was not constantly comparing these episodes to old episodes of the previous series (also, I think the production values and acting were of generally higher quality and the writing frequently tighter on Voyager, so while TNG may get the prize for originality, VOY beats it in terms of execution). In the second place, I don't overthink the internal logic of these plots, and I willingly suspend disbelief for the sake of enjoyment of the drama. Yes, it doesn't make sense that the Captain and First Officer would be on an away mission together - but rather than let that spoil the episode for me, I'd rather enjoy the fact that we get a glimpse in the crash scene of how fanatically devoted (and possibly romantically attached) the otherwise taciturn and reserved Chakotay is towards Janeway at this early point in the series, which is both moving and revealing in terms of what has been going on inside his character. I'd much rather have such a meaty slice of character insight and drama at the expense of perfectly consistent plot points. You might as well nitpick the fact that there aren't enough non-humanoid alien lifeforms on the show, or that 24th-century English would sound a lot different from English as we spoke it in the late 1980s and early 90s. There are endless little "unrealistic" points and elements which, if you want to nitpick, can easily reduce all of Star Trek to an absurdity. Suspension of disbelief involves, for instance, assuming there was some good reason why the Captain and First Officer were on that shuttle together - maybe because Janeway and Chakotay were feeling some chemistry at this point and she used the away mission as a chance for them to bend the rules and get some alone time together? It's just as easy to find reasons to explain these little inconsistencies instead of picking them full of holes, and for myself, I'd rather appreciate a piece of drama for the emotional payoff of the performance rather than for the intellectual satisfaction of picking it full of holes.

Anyway, good episode, great final scene, great guest performance, great music. Also, as Jammer pointed out, great acting by the rest of the cast.
Dave in NC - Sun, Sep 14, 2014, 1:02am (USA Central)
Re: TNG S1: Justice

I actually like this episode: yes, it is cheesy hokum. t does have it's positives: the planet is believably "alien", we hear some pretty frank talk about sexuality, and this may be the first TNG that really made the Prime Directive a center to the plot.

Also, I loved when the Edo responded to Picard's moralizing with thinly veiled sarcasm. This isn't an episode that's designed to be nitpicked, but still, why exactly didn't they just take Wesley and leave when brought up the idea?

Conclusion:yes, there are plot issues, however I found it to be a kitschy, fun romp with some interesting commentary on the Prime Directive.

** ½ stars

@ David M Are we to the point now where any man without a shirt has to look like an Adonis? I cannot believe people are so shallow. Besides, how do you know the Edo don't have a different male physiology than us?

@ Elliot & Paul M.

Absolutely agree on the music for this episode! The music does SO much to advance the plot and generate atmosphere. Really astounding work, especially when you consider the composer only had three weeks to write the score.

I'm so glad to see I'm not the only one who notices it!

Next »Page 1 of 861
Copyright © 1994-2014, Jamahl Epsicokhan. All rights reserved. Unauthorized reproduction or distribution of any review or article on this site is prohibited. Star Trek (in all its myriad forms), Battlestar Galactica, and Gene Roddenberry's Andromeda are trademarks of CBS Studios Inc., NBC Universal, and Tribune Entertainment, respectively. This site is in no way affiliated with or authorized by any of those companies. | Copyright & Disclaimer